Advances in Bioceramics for Bone Regeneration

A special issue of Biomimetics (ISSN 2313-7673). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomimetics of Materials and Structures".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2024) | Viewed by 2976

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanics, University Politehnica of Bucharest, BN 002, 313 Splaiul Independentei, Sector 6, 060042 Bucharest, Romania
Interests: numerical simulation of ultrasound propagation; nondestructive ultrasonic technique for biomaterials; sound propagation simulation; nonlinear vibrations; plate vibrations; vibrations in aeronautical structures; finite elements analysis

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Guest Editor
National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor Street, No. 405A, P.O. Box MG 07, 077125 Magurele, Romania
Interests: biomaterials; nanoparticles; hydroxyapatite; biomedical applications; physico-chemical properties
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A biomaterial is a material designed to interact with biological systems for either therapeutic or medical diagnostic purposes. Various biomaterials have been developed for use as synthetic bone graft substitutes, ranging from metals to polymers. However, bioceramics remain the most used material. Furthermore, calcium orthophosphates (CaP), due to their similarity to the mineral phase of bone, are the most widely used. Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is the only CaP that can be obtained both by precipitation in aqueous systems at low temperature and by reaction in the solid state. HAp represents approximately 65% of the weight of bone tissue, but the properties of bone are not only explained by its composition, but also by its complex structure.

In this Special Issue, we aim to bring together interdisciplinary studies focused on research on recent advances in the creation of innovative and functional nanostructured materials that could be used in bone generation.

Prof. Dr. Mihai Valentin Predoi
Dr. Simona Liliana Iconaru
Dr. Carmen Steluta Ciobanu
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • hydroxyapatite
  • calcium phosphate
  • biomaterials
  • bioceramics
  • bone regeneration

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 18476 KiB  
Article
Exploring the Impact of Copper Oxide Substitution on Structure, Morphology, Bioactivity, and Electrical Properties of 45S5 Bioglass®
by Imen Hammami, Manuel Pedro Fernandes Graça, Sílvia Rodrigues Gavinho, Suresh Kumar Jakka, João Paulo Borges, Jorge Carvalho Silva and Luís Cadillon Costa
Biomimetics 2024, 9(4), 213; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics9040213 - 02 Apr 2024
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Abstract
In recent decades, the requirements for implantable medical devices have increased, but the risks of implant rejection still exist. These issues are primarily associated with poor osseointegration, leading to biofilm formation on the implant surface. This study focuses on addressing these issues by [...] Read more.
In recent decades, the requirements for implantable medical devices have increased, but the risks of implant rejection still exist. These issues are primarily associated with poor osseointegration, leading to biofilm formation on the implant surface. This study focuses on addressing these issues by developing a biomaterial for implant coatings. 45S5 bioglass® has been widely used in tissue engineering due to its ability to form a hydroxyapatite layer, ensuring a strong bond between the hard tissue and the bioglass. In this context, 45S5 bioglasses®, modified by the incorporation of different amounts of copper oxide, from 0 to 8 mol%, were synthesized by the melt–quenching technique. The incorporation of Cu ions did not show a significant change in the glass structure. Since the bioglass exhibited the capacity for being polarized, thereby promoting the osseointegration effectiveness, the electrical properties of the prepared samples were studied using the impedance spectroscopy method, in the frequency range of 102–106 Hz and temperature range of 200–400 K. The effects of CuO on charge transport mobility were investigated. Additionally, the bioactivity of the modified bioglasses was evaluated through immersion tests in simulated body fluid. The results revealed the initiation of a Ca–P-rich layer formation on the surface within 24 h, indicating the potential of the bioglasses to enhance the bone regeneration process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bioceramics for Bone Regeneration)
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22 pages, 6382 KiB  
Article
Antimicrobial and Cell-Friendly Properties of Cobalt and Nickel-Doped Tricalcium Phosphate Ceramics
by Dina V. Deyneko, Vladimir N. Lebedev, Katia Barbaro, Vladimir V. Titkov, Bogdan I. Lazoryak, Inna V. Fadeeva, Alevtina N. Gosteva, Irina L. Udyanskaya, Sergey M. Aksenov and Julietta V. Rau
Biomimetics 2024, 9(1), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics9010014 - 31 Dec 2023
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Abstract
β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is widely used as bone implant material. It has been observed that doping the β-TCP structure with certain cations can help in combating bacteria and pathogenic microorganisms. Previous literature investigations have focused on tricalcium phosphate structures with silver, copper, zinc, [...] Read more.
β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is widely used as bone implant material. It has been observed that doping the β-TCP structure with certain cations can help in combating bacteria and pathogenic microorganisms. Previous literature investigations have focused on tricalcium phosphate structures with silver, copper, zinc, and iron cations. However, there are limited studies available on the biological properties of β-TCP containing nickel and cobalt ions. In this work, Ca10.5−xNix(PO4)7 and Ca10.5−xCox(PO4)7 solid solutions with the β-Ca3(PO4)2 structure were synthesized by a high-temperature solid-state reaction. Structural studies revealed the β-TCP structure becomes saturated at 9.5 mol/% for Co2+ or Ni2+ ions. Beyond this saturation point, Ni2+ and Co2+ ions form impurity phases after complete occupying of the octahedral M5 site. The incorporation of these ions into the β-TCP crystal structure delays the phase transition to the α-TCP phase and stabilizes the structure as the temperature increases. Biocompatibility tests conducted on adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (aMSC) using the (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) (MTT) assay showed that all prepared samples did not exhibit cytotoxic effects. Furthermore, there was no inhibition of cell differentiation into the osteogenic lineage. Antibacterial properties were studied on the C. albicans fungus and on E. coli, E. faecalis, S. aureus, and P. aeruginosa bacteria strains. The Ni- and Co-doped β-TCP series exhibited varying degrees of bacterial growth inhibition depending on the doping ion concentration and the specific bacteria strain or fungus. The combination of antibacterial activity and cell-friendly properties makes these phosphates promising candidates for anti-infection bone substitute materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bioceramics for Bone Regeneration)
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Review

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22 pages, 1317 KiB  
Review
The Role of Bioceramics for Bone Regeneration: History, Mechanisms, and Future Perspectives
by Md Amit Hasan Tanvir, Md Abdul Khaleque, Ga-Hyun Kim, Whang-Yong Yoo and Young-Yul Kim
Biomimetics 2024, 9(4), 230; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics9040230 - 12 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder marked by compromised bone integrity, predisposing individuals, particularly older adults and postmenopausal women, to fractures. The advent of bioceramics for bone regeneration has opened up auspicious pathways for addressing osteoporosis. Research indicates that bioceramics can help bones grow [...] Read more.
Osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder marked by compromised bone integrity, predisposing individuals, particularly older adults and postmenopausal women, to fractures. The advent of bioceramics for bone regeneration has opened up auspicious pathways for addressing osteoporosis. Research indicates that bioceramics can help bones grow back by activating bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and wingless/integrated (Wnt)/β-catenin pathways in the body when combined with stem cells, drugs, and other supports. Still, bioceramics have some problems, such as not being flexible enough and prone to breaking, as well as difficulties in growing stem cells and discovering suitable supports for different bone types. While there have been improvements in making bioceramics better for healing bones, it is important to keep looking for new ideas from different areas of medicine to make them even better. By conducting a thorough scrutiny of the pivotal role bioceramics play in facilitating bone regeneration, this review aspires to propel forward the rapidly burgeoning domain of scientific exploration. In the end, this appreciation will contribute to the development of novel bioceramics that enhance bone regrowth and offer patients with bone disorders alternative treatments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bioceramics for Bone Regeneration)
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