Advances in Fluorescent Probe Biosensing

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Optical and Photonic Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2023) | Viewed by 15540

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Resource Utilization, Key Laboratory of Forest Plant Ecology, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040, China
Interests: fluorescent probes; bioimaging; nanozyme catalysis

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Key Laboratory of Pulp & Paper Science and Technology of Shandong Province/Ministry of Education, State Key Laboratory of Biobased Material and Green Papermaking, Qilu University of Technology (Shandong Academy of Sciences), Jinan 250353, China
Interests: fluorescent probes; fluorescence imaging; novel fluorescent dyes
College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Resource Utilization, Key Laboratory of Forest Plant Ecology, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040, China
Interests: fluorescent probes; bioimaging; nanozyme catalysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The main task of biosensing is to achieve fast and sensitive biological analysis and to visualize biological activities based on the characteristics of the analyzed signals. The fluorescence method based on high-performance fluorescent probes is one of the most informative and sensitive analytical techniques for bioanalysis. Designing fluorescent molecules with structural diversity for different biosensing needs is known as the most creative activity in the field of fluorescent probes. The interaction between the fluorescent probes and analytes is studied by computer simulation and other techniques, so as to clarify the fluorescence sensing mechanism. Therefore, this special issue "Progress in Fluorescent Probe Biosensing" focuses on the research progress of fluorescent materials with suitable temperature, good stability, high optical efficiency and good biocompatibility. Based on this, advanced ideas for bioanalysis, such as sensor arrays, visualization devices, etc., will be explored, and real-time noninvasive bioimaging strategies will be developed. We invite submissions of research that will help advance the field of advanced fluorescent probes design technologies and their application in biosensing.

Prof. Dr. Ligang Chen
Dr. Mingguang Ren
Dr. Na Niu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • fluorescent probes
  • bioanalysis
  • bioimaging
  • sensing mechanism
  • sensor arrays
  • visual inspection

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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17 pages, 3752 KiB  
Article
Biocompatible Phosphorescent O2 Sensors Based on Ir(III) Complexes for In Vivo Hypoxia Imaging
by Mozhgan Samandarsangari, Daria O. Kozina, Victor V. Sokolov, Anastasia D. Komarova, Marina V. Shirmanova, Ilya S. Kritchenkov and Sergey P. Tunik
Biosensors 2023, 13(7), 680; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios13070680 - 26 Jun 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1335
Abstract
In this work, we obtained three new phosphorescent iridium complexes (Ir1Ir3) of general stoichiometry [Ir(N^C)2(N^N)]Cl decorated with oligo(ethylene glycol) fragments to make them water-soluble and biocompatible, as well as to protect them from aggregation with biomolecules such [...] Read more.
In this work, we obtained three new phosphorescent iridium complexes (Ir1Ir3) of general stoichiometry [Ir(N^C)2(N^N)]Cl decorated with oligo(ethylene glycol) fragments to make them water-soluble and biocompatible, as well as to protect them from aggregation with biomolecules such as albumin. The major photophysical characteristics of these phosphorescent complexes are determined by the nature of two cyclometallating ligands (N^C) based on 2-pyridine-benzothiophene, since quantum chemical calculations revealed that the electronic transitions responsible for the excitation and emission are localized mainly at these fragments. However, the use of various diimine ligands (N^N) proved to affect the quantum yield of phosphorescence and allowed for changing the complexes’ sensitivity to oxygen, due to the variations in the steric accessibility of the chromophore center for O2 molecules. It was also found that the N^N ligands made it possible to tune the biocompatibility of the resulting compounds. The wavelengths of the Ir1Ir3 emission maxima fell in the range of 630–650 nm, the quantum yields reached 17% (Ir1) in a deaerated solution, and sensitivity to molecular oxygen, estimated as the ratio of emission lifetime in deaerated and aerated water solutions, displayed the highest value, 8.2, for Ir1. The obtained complexes featured low toxicity, good water solubility and the absence of a significant effect of biological environment components on the parameters of their emission. Of the studied compounds, Ir1 and Ir2 were chosen for in vitro and in vivo biological experiments to estimate oxygen concentration in cell lines and tumors. These sensors have demonstrated their effectiveness for mapping the distribution of oxygen and for monitoring hypoxia in the biological objects studied. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Fluorescent Probe Biosensing)
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14 pages, 9048 KiB  
Article
Simultaneous Measurement of Changes in Mitochondrial and Endoplasmic Reticulum Free Calcium in Pancreatic Beta Cells
by Sivakumar Jeyarajan, Irina X Zhang, Peter Arvan, Stephen I. Lentz and Leslie S. Satin
Biosensors 2023, 13(3), 382; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios13030382 - 14 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2479
Abstract
The free calcium (Ca2+) levels in pancreatic beta cell organelles have been the subject of many recent investigations. Under pathophysiological conditions, disturbances in these pools have been linked to altered intracellular communication and cellular dysfunction. To facilitate studies of subcellular Ca [...] Read more.
The free calcium (Ca2+) levels in pancreatic beta cell organelles have been the subject of many recent investigations. Under pathophysiological conditions, disturbances in these pools have been linked to altered intracellular communication and cellular dysfunction. To facilitate studies of subcellular Ca2+ signaling in beta cells and, particularly, signaling between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, we designed a novel dual Ca2+ sensor which we termed DS-1. DS-1 encodes two stoichiometrically fluorescent proteins within a single plasmid, G-CEPIA-er, targeted to the ER and R-CEPIA3-mt, targeted to mitochondria. Our goal was to simultaneously measure the ER and mitochondrial Ca2+ in cells in real time. The Kds of G-CEPIA-er and R-CEPIA3-mt for Ca2+ are 672 and 3.7 μM, respectively. Confocal imaging of insulin-secreting INS-1 832/13 expressing DS-1 confirmed that the green and red fluorophores correctly colocalized with organelle-specific fluorescent markers as predicted. Further, we tested whether DS-1 exhibited the functional properties expected by challenging an INS-1 cell to glucose concentrations or drugs having well-documented effects on the ER and mitochondrial Ca2+ handling. The data obtained were consistent with those seen using other single organelle targeted probes. These results taken together suggest that DS-1 is a promising new approach for investigating Ca2+ signaling within multiple organelles of the cell. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Fluorescent Probe Biosensing)
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10 pages, 2091 KiB  
Communication
AIEgens-Doped Photonic Crystals for High Sensitivity Fluorescence Detection of Tumor Markers
by Zhijun Liao, Qian Zhou and Bingbing Gao
Biosensors 2023, 13(2), 276; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios13020276 - 15 Feb 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1805
Abstract
Detection of tumor markers is of great significance to preliminarily judge whether patients have malignant tumors. Fluorescence detection (FD) is an effective means to achieve sensitive detection of tumor markers. Currently, the increased sensitivity of FD has attracted research interest worldwide. Here, we [...] Read more.
Detection of tumor markers is of great significance to preliminarily judge whether patients have malignant tumors. Fluorescence detection (FD) is an effective means to achieve sensitive detection of tumor markers. Currently, the increased sensitivity of FD has attracted research interest worldwide. Here, we have proposed a method of doping luminogens with aggregation-induced emission (AIEgens) into photonic crystals (PCs), which can significantly enhance the fluorescence intensity to achieve high sensitivity in the detection of tumor markers. PCs are made by scraping and self-assembling, which has the special effect of fluorescence enhancement. The combination of AIEgens and PCs can enhance the fluorescence intensity 4–7 times. These characteristics make it extremely sensitive. The limit of detection (LOD) for the detection of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in the AIE10 (Tetraphenyl ethylene-Br) doped PCs with a reflection peak of 520 nm is 0.0377 ng/mL. LOD for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in the AIE25 (Tetraphenyl ethylene-NH2) doped PCs with a reflection peak of 590 nm is 0.0337 ng/mL. Our concept offers a good solution for highly sensitive detection of tumor markers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Fluorescent Probe Biosensing)
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Review

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29 pages, 6041 KiB  
Review
Luminescent Guests Encapsulated in Metal–Organic Frameworks for Portable Fluorescence Sensor and Visual Detection Applications: A Review
by Xu Xu, Muyao Ma, Tongxin Sun, Xin Zhao and Lei Zhang
Biosensors 2023, 13(4), 435; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios13040435 - 29 Mar 2023
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3227
Abstract
Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) have excellent applicability in several fields and have significant structural advantages, due to their open pore structure, high porosity, large specific surface area, and easily modifiable and functionalized porous surface. In addition, a variety of luminescent guest (LG) species can [...] Read more.
Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) have excellent applicability in several fields and have significant structural advantages, due to their open pore structure, high porosity, large specific surface area, and easily modifiable and functionalized porous surface. In addition, a variety of luminescent guest (LG) species can be encapsulated in the pores of MOFs, giving MOFs a broader luminescent capability. The applications of a variety of LG@MOF sensors, constructed by doping MOFs with LGs such as lanthanide ions, carbon quantum dots, luminescent complexes, organic dyes, and metal nanoclusters, for fluorescence detection of various target analyses such as ions, biomarkers, pesticides, and preservatives are systematically introduced in this review. The development of these sensors for portable visual fluorescence sensing applications is then covered. Finally, the challenges that these sectors currently face, as well as the potential for future growth, are briefly discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Fluorescent Probe Biosensing)
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22 pages, 3754 KiB  
Review
State-of-the-Art Fluorescent Probes: Duplex-Specific Nuclease-Based Strategies for Early Disease Diagnostics
by Ghazala Ashraf, Zi-Tao Zhong, Muhammad Asif, Ayesha Aziz, Tayyaba Iftikhar, Wei Chen and Yuan-Di Zhao
Biosensors 2022, 12(12), 1172; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios12121172 - 15 Dec 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2559
Abstract
Precision healthcare aims to improve patient health by integrating prevention measures with early disease detection for prompt treatments. For the delivery of preventive healthcare, cutting-edge diagnostics that enable early disease detection must be clinically adopted. Duplex-specific nuclease (DSN) is a useful tool for [...] Read more.
Precision healthcare aims to improve patient health by integrating prevention measures with early disease detection for prompt treatments. For the delivery of preventive healthcare, cutting-edge diagnostics that enable early disease detection must be clinically adopted. Duplex-specific nuclease (DSN) is a useful tool for bioanalysis since it can precisely digest DNA contained in duplexes. DSN is commonly used in biomedical and life science applications, including the construction of cDNA libraries, detection of microRNA, and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) recognition. Herein, following the comprehensive introduction to the field, we highlight the clinical applicability, multi-analyte miRNA, and SNP clinical assays for disease diagnosis through large-cohort studies using DSN-based fluorescent methods. In fluorescent platforms, the signal is produced based on the probe (dyes, TaqMan, or molecular beacon) properties in proportion to the target concentration. We outline the reported fluorescent biosensors for SNP detection in the next section. This review aims to capture current knowledge of the overlapping miRNAs and SNPs’ detection that have been widely associated with the pathophysiology of cancer, cardiovascular, neural, and viral diseases. We further highlight the proficiency of DSN-based approaches in complex biological matrices or those constructed on novel nano-architectures. The outlooks on the progress in this field are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Fluorescent Probe Biosensing)
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37 pages, 5956 KiB  
Review
A Comprehensive Review on Upconversion Nanomaterials-Based Fluorescent Sensor for Environment, Biology, Food and Medicine Applications
by Wei Jiang, Jiaqi Yi, Xiaoshuang Li, Fei He, Na Niu and Ligang Chen
Biosensors 2022, 12(11), 1036; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios12111036 - 17 Nov 2022
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3028
Abstract
Near-infrared-excited upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have multicolor emissions, a low auto-fluorescence background, a high chemical stability, and a long fluorescence lifetime. The fluorescent probes based on UCNPs have achieved great success in the analysis of different samples. Here, we presented the research results of [...] Read more.
Near-infrared-excited upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have multicolor emissions, a low auto-fluorescence background, a high chemical stability, and a long fluorescence lifetime. The fluorescent probes based on UCNPs have achieved great success in the analysis of different samples. Here, we presented the research results of UCNPs probes utilized in analytical applications including environment, biology, food and medicine in the last five years; we also introduced the design and construction of upconversion optical sensing platforms. Future trends and challenges of the UCNPs used in the analytical field have also been discussed with particular emphasis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Fluorescent Probe Biosensing)
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