Special Issue "Nanoparticle-Based Biosensors for Food and Health Monitoring"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Rona Chandrawati
Website
Guest Editor
School of Chemical Engineering, University of New South Wales (UNSW Sydney), Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
Interests: nanoparticle sensors; biosensors; optical sensors; early disease diagnosis; food safety
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sensors (analytical devices) that enable fast, specific, and sensitive detection of chemical and biological compounds continue to be developed with important applications in health, food, and environmental monitoring. Biosensors could facilitate the rapid diagnosis of diseases in their early stages, which is critical for effective disease management. In the area of food safety and quality, sensors could provide food-processing operators, consumers, and food safety authorities with the ability to rapidly detect potential contaminants. This Special Issue of Biosensors will highlight recent developments and contributions of nanomaterials for improving the performance of biosensors in detecting disease biomarkers or food contaminants. It will include studies on colloidal sensors or paper-based devices for the detection of proteins, nucleic acids, toxins, bacteria, cells, volatile organic compounds, drugs, etc. in biological or food samples. Both original contributions and reviews are welcome to provide an overview of the state of the art in nanoparticle-based sensors.

Dr. Rona Chandrawati
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biosensors
  • Nanoparticle sensors
  • Point of care
  • Diagnosis
  • Disease biomarkers
  • Food safety
  • Food contaminants

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Influence of the Parameters of a Gold Nanoparticle Deposition Method on Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes, Their Electrochemical Response, and Protein Adsorption
Biosensors 2019, 9(4), 138; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9040138 - 20 Nov 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
The goal of this research was to find the best conditions to prepare titanium dioxide nanotubes (TNTs) modified with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). This paper, for the first time, reports on the influence of the parameters of cyclic voltammetry process (CV) -based AuNP deposition, [...] Read more.
The goal of this research was to find the best conditions to prepare titanium dioxide nanotubes (TNTs) modified with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). This paper, for the first time, reports on the influence of the parameters of cyclic voltammetry process (CV) -based AuNP deposition, i.e., the number of cycles and the concentration of gold salt solution, on corrosion resistance and the capacitance of TNTs. Another innovation was to fabricate AuNPs with well-formed spherical geometry and uniform distribution on TNTs. The AuNPs/TNTs were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and open-circuit potential measurement. From the obtained results, the correlation between the deposition process parameters, the AuNP diameters, and the electrical conductivity of the TNTs was found in a range from 14.3 ± 1.8 to 182.3 ± 51.7 nm. The size and amount of the AuNPs could be controlled by the number of deposition cycles and the concentration of the gold salt solution. The modification of TNTs using AuNPs facilitated electron transfer, increased the corrosion resistance, and caused better adsorption properties for bovine serum albumin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticle-Based Biosensors for Food and Health Monitoring)
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Open AccessArticle
Casein-Conjugated Gold Nanoparticles for Amperometric Detection of Leishmania infantum
Biosensors 2019, 9(2), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9020068 - 27 May 2019
Abstract
Sensitive and reliable approaches targeting the detection of Leishmania are critical for effective early diagnosis and treatment of leishmaniasis. In this frame, this paper describes a rapid quantification assay to detect Leishmania parasites based on the combination of the electrocatalytic ability of gold [...] Read more.
Sensitive and reliable approaches targeting the detection of Leishmania are critical for effective early diagnosis and treatment of leishmaniasis. In this frame, this paper describes a rapid quantification assay to detect Leishmania parasites based on the combination of the electrocatalytic ability of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to act as a catalyst for the hydrogen formation reaction along with the specificity of the interaction between casein and the major surface protease of the Leishmania parasite, GP63. First, pure and casein-modified AuNPs were prepared and characterized by scanning electron microscopy and ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy. Then, casein-conjugated AuNPs were incubated with Leishsmania parasites in solution; the formed complex was collected by centrifugation, treated by acidic solution, and the pelleted AuNPs were placed on screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs) and chronoamperometric measurements were carried out. Our results suggest that it is possible to detect Leishmania parasites, with a limit less than 1 parasite/mL. A linear response over a wide concentration interval, ranging from 2 × 10−2 to 2 × 105 parasites/mL, was achieved. Additionally, a pretreatment of Leishmania parasites with Amphotericin B, diminished their interaction with casein. This findings and methodology are very useful for drug efficacy assessment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticle-Based Biosensors for Food and Health Monitoring)
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