Special Issue "Electrochemical (Bio)sensors for Environmental and Food Analyses II"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Kevin C. Honeychurch
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Guest Editor
Senior Lecturer in Forensic Chemistry, Centre for Research in Biosciences, Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK
Interests: screen-printed electrodes, electrochemical sensors, biosensors, biomedicine, forensic science, environmental analysis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Martina Piano
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Bio-Sensing Technology (IBST), University of the West of England, Bristol, UK
Interests: biosensors; environmental analysis; microfluidics; antibodies; magnetic beads; enzyme stabilisation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The complexity of the environment offers a number of analytical challenges; challenges that need to be met if we are to be able to provide clean drinking water and food, as well as to safeguard environmental quality for ourselves and future generations. Presently, many monitoring regimes are focused on the collection of samples and their subsequent analyses at a centralised laboratory; systems, which, by their nature, have an inherent lag-time, utilise expensive instrumentation, and require highly-trained staff for their implementation. The application of electrochemical sensors and biosensors has shown the possibility of economic, rapid, and decentralised testing of complex samples, carried out by relatively untrained individuals at the point-of-need. Analyses of food and the environment offer large potential markets and opportunities for these devices; however, there are a number of both technical and commercial issues that need to be addressed before these devices can have a significant role.

The aim of this Special Issue of Biosensors, “Electrochemical (Bio)sensors for Environmental and Food Analyses II” is to report recent developments and advances in sensors and biosensors to meet the demands of environmental and food analysis. Its objective is to collect a series of articles which show the developments and applications of both electrochemical sensors and biosensors in this area. It is envisaged that this will cover a wide range of areas; including electrochemical sensors employing both classical and advanced electrochemical techniques, electrochemical biosensors based on enzymes, antibodies, DNA, aptamers, molecularly imprinted polymers and the application of nanotechnology in the forms of reviews, communications, and academic articles.

Dr. Kevin C. Honeychurch
Dr. Martina Piano
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Disturbing-Free Determination of Yeast Concentration in DI Water and in Glucose Using Impedance Biochips
Biosensors 2020, 10(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios10010007 - 19 Jan 2020
Abstract
Deionized water and glucose without yeast and with yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) of optical density OD600 that ranges from 4 to 16 has been put in the ring electrode region of six different types of impedance biochips and impedance has been [...] Read more.
Deionized water and glucose without yeast and with yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) of optical density OD600 that ranges from 4 to 16 has been put in the ring electrode region of six different types of impedance biochips and impedance has been measured in dependence on the added volume (20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 µL). The measured impedance of two out of the six types of biochips is strongly sensitive to the addition of both liquid without yeast and liquid with yeast and modelled impedance reveals a linear relationship between the impedance model parameters and yeast concentration. The presented biochips allow for continuous impedance measurements without interrupting the cultivation of the yeast. A multiparameter fit of the impedance model parameters allows for determining the concentration of yeast (cy) in the range from cy = 3.3 × 107 to cy = 17 × 107 cells/mL. This work shows that independent on the liquid, i.e., DI water or glucose, the impedance model parameters of the two most sensitive types of biochips with liquid without yeast and with liquid with yeast are clearly distinguishable for the two most sensitive types of biochips. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrochemical (Bio)sensors for Environmental and Food Analyses II)
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Open AccessReview
Integrated Electrochemical Biosensors for Detection of Waterborne Pathogens in Low-Resource Settings
Biosensors 2020, 10(4), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios10040036 - 13 Apr 2020
Abstract
More than 783 million people worldwide are currently without access to clean and safe water. Approximately 1 in 5 cases of mortality due to waterborne diseases involve children, and over 1.5 million cases of waterborne disease occur every year. In the developing world, [...] Read more.
More than 783 million people worldwide are currently without access to clean and safe water. Approximately 1 in 5 cases of mortality due to waterborne diseases involve children, and over 1.5 million cases of waterborne disease occur every year. In the developing world, this makes waterborne diseases the second highest cause of mortality. Such cases of waterborne disease are thought to be caused by poor sanitation, water infrastructure, public knowledge, and lack of suitable water monitoring systems. Conventional laboratory-based techniques are inadequate for effective on-site water quality monitoring purposes. This is due to their need for excessive equipment, operational complexity, lack of affordability, and long sample collection to data analysis times. In this review, we discuss the conventional techniques used in modern-day water quality testing. We discuss the future challenges of water quality testing in the developing world and how conventional techniques fall short of these challenges. Finally, we discuss the development of electrochemical biosensors and current research on the integration of these devices with microfluidic components to develop truly integrated, portable, simple to use and cost-effective devices for use by local environmental agencies, NGOs, and local communities in low-resource settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrochemical (Bio)sensors for Environmental and Food Analyses II)
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