Special Issue "Morphing Aircraft Systems"

A special issue of Biomimetics (ISSN 2313-7673).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Antonio Concilio
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Adaptive Structures, Centro Italiano Ricerche Aerospaziali; 81043 Capua (CE), Italy
Interests: shape memory alloys; piezoelectrics; magnetorehological fluids; shape memory polymers; fibre optics; smart materials; adaptive structures; morphing structures; deployable structures; smart structures; distributed actuator systems; distributed sensor networks; adaptive wings; smart landing gear; de-icing electromechanical systems; noise and vibration control; anti-seismic systems; acoustic antennas; structural health monitoring
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Dr. Rosario Pecora
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Engineering, Aerospace Division, University of Naples "Federico II", Via Claudio 21, 80125 Naples, Italy
Interests: aircraft structures design; aeroelasticity; smart structures and systems; morphing structures; smart materials; structures dynamics; experimental characterization of structures; structures stability; airworthiness and certification
Dr. Ignazio Dimino
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Adaptive Structures, The Italian Aerospace Research Centre (CIRA), Capua, Italy
Interests: adaptive systems; control logics; actuation; topology optimization; structural dynamics; active control systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This issue addresses technology aspects related to the implementation of morphing systems on-board of commercial aircraft. It moves from the augmented performance, following the installation of adaptive surfaces, to the different design approaches needed for this kind of architecture, until arriving at a first estimation of the manufacturing complexities linked to these kinds of devices. Articles are categorized into different sections, so as to give the general reader an almost complete overview of the morphing technology concerning medium-sized aircraft (CS-25):

  1. Industrial perspectives and current needs
  2. Augmented aircraft performance
  3. Morphing systems design:  multiscale modelling; multidisciplinary design; multibody simulations; finite element (FE) simulations; topology optimization; aeroelastic analysis
  4. Morphing systems components: adaptive structures; adaptive skins; integrated actuators; integrated sensors; control systems
  5. Design assessment and exploitation: airworthiness; functional hazard analysis (FHA); scaling issues
  6. Tests: lab tests; wind tunnel tests; flight tests

Dr. Antonio Concilio
Dr. Rosario Pecora
Dr. Ignazio Dimino
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomimetics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • aircraft performance
  • aerodynamics of morphing
  • multiple degree of freedom (MDOF) systems
  • compliant structures
  • mechanical systems
  • kinematic systems
  • smart actuators, electromagnetic actuators (EMA)
  • adaptive skins
  • smart materials
  • smart sensors
  • aerostructural control systems
  • aeroelasticity of morphing
  • topology optimization
  • experimental characterization
  • wind tunnel tests
  • flight tests
  • airworthiness
  • fault and hazard analysis
  • scaling issues

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Design, Manufacturing, and Testing of a New Concept for a Morphing Leading Edge using a Subsonic Blow Down Wind Tunnel
Biomimetics 2019, 4(4), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics4040076 - 02 Dec 2019
Abstract
This paper presents the design and wind tunnel test results of a wing including a morphing leading edge for a medium unmanned aerial vehicle with a maximum wingspan of 5 m. The design of the morphing leading edge system is part of research [...] Read more.
This paper presents the design and wind tunnel test results of a wing including a morphing leading edge for a medium unmanned aerial vehicle with a maximum wingspan of 5 m. The design of the morphing leading edge system is part of research on the design of a morphing camber system. The concept presented here has the advantage of being simple to manufacture (wooden construction) and light for the structure of the wing (compliance mechanism). The morphing leading edge prototype demonstrates the possibility of modifying the stall angle of the wing. In addition, the modification of the stall angle is performed without affecting the slope of the lift coefficient. This prototype is designed to validate the functionality of the deformation method applied to the leading edge of the wing. The mechanism can be further optimized in terms of shape and material to obtain a greater deformation of the leading edge, and, thus, to have a higher impact on the increase of the stall angle than the first prototype of the morphing leading edge presented in this paper. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Morphing Aircraft Systems)
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Open AccessArticle
Fuzzy Logic-Based Control for a Morphing Wing Tip Actuation System: Design, Numerical Simulation, and Wind Tunnel Experimental Testing
Biomimetics 2019, 4(4), 65; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics4040065 - 21 Sep 2019
Abstract
The paper presents the design, numerical simulation, and wind tunnel experimental testing of a fuzzy logic-based control system for a new morphing wing actuation system equipped with Brushless DC (BLDC) motors, under the framework of an international project between Canada and Italy. Morphing [...] Read more.
The paper presents the design, numerical simulation, and wind tunnel experimental testing of a fuzzy logic-based control system for a new morphing wing actuation system equipped with Brushless DC (BLDC) motors, under the framework of an international project between Canada and Italy. Morphing wing is a prime concern of the aviation industry and, due to the promising results, it can improve fuel optimization. In this idea, a major international morphing wing project has been carried out by our university team from Canada, in collaboration with industrial, research, and university entities from our country, but also from Italy, by using a full-scaled portion of a real aircraft wing equipped with an aileron. The target was to conceive, manufacture, and test an experimental wing model able to be morphed in a controlled manner and to provide in this way an extension of the laminar airflow region over its upper surface, producing a drag reduction with direct impact on the fuel consumption economy. The work presented in the paper aims to describe how the experimental model has been developed, controlled, and tested, to prove the feasibility of the morphing wing technology for the next generation of aircraft. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Morphing Aircraft Systems)
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Open AccessArticle
Augmented Aircraft Performance with the Use of Morphing Technology for a Turboprop Regional Aircraft Wing
Biomimetics 2019, 4(3), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics4030064 - 12 Sep 2019
Abstract
This article presents some application of the morphing technology for aerodynamic performance improvement of turboprop regional aircraft. It summarizes the results obtained in the framework of the Clean Sky 2 AIRGREEN2 program for the development and application of dedicated morphing devices for take-off [...] Read more.
This article presents some application of the morphing technology for aerodynamic performance improvement of turboprop regional aircraft. It summarizes the results obtained in the framework of the Clean Sky 2 AIRGREEN2 program for the development and application of dedicated morphing devices for take-off and landing, and their uses in off design conditions. The wing of the reference aircraft configuration considers Natural Laminar Flow (NLF) characteristics. A deformable leading edge morphing device (“droop nose”) and a multi-functional segmented flap system have been considered. For the droop nose, the use of the deformable compliant structure was considered, as it allows a “clean” leading edge when not used, which is mandatory to keep natural laminar flow (NLF) properties at cruise. The use of a segmented flap makes it possible to avoid external flap track fairings, which will lead to performance improvement at cruise. An integrated tracking mechanism is used to set the flap at its take-off optimum setting, and, then, morphing is applied in order to obtain a high-performance level for landing. Lastly, some performance improvements can be obtained in climb conditions by using the last segment of the flap system to modify the load distribution on the wing in order to recover some extended laminar flow on the wing upper surface. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Morphing Aircraft Systems)
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