Special Issue "Adenoviruses: From Virus to Medicine"

A special issue of Biomedicines (ISSN 2227-9059).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Bernard Klonjkowski

Equipe « Vaccins et Vecteurs adénoviraux », Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire d’Alfort, 7 avenue du Général de Gaulle, 94700 Maisons-Alfort, France
E-Mail
Interests: non-human adenovirus; system vaccinology; innate immunity; antigen design; veterinary vaccine; foot-and-mouth disease; replicative vector; safety and toxicity of adenovirus administration
Guest Editor
Dr. Mitesh J. Borad

Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology Oncology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, 13400 E Shea Blvd, Scottsdale, AZ 85205, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: development/clinical translational of oncolytic virotherapies (including adenoviruses)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue, "Adenoviruses: From Virus to Medicine", will focus on the various aspects of adenoviral biology, at the crossroads of knowledge between pathogens and gene delivery vectors.

Adenoviruses are associated with respiratory, enteric, and ocular diseases. More recently, adenovirus infections have become a major concern in recipients of organs/transplants. Furthermore, biotechnological platforms have been developed for several adenoviruses used in therapeutic and vaccine approaches.

This Special Issue will welcome original and innovative research, or review manuscripts, focusing on the biology of adenovirus infections and adenovirus-based vectors for gene therapy, oncotherapy, or vaccine purposes.

Dr. Bernard Klonjkowski
Dr. Mitesh J. Borad
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomedicines is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • adenovirus

  • gene therapy

  • vaccine

  • oncovirotherapy

  • innate and adaptive immunity

  • assessment of adeno-vector safety

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Review

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Open AccessReview
Progress in Adenoviral Capsid-Display Vaccines
Biomedicines 2018, 6(3), 81; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines6030081
Received: 29 June 2018 / Revised: 20 July 2018 / Accepted: 23 July 2018 / Published: 26 July 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1019 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Adenoviral vectored vaccines against infectious diseases are currently in clinical trials due to their capacity to induce potent antigen-specific B- and T-cell immune responses. Heterologous prime-boost vaccination with adenoviral vector and, for example, adjuvanted protein-based vaccines can further enhance antigen-specific immune responses. Although [...] Read more.
Adenoviral vectored vaccines against infectious diseases are currently in clinical trials due to their capacity to induce potent antigen-specific B- and T-cell immune responses. Heterologous prime-boost vaccination with adenoviral vector and, for example, adjuvanted protein-based vaccines can further enhance antigen-specific immune responses. Although leading to potent immune responses, these heterologous prime-boost regimens may be complex and impact manufacturing costs limiting efficient implementation. Typically, adenoviral vectors are engineered to genetically encode a transgene in the E1 region and utilize the host cell machinery to express the encoded antigen and thereby induce immune responses. Similarly, adenoviral vectors can be engineered to display foreign immunogenic peptides on the capsid-surface by insertion of antigens in capsid proteins hexon, fiber and protein IX. The ability to use adenoviral vectors as antigen-display particles, with or without using the genetic vaccine function, greatly increases the versatility of the adenoviral vector for vaccine development. This review describes the application of adenoviral capsid antigen-display vaccine vectors by focusing on their distinct advantages and possible limitations in vaccine development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adenoviruses: From Virus to Medicine)
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Open AccessReview
Oncolytic Adenoviruses in Gastrointestinal Cancers
Biomedicines 2018, 6(1), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines6010033
Received: 31 January 2018 / Revised: 5 March 2018 / Accepted: 9 March 2018 / Published: 11 March 2018
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Abstract
Gastrointestinal malignancies are challenging cancers with considerable economic and societal impacts on health care systems worldwide. While advances in surgical approaches have provided benefits to a proportion of patients, only modest improvements have been attained in the treatment of patients with advanced disease, [...] Read more.
Gastrointestinal malignancies are challenging cancers with considerable economic and societal impacts on health care systems worldwide. While advances in surgical approaches have provided benefits to a proportion of patients, only modest improvements have been attained in the treatment of patients with advanced disease, resulting in limited improvement in survival rates in these patients. Oncolytic adenoviruses are being developed to address gastrointestinal malignancies. Each platform has evolved to maximize tumor-cell killing potency while minimizing toxicities. Tumor-specific bioengineered adenoviruses using chimeric promoters, prodrug convertase enzymes, lethal genes, tumor suppressor genes, and pseudo-typed capsids can provide the innovations for eventual success of oncolytic virotherapy. This article will review the developments in adenoviral platforms in the context of specific gastrointestinal cancers. From the bench to the implementation of clinical trials, this review aims to highlight advances in the field from its early days to the current state of affairs as it pertains to the application of adenoviral oncolytic therapy to gastrointestinal cancers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adenoviruses: From Virus to Medicine)
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Open AccessReview
The Repertoire of Adenovirus in Human Disease: The Innocuous to the Deadly
Biomedicines 2018, 6(1), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines6010030
Received: 27 January 2018 / Revised: 26 February 2018 / Accepted: 1 March 2018 / Published: 7 March 2018
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (234 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Adenoviridae is a family of double-stranded DNA viruses that are a significant cause of upper respiratory tract infections in children and adults. Less commonly, the adenovirus family can cause a variety of gastrointestinal, ophthalmologic, genitourinary, and neurologic diseases. Most adenovirus infections are self-limited [...] Read more.
Adenoviridae is a family of double-stranded DNA viruses that are a significant cause of upper respiratory tract infections in children and adults. Less commonly, the adenovirus family can cause a variety of gastrointestinal, ophthalmologic, genitourinary, and neurologic diseases. Most adenovirus infections are self-limited in the immunocompetent host and are treated with supportive measures. Fatal infections can occur in immunocompromised patients and less frequently in the healthy. Adenoviral vectors are being studied for novel biomedical applications including gene therapy and immunization. In this review we will focus on the spectrum of adenoviral infections in humans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adenoviruses: From Virus to Medicine)
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Other

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Open AccessReply
Reply to the Comment on: Subrat Khanal et al. The Repertoire of Adenovirus in Human Disease: The Innocuous to the Deadly. Biomedicines 2018, 6, 30
Biomedicines 2019, 7(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines7010010
Received: 11 January 2019 / Accepted: 29 January 2019 / Published: 2 February 2019
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Abstract
We would like to thank Dr [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adenoviruses: From Virus to Medicine)
Open AccessComment
Comment on Khanal et al. The Repertoire of Adenovirus in Human Disease: The Innocuous to the Deadly. Biomedicines 2018, 6, 30
Received: 12 December 2018 / Accepted: 17 January 2019 / Published: 22 January 2019
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Abstract
In their comprehensive review on adenoviruses, Khanal et al. omitted obesity as a disease caused by adenovirus 36 (Adv36). Animal studies have shown that experimental infection with Adv36 causes increased adiposity, and human association studies have shown that prior infection with Adv36 is [...] Read more.
In their comprehensive review on adenoviruses, Khanal et al. omitted obesity as a disease caused by adenovirus 36 (Adv36). Animal studies have shown that experimental infection with Adv36 causes increased adiposity, and human association studies have shown that prior infection with Adv36 is correlated with greater body weight in humans in multiple countries of the world. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adenoviruses: From Virus to Medicine)
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