Biomimetic Architectural and Urban Design 2.0

A special issue of Biomimetics (ISSN 2313-7673). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioinspired Architecture and Climatisation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2022) | Viewed by 12933

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
School of Architecture, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington 6012, New Zealand
Interests: regenerative urban design; biomimicry; climate change adaptation; nature-based solutions and ecosystem services
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

The way we design, construct, and live in buildings and urban environments must change at a great pace and scale and be accompanied by ambitious changes in the theory and practice of architectural and urban design. This Special Issue will investigate how biomimicry can be applied to architectural and urban scales in the design of building materials and components, whole buildings, and cities through the translation and practical application of biological and ecological knowledge, as a way to consider the following questions:

  • How specifically can the practice of biomimetics advance architectural technologies at scales from building materials and component systems, through to holistic building, neighbourhood, and city scales? Can biomimicry work on large urban scales?
  • Can emulating nature be part of built environment responses to the converging drivers of change related to urbanisation, demographic changes in cities, climate change mitigation and adaptation, and biodiversity loss?
  • Can bio-inspired design be used to retrofit existing buildings and cities?
  • How can biomimicry inform regenerative living city agendas so that urban environments become resilient even as context changes?
We invite designers, planners, architects, urban ecologists, and scientists to contribute to a transformation of the built environment by submitting stimulating, speculative, and forward-thinking original research, concepts, and case studies that begin to forge a new way to understand, construct, and live in urban contexts through the emulation of nature.

Dr. Maibritt Pedersen Zari
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomimetics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

31 pages, 10645 KiB  
Article
Site-Specific Bioinspired Architecture—A Case Study of the Allen–Lambe House by Frank Lloyd Wright: The Pragmatic versus the Naturalistic, Intent versus Realization
by Richard Hyde
Biomimetics 2023, 8(2), 178; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics8020178 - 24 Apr 2023
Viewed by 2685
Abstract
Research into biomimetics has focused on science and technology, often developing the innovative parts of buildings from nature, leading to a new field of bioinspired architecture. The work of Frank Lloyd Wright is presented as an early example of bioinspired architecture and explores [...] Read more.
Research into biomimetics has focused on science and technology, often developing the innovative parts of buildings from nature, leading to a new field of bioinspired architecture. The work of Frank Lloyd Wright is presented as an early example of bioinspired architecture and explores how buildings might be more broadly integrated into their site and environment. Integrating architecture, biomimetics and eco-mimesis as a framework to look at the work of Frank Lloyd Wright, provides a new understanding of his architecture and directions for future research into the ecological design of buildings and cities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomimetic Architectural and Urban Design 2.0)
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17 pages, 8356 KiB  
Article
Teaching Nature and Architecture: Student-Led Account of Biomimicry Innovations in the Tropics
by Girirajan Arumugam, Siti Norzaini Zainal Abidin, Camelia May Li Kusumo and Anuj Jain
Biomimetics 2023, 8(1), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics8010013 - 01 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2334
Abstract
The built environment has a huge carbon footprint, and decarbonizing it is essential in driving our sustainability efforts. We take the approach of biomimicry by working with Master of Architecture students from Taylor’s University in Malaysia. The students partake in a 14-week Nature [...] Read more.
The built environment has a huge carbon footprint, and decarbonizing it is essential in driving our sustainability efforts. We take the approach of biomimicry by working with Master of Architecture students from Taylor’s University in Malaysia. The students partake in a 14-week Nature and Architecture design module at the university where they develop biomimicry solutions for the built environment with a focus on sustainability. The students undergo a three-step process of scoping the design problem in the tropical climate and urban context, researching the biological literature, abstracting design ideas, and finally, developing prototypes. The module presents an opportunity for students to study nature and immerse in experiential learning in the megadiverse geographies of Malaysia and wider tropical southeast Asia. This paper describes the student works developed in various module runs from 2017 to 2022 under the supervision of the authors. Selected student projects were analyzed thematically, curated, and classified by frequently occurring themes. Finally, their design implications and challenges faced are presented. We found the following five themes to be most commonly chosen by the students—thermoregulation, structure making, water management, daylighting and ventilation, and transport and mobility. Lastly, we also conducted postgraduation student surveys on their learnings from the module. Through our synthesis, we discuss how student works can bridge the gap of applying biomimicry into practice and the limitations thereof in mainstreaming the practice in the built environment of tropical southeast Asia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomimetic Architectural and Urban Design 2.0)
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15 pages, 4045 KiB  
Article
Urban Biomimicry for Flood Mitigation Using an Ecosystem Service Assessment Tool in Central Wellington, New Zealand
by Maggie MacKinnon, Maibritt Pedersen Zari, Daniel K. Brown, Rubianca Benavidez and Bethanna Jackson
Biomimetics 2023, 8(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics8010009 - 24 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2578
Abstract
Many cities are vulnerable to flooding due to their high proportion of impervious surfaces and lack of vegetated land cover. This vulnerability will often be exacerbated by changing rainfall and storm patterns due to climate change. Using the principles of urban biomimicry, this [...] Read more.
Many cities are vulnerable to flooding due to their high proportion of impervious surfaces and lack of vegetated land cover. This vulnerability will often be exacerbated by changing rainfall and storm patterns due to climate change. Using the principles of urban biomimicry, this study aims to show an ecosystem service-based approach to designing an urban green infrastructure network for stormwater management in densely built areas that more closely emulates natural hydrology processes. Nature Braid (next-generation LUCI) is an ecosystem services assessment tool that was used to simulate flood mitigation ecosystem services in a 13.7 km2 urban water catchment in Wellington, Aotearoa New Zealand. The simulation results revealed that 59% of the catchment does not contain or benefit from flood-mitigating land cover features. Adding 0.6 km2 (4% of the catchment) of green roofs alongside major stormwater flow paths resulted in a nearly three-fold decrease (11%) in the unmitigated flooding area. These results suggest that green roofs could help manage stormwater and mitigate flooding in the densely built areas of the catchment. Using ecosystem service assessment tools, like Nature Braid, can inform the design of more regenerative and resilient urban green infrastructure networks that help mitigate climate change impacts on urban residents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomimetic Architectural and Urban Design 2.0)
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17 pages, 1752 KiB  
Article
Has Biomimicry in Architecture Arrived in France? Diversity of Challenges and Opportunities for a Paradigm Shift
by Estelle Cruz, Eduardo Blanco, Fabienne Aujard and Kalina Raskin
Biomimetics 2022, 7(4), 212; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics7040212 - 23 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2795
Abstract
Biomimicry is a growing field of developing environmental innovations for materials, facade systems, buildings, and urban planning. In France, we observe an extensive diversity of initiatives in biomimicry for the development of regenerative cities. These initiatives blossom in a large range of areas, [...] Read more.
Biomimicry is a growing field of developing environmental innovations for materials, facade systems, buildings, and urban planning. In France, we observe an extensive diversity of initiatives in biomimicry for the development of regenerative cities. These initiatives blossom in a large range of areas, from education to urban policies, to achieve a major environmental, social and economic paradigm shift. To provide a comprehensive understanding of this development at the national scale, this paper presents and discusses the diversity of the developed initiatives over the last 10 years in six main fields-education, urban policies, fundamental and applied research, design demonstrators, arts, and communication. This research is an opportunistic study based on the analysis of these initiatives enriched by the feedback of the stakeholders collected by the authors working in the field of biomimicry over the last seven years. We identify that biomimicry in France has mainly extended through individual initiatives of teachers, territorial authorities, architectural studios, or researchers rather than through the support of public policies. Putting into perspective developments in biomimicry by other countries, this cross-discipline analysis provides recommendations for the extensive development of regenerative architecture and urbanism at the national scale. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomimetic Architectural and Urban Design 2.0)
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15 pages, 5847 KiB  
Article
Energy Absorption Characteristics of Polygonal Bio-Inspired Honeycomb Column Thin-Walled Structure under Quasi-Static Uniaxial Compression Loading
by Shijie Wang, Hongxiang Xia and Yancheng Liu
Biomimetics 2022, 7(4), 201; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics7040201 - 17 Nov 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1508
Abstract
In this paper, we investigated the internal structure of the beetle elytra, i.e., two different structural forms I and II of the bio-inspired honeycomb column thin-walled structures (BHTS) that give the honeycomb sandwich structure frequently used in construction projects better mechanical properties and [...] Read more.
In this paper, we investigated the internal structure of the beetle elytra, i.e., two different structural forms I and II of the bio-inspired honeycomb column thin-walled structures (BHTS) that give the honeycomb sandwich structure frequently used in construction projects better mechanical properties and lightweight performance. BHTS specimens were fabricated by additive manufacturing selective laser melting (AM-SLM) using AlSi10Mg Al-Si alloy. In order to understand the effect of section angle number on BHTS during loading, quasi-static uniaxial compression tests were carried out and verified by numerical simulation. The experimental results showed that in the quasi-static uniaxial compression tests, the number of section angles greatly improved the energy absorption (EA) index of each BHTS: the average value of initial peak crushing force (PCF) of hexagonal BHTS increased by 108.82% and 43.44%, respectively, compared to triangular and rectangular BHTS. The average value of the mean crushing force (MCF) increased by 74.87% and 45.48%, respectively. The average value of EA increased by 89.02% and 46.64%, respectively. The results indicate that the number of section angles can be used as an effective way to enhance the EA of BHTS. This work can provide a reference for the design of high-efficiency energy absorbers and will be widely used in EA scenarios such as construction, transportation, etc. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomimetic Architectural and Urban Design 2.0)
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