Special Issue "Graphene and Carbon Nanotube Based Biosensors"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2016).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Prabir Patra
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Bridgeport, Bridgeport, USA
Interests: biomaterials; biosensors; nanofabrication; graphene and carbon nanotubes based architectures; nanocomposites; polymers; hydrogels, inkjet printing, tissue engineering; drug delivery; computational biology and bioinformatics
Dr. Ashish Aphale

Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Adjunct Faculty, School of Engineering, University of Bridgeport, Bridgeport, USA
Interests: biosensors; graphene, carbon nanotubes; nanocomposite thin films; electrochemical impedance; cyclic voltammetry; energy storage; supercapacitors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is an unmet need to explore the fundamentals and develop ultra-sensitive, easy-to-use, and rapid diagnostic devices in multiple disciplines, such as clinical medicine, food safety, and immunoassays. Detection of biomarkers is a standard method for disease diagnosis and can be employed for successful detection of various diseases. Discovery of new biomarkers, advancement of surface chemistry and its control and various detection techniques has enabled the development of ultra-sensitive devices capable of detecting multiple targets at once. Furthermore, owing to extremely unique properties, such as superior conductivity and extremely large specific surface area, materials like graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNT) have shown potential applicability in the field of biosensing.

This Special Issue invites contributions in the field of biosensors using innovative development techniques, especially focusing on graphitic carbon. Examples of application area include, but not limited to, cancer makers detection, general health monitoring, clinical analysis and diagnosis of disease, industrial monitoring and processing, and environmental pollution monitoring.

Dr. Prabir Patra
Dr. Ashish Aphale
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biomarkers,
  • graphene,
  • carbon nanotubes,
  • electroanalysis,
  • biosurface engineering

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Single Molecule Bioelectronics and Their Application to Amplification-Free Measurement of DNA Lengths
Biosensors 2016, 6(3), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios6030029 - 24 Jun 2016
Cited by 3
Abstract
As biosensing devices shrink smaller and smaller, they approach a scale in which single molecule electronic sensing becomes possible. Here, we review the operation of single-enzyme transistors made using single-walled carbon nanotubes. These novel hybrid devices transduce the motions and catalytic activity of [...] Read more.
As biosensing devices shrink smaller and smaller, they approach a scale in which single molecule electronic sensing becomes possible. Here, we review the operation of single-enzyme transistors made using single-walled carbon nanotubes. These novel hybrid devices transduce the motions and catalytic activity of a single protein into an electronic signal for real-time monitoring of the protein’s activity. Analysis of these electronic signals reveals new insights into enzyme function and proves the electronic technique to be complementary to other single-molecule methods based on fluorescence. As one example of the nanocircuit technique, we have studied the Klenow Fragment (KF) of DNA polymerase I as it catalytically processes single-stranded DNA templates. The fidelity of DNA polymerases makes them a key component in many DNA sequencing techniques, and here we demonstrate that KF nanocircuits readily resolve DNA polymerization with single-base sensitivity. Consequently, template lengths can be directly counted from electronic recordings of KF’s base-by-base activity. After measuring as few as 20 copies, the template length can be determined with <1 base pair resolution, and different template lengths can be identified and enumerated in solutions containing template mixtures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Graphene and Carbon Nanotube Based Biosensors)
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Open AccessReview
Recent Advances in Electrochemical Biosensors Based on Fullerene-C60 Nano-Structured Platforms
Biosensors 2015, 5(4), 712-735; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios5040712 - 23 Nov 2015
Cited by 44
Abstract
Nanotechnology is becoming increasingly important in the field of (bio)sensors. The performance and sensitivity of biosensors is greatly improved with the integration of nanomaterials into their construction. Since its first discovery, fullerene-C60 has been the object of extensive research. Its unique and [...] Read more.
Nanotechnology is becoming increasingly important in the field of (bio)sensors. The performance and sensitivity of biosensors is greatly improved with the integration of nanomaterials into their construction. Since its first discovery, fullerene-C60 has been the object of extensive research. Its unique and favorable characteristics of easy chemical modification, conductivity, and electrochemical properties has led to its tremendous use in (bio)sensor applications. This paper provides a concise review of advances in fullerene-C60 research and its use as a nanomaterial for the development of biosensors. We examine the research work reported in the literature on the synthesis, functionalization, approaches to nanostructuring electrodes with fullerene, and outline some of the exciting applications in the field of (bio)sensing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Graphene and Carbon Nanotube Based Biosensors)
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