Nano and Micro DNA/RNA Biosensors

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Nano- and Micro-Technologies in Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2024 | Viewed by 2104

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, University of Patras, Rio, 26504 Patras, Greece
Interests: biosensors; lateral flow assays; nanotechnology in biosensing; analytical methods; diagnostics; genomics; liquid biopsy; food authentication
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nano and Micro Biosensors are state-of-the-art analytical tools with many applications. They have gained the interest of scientists due to the unique characteristics of the micro-, and especially, nanomaterials used, providing signal enhancements and high sensitivity/detectability along with a rapid analysis time, cost effectiveness, simplicity in fabrication and use, portability and increased multiplexity. On the other hand, nucleic acids, DNA and RNA, are usually the preferred analytes due to their stability in diverse environmental conditions or during extensive processing. Thus, Nano and Micro DNA/RNA Biosensors are a valuable alternative to convention methods of nucleic acid analysis. Moreover, the use of micro- and nanomaterials enable the easy immobilization of various recognition biomolecules on the surface of biosensors for target analyses and interdisciplinary applications.

Both original research and review articles on novel systems or approaches to electrochemical DNA/RNA biosensors are welcome.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Innovative concepts in sensitive DNA/RNA detection;
  • New materials and nanomaterials used in DNA/RNA Biosensor devices, e.g., Carbon nanotubes, graphene, nanoparticles, and other organic-based semiconductors;
  • Devices and microfluidic systems, including electrochemical DNA/RNA biosensors;
  • Electrochemical DNA/RNA detection analysis in situ and in vivo.

Dr. Despina P. Kalogianni
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biosensors
  • DNA, RNA, nucleic acids
  • nanotechnology
  • nanomaterials
  • nanoparticles
  • microtechnology
  • microparticles
  • nanofabrication
  • microfabrication

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 3392 KiB  
Article
Molecular Rapid Test for Identification of Tuna Species
by Isidora P. Gkini, Panagiotis Christopoulos, Alexis Conides, Despina P. Kalogianni and Theodore K. Christopoulos
Biosensors 2024, 14(2), 82; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios14020082 - 2 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1860
Abstract
Tuna is an excellent food product, relatively low in calories, that is recommended for a balanced diet. The continuously increasing demand, especially for bluefin-tuna-based food preparations, and its relatively high market price make adulteration by intentionally mixing with other lower-priced tunas more prospective. [...] Read more.
Tuna is an excellent food product, relatively low in calories, that is recommended for a balanced diet. The continuously increasing demand, especially for bluefin-tuna-based food preparations, and its relatively high market price make adulteration by intentionally mixing with other lower-priced tunas more prospective. The development of rapid methods to detect tuna adulteration is a great challenge in food analytical science. We have thus developed a simple, fast, and low-cost molecular rapid test for the visual detection of tuna adulteration. It is the first sensor developed for tuna authenticity testing. The three species studied were Thunnus thynnus (BFT), Thunnus albacares, and Katsuwonus pelamis. DNA was isolated from fresh and heat-treated cooked fish samples followed by PCR. The PCR products were hybridized (10 min) to specific probes and applied to the rapid sensing device. The signal was observed visually in 10–15 min using gold nanoparticle reporters. The method was evaluated employing binary mixtures of PCR products from fresh tissues and mixtures of DNA isolates from heat-treated tissues (canned products) at adulteration percentages of 1–100%. The results showed that the method was reproducible and specific for each tuna species. As low as 1% of tuna adulteration was detected with the naked eye. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nano and Micro DNA/RNA Biosensors)
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