Biomimetic Nanotechnology Vol. 3

A special issue of Biomimetics (ISSN 2313-7673). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomimetics of Materials and Structures".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 October 2022) | Viewed by 19689

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biomimetic nanotechnology relates to the most basic aspects of living systems and the transfer of their properties to human applications. Biological materials, structures, and processes are predominantly based on functionalities at the nanoscale. These nanoscale functionalities are often peppered with added components embedded in beautiful hierarchical layers moving from the micro-, through the meso-, and finally to the macroscale. This is of relevance in materials science, medicine, physics, sensor technologies, smart materials science, and many more fields.

Biomimetics of nanoscale features of living systems is highly challenging, interesting, and rewarding—yet because of the inherent multifunctionality of most biological functions, it is sometimes complicated to isolate specific features that are interesting for potential novel applications in technology. Here, both smart approaches and a focus on properly identifying the underlying principles in nature are necessary for us to be able to transfer lessons from living systems to technology, science, engineering, and the arts.

This Special Issue on Biomimetic Nanotechnology calls for contributions from researchers and thinkers in all realms of biomimetic nanotechnology and welcomes theoretical, experimental, and review contributions from biomimeticians, physicists, biologists, material scientists, engineers, and mathematicians alike who are engaged and interested in this fast-growing field. Of specific interest to this Special Issue will be papers that touch upon safe nanotechnology and sustainable biomimetic nanotechnology that facilitates the high potential of this great field in combination with inherent safety for humans and nature.

Because of the dynamic developments in the field of biomimetic nanotechnology and the new interesting contributions we receive, we are glad to inform you that we are continuing the successful series of Biomimetics Special Issues in the field of biomimetic nanotechnology with a volume 3. The focus of this new Special Issue is the contribution of biomimetics and nanotechnology in the age of a global pandemic. 

Prof. Dr. Ille C. Gebeshuber
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biomimetic nanotechnology
  • hierarchical material
  • nanoscale functionalities
  • nanoparticles
  • nanosystems
  • nanostructures
  • nanomaterials
  • programmable materials
  • tunable materials with nanoscale functionalities
  • safe nanotechnology

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Editorial

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10 pages, 1452 KiB  
Editorial
Biomimetic Nanotechnology Vol. 3
by Ille C. Gebeshuber
Biomimetics 2023, 8(1), 102; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics8010102 - 3 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 5373
Abstract
Biomimetic nanotechnology pertains to the fundamental elements of living systems and the translation of their properties into human applications. The underlying functionalities of biological materials, structures and processes are primarily rooted in the nanoscale domain, serving as a source of inspiration for materials [...] Read more.
Biomimetic nanotechnology pertains to the fundamental elements of living systems and the translation of their properties into human applications. The underlying functionalities of biological materials, structures and processes are primarily rooted in the nanoscale domain, serving as a source of inspiration for materials science, medicine, physics, sensor technologies, smart materials science and other interdisciplinary fields. The Biomimetics Special Issues Biomimetic Nanotechnology Vols. 1–3 feature a collection of research and review articles contributed by experts in the field, delving into significant realms of biomimetic nanotechnology. This publication, Vol. 3, comprises four research articles and one review article, which offer valuable insights and inspiration for innovative approaches inspired by Nature’s living systems. The spectrum of the articles is wide and deep and ranges from genetics, traditional medicine, origami, fungi and quartz to green synthesis of nanoparticles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomimetic Nanotechnology Vol. 3)
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Research

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29 pages, 5959 KiB  
Article
Development of Self-Assembled Biomimetic Nanoscale Collagen-like Peptide-Based Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering: An In Silico and Laboratory Study
by Beatriz G. Goncalves, Ryan M. Heise and Ipsita A. Banerjee
Biomimetics 2023, 8(7), 548; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics8070548 - 14 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1888
Abstract
Development of biocomposite scaffolds has gained tremendous attention due to their potential for tissue regeneration. However, most scaffolds often contain animal-derived collagen that may elicit an immunological response, necessitating the development of new biomaterials. Herein, we developed a new collagen-like peptide,(Pro-Ala-His)10 (PAH) [...] Read more.
Development of biocomposite scaffolds has gained tremendous attention due to their potential for tissue regeneration. However, most scaffolds often contain animal-derived collagen that may elicit an immunological response, necessitating the development of new biomaterials. Herein, we developed a new collagen-like peptide,(Pro-Ala-His)10 (PAH)10, and explored its ability to be utilized as a functional biomaterial by incorporating it with a newly synthesized peptide-based self-assembled gel. The gel was prepared by conjugating a pectin derivative, galataric acid, with a pro-angiogenic peptide (LHYQDLLQLQY) and further functionalized with a cortistatin-derived peptide, (Phe-Trp-Lys-Thr)4 (FWKT)4, and the bio-ionic liquid choline acetate. The self-assembly of (PAH)10 and its interactions with the galactarate-peptide conjugates were examined using replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations. Results revealed the formation of a multi-layered scaffold, with enhanced stability at higher temperatures. We then synthesized the scaffold and examined its physicochemical properties and its ability to integrate with aortic smooth muscle cells. The scaffold was further utilized as a bioink for bioprinting to form three-dimensional cell-scaffold matrices. Furthermore, the formation of actin filaments and elongated cell morphology was observed. These results indicate that the (PAH)10 hybrid scaffold provides a suitable environment for cell adhesion, proliferation and growth, making it a potentially valuable biomaterial for tissue engineering. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomimetic Nanotechnology Vol. 3)
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24 pages, 10631 KiB  
Article
Self-Assembly, Self-Folding, and Origami: Comparative Design Principles
by John R. Jungck, Stephen Brittain, Donald Plante and James Flynn
Biomimetics 2023, 8(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics8010012 - 27 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2469
Abstract
Self-assembly is usually considered a parallel process while self-folding and origami are usually considered to be serial processes. We believe that these distinctions do not hold in actual experiments. Based upon our experience with 4D printing, we have developed three additional hybrid classes: [...] Read more.
Self-assembly is usually considered a parallel process while self-folding and origami are usually considered to be serial processes. We believe that these distinctions do not hold in actual experiments. Based upon our experience with 4D printing, we have developed three additional hybrid classes: (1) templated-assisted (tethered) self-assembly: e.g., when RNA is bound to viral capsomeres, the subunits are constricted in their interactions to have aspects of self-folding as well; (2) self-folding can depend upon interactions with the environment; for example, a protein synthesized on a ribosome will fold as soon as peptides enter the intracellular environment in a serial process whereas if denatured complete proteins are put into solution, parallel folding can occur simultaneously; and, (3) in turbulent environments, chaotic conditions continuously alternate processes. We have examined the 43,380 Dürer nets of dodecahedra and 43,380 Dürer nets of icosahedra and their corresponding duals: Schlegel diagrams. In order to better understand models of self-assembly of viral capsids, we have used both geometric (radius of gyration, convex hulls, angles) and topological (vertex connections, leaves, spanning trees, cutting trees, and degree distributions) perspectives to develop design principles for 4D printing experiments. Which configurations fold most rapidly? Which configurations lead to complete polyhedra most of the time? By using Hamiltonian circuits of the vertices of Dürer nets and Eulerian paths of cutting trees of polyhedra unto Schlegel diagrams, we have been able to develop a systematic sampling procedure to explore the 86,760 configurations, models of a T1 viral capsid with 60 subunits and to test alternatives with 4D printing experiments, use of MagformsTM, and origami models to demonstrate via movies the five processes described above. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomimetic Nanotechnology Vol. 3)
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17 pages, 14080 KiB  
Article
Molecularly Designed Ion-Imprinted Nanoparticles for Real-Time Sensing of Cu(II) Ions Using Quartz Crystal Microbalance
by Nihan Aydoğan, Gülgün Aylaz, Monireh Bakhshpour, Tugba Tugsuz and Müge Andaç
Biomimetics 2022, 7(4), 191; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics7040191 - 5 Nov 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1789
Abstract
A molecularly designed imprinting method was combined with a gravimetric nanosensor for the real-time detection Cu(II) ions in aqueous solutions without using expensive laboratory devices. Thus, 1:1 and 2:1 mol-ratio-dependent coordination modes between Cu(II), N-methacyloly-L histidine methyl ester (MAH) functional monomer complexes, and [...] Read more.
A molecularly designed imprinting method was combined with a gravimetric nanosensor for the real-time detection Cu(II) ions in aqueous solutions without using expensive laboratory devices. Thus, 1:1 and 2:1 mol-ratio-dependent coordination modes between Cu(II), N-methacyloly-L histidine methyl ester (MAH) functional monomer complexes, and their four-fold and six-fold coordinations were calculated by means of density functional theory molecular modeling. Cu(II)-MIP1 and Cu(II)-MIP2 nanoparticles were synthesized in the size range of 80–100 nm and characterized by SEM, AFM and FTIR. Cu(II)-MIP nanoparticles were then conducted to a quartz crystal microbalance sensor for the real-time detection of Cu(II) ions in aqueous solutions. The effects of initial Cu(II) concentration, selectivity, and imprinting efficiency were investigated for the optimization of the nanosensor. Linearity of 99% was obtained in the Cu(II) ion linear concentration range of 0.15–1.57 µM with high sensitivity. The LOD was obtained as 40.7 nM for Cu(II)-MIP2 nanoparticles. The selectivity and the imprinting efficiency of the QCM nanosensor were obtained significantly in the presence of competitive ion samples (Co(II), Ni(II), Zn(II), and Fe(II)). The results are promising for sensing Cu(II) ions as environmental toxicants in water by combining molecularly designed ion-imprinted nanoparticles and a gravimetric sensor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomimetic Nanotechnology Vol. 3)
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16 pages, 4388 KiB  
Article
Preparation of Novel Nanoformulation to Enhance Efficacy in the Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease
by Santhoshkumar Jayakodi, Hyunjin Kim, Soumya Menon, Venkat Kumar Shanmugam, Inho Choi, Medidi Raja Sekhar, Rakesh Bhaskar and Sung Soo Han
Biomimetics 2022, 7(4), 189; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics7040189 - 4 Nov 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1895
Abstract
Despite many efforts over the last few decades, cardiac-based drug delivery systems are experiencing major problems, such as the effective delivery of the precise amount of a drug. In the current study, an effort has been made to prepare a nano-herbformulation (NHF) to [...] Read more.
Despite many efforts over the last few decades, cardiac-based drug delivery systems are experiencing major problems, such as the effective delivery of the precise amount of a drug. In the current study, an effort has been made to prepare a nano-herbformulation (NHF) to overcome the major problem of conventional intervention. Copper oxide-based NHF was prepared using plant extract of Alternanthera sessilis and characterized using physicochemical techniques such as Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Dynamic light scattering (DLS), UV-Vis spectroscopy, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). TEM analysis revealed that spherical NHF obtained of size 20–50 nm. In addition, XRD and FTIR confirmed the presence of phytochemicals with biological properties over the surface of copper oxide-based NHF. It was demonstrated that dose-dependent antiapoptotic activity was shown against DOX-induced cardiomyocytes, where ROS levels were significantly reduced to 0.29% from 37.99%. The results of the flow cytometry analysis using PI and Annexin staining further confirmed the antiapoptotic activity of NHF against DOX-induced cardiomyocytes by ROS scavenging. Thus, NHF might be used for cardiovascular disease treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomimetic Nanotechnology Vol. 3)
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12 pages, 32608 KiB  
Article
Effect of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles on Capsular Gene Expression in Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolated from Clinical Samples
by Nuha B. Kudaer, Mohseen H. Risan, Emad Yousif, Mohammed Kadhom, Rasha Raheem and Israa Salman
Biomimetics 2022, 7(4), 180; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics7040180 - 27 Oct 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1780
Abstract
Klebsiella pneumoniae is an opportunistic pathogen with various virulence factors that give it the capability to invade a host. Nevertheless, the treatment of bacterial infection is gradually complicated as the bacteria can develop resistance to antimicrobial agents. As nanotechnology is a prosperous field [...] Read more.
Klebsiella pneumoniae is an opportunistic pathogen with various virulence factors that give it the capability to invade a host. Nevertheless, the treatment of bacterial infection is gradually complicated as the bacteria can develop resistance to antimicrobial agents. As nanotechnology is a prosperous field for researchers, we employed zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) on isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Here, we studied the effect of three NP concentrations—0.25, 0.50, and 0.75 mM—on the gene expression of Klebsiella pneumoniae capsules in isolates collected from different samples. After conducting an anti-bacterial test, the highest nine types of bacteria that resisted the antibacterial agent were chosen for further examination. The gene expression of four genes responsible for capsule manufacturing, namely magA, k2A, rmpA, and kfu, were investigated. When the NP concentration was 0.25 mM, the lowest efficiency was obtained. However, when the concentration increased to 0.50 mM, a noticeable effect on gene expression was detected; consequently, at a concentration of 0.75 Mm, the highest impact was achieved and the gene expression was stopped. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomimetic Nanotechnology Vol. 3)
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Review

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29 pages, 1727 KiB  
Review
Diversity of Biogenic Nanoparticles Obtained by the Fungi-Mediated Synthesis: A Review
by Ekaterina A. Loshchinina, Elena P. Vetchinkina and Maria A. Kupryashina
Biomimetics 2023, 8(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics8010001 - 20 Dec 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3196
Abstract
Fungi are very promising biological objects for the green synthesis of nanoparticles. Biogenic synthesis of nanoparticles using different mycological cultures and substances obtained from them is a promising, easy and environmentally friendly method. By varying the synthesis conditions, the same culture can be [...] Read more.
Fungi are very promising biological objects for the green synthesis of nanoparticles. Biogenic synthesis of nanoparticles using different mycological cultures and substances obtained from them is a promising, easy and environmentally friendly method. By varying the synthesis conditions, the same culture can be used to produce nanoparticles with different sizes, shapes, stability in colloids and, therefore, different biological activity. Fungi are capable of producing a wide range of biologically active compounds and have a powerful enzymatic system that allows them to form nanoparticles of various chemical elements. This review attempts to summarize and provide a comparative analysis of the currently accumulated data, including, among others, our research group’s works, on the variety of the characteristics of the nanoparticles produced by various fungal species, their mycelium, fruiting bodies, extracts and purified fungal metabolites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomimetic Nanotechnology Vol. 3)
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