Special Issue "Regenerative Ophthalmology: From Molecular Basis to Therapy"

A special issue of Biomedicines (ISSN 2227-9059). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular and Translational Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2022 | Viewed by 1688

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Frederic Michon
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Neurosciences of Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier, France
Interests: stem cells
Dr. Paolo Boffano
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Division of Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Eastern Piedmont, University Hospital "Maggiore della Carità", 28100 Novara, Italy
Interests: translational medical research; novel targets in dermatology, ophthalmology, oral and maxillofacial surgery; bone substitutes; cancer; head and neck cancer; surgery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The eye is a complex system composed of various structures and tissues. The synergy between them guarantees proper sight. Because of the different structures, their defects can have several origins, all leading to an impaired vision.

During the last decade, research on ophthalmology has been taking huge leaps forward by uncovering new avenues for clinical applications. With the recent advancements in genomic and molecular medicine, the pathologies hindering sight have never been so thoroughly described, helping clinicians to diagnose and treat patients earlier and faster than ever before. In the scope of this issue, we are presenting an overview of the advancements in the field.

The development of new technologies, such as single-cell resolution -omics, or gene therapy, together with a deeper understanding over the genome and how its organization impacts cellular pathophysiology, provide scientists with a perfect momentum to unravel biological mechanisms underlying pathologies and swiftly propose new clinical avenues to treat affected patients.

This Special Issue of Biomedicines aims at highlighting these new findings, their impacts on disease management, and novel treatment discoveries which aim to retain or even regain sight. In this context, this Special Issue also deciphers the future of the general direction of visual science and tomorrow’s challenges but also possibilities in ocular medicine.

Dr. Frederic Michon
Dr. Paolo Boffano
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomedicines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ophthalmology
  • physiopathology
  • retina
  • optic nerve
  • iris
  • lens
  • cornea
  • tear film
  • single-cell -omics
  • gene therapy

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Cardiac Hypertrophy May Be a Risk Factor for the Development and Severity of Glaucoma
Biomedicines 2022, 10(3), 677; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines10030677 - 15 Mar 2022
Viewed by 685
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between glaucoma and cardiac abnormalities. We evaluated 581 patients with open-angle glaucoma (285 men and 296 women) and 595 individuals without glaucoma (273 men and 322 women). All of the participants underwent visual [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between glaucoma and cardiac abnormalities. We evaluated 581 patients with open-angle glaucoma (285 men and 296 women) and 595 individuals without glaucoma (273 men and 322 women). All of the participants underwent visual field testing using a Humphrey Visual Field Analyzer (30-2 program), an electrocardiogram (ECG), and blood pressure measurement. We examined the ECG abnormalities and other factors (age, intraocular pressure (IOP) and systemic hypertension) involved in the development and severity of glaucoma. Logistic regression analyses revealed significant correlations of glaucoma with IOP (OR = 1.43; 95% CI: 1.36–1.51; p < 0.00001), atrial fibrillation (OR = 2.02; 95% CI: 1.01–4.04; p = 0.04), left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) (OR = 2.21; 95% CI: 1.15–4.25; p = 0.02), and bradycardia (OR = 2.19; 95% CI: 1.25–4.70; p = 0.02). Regression analyses revealed significant correlations of the mean deviation of the visual field with age (t = –6.22; 95% CI: −0.15, −0.08; p < 0.00001), IOP (t = −6.47; 95% CI: −0.42, −0.23; p < 0.00001), and LVH (t = −2.15; 95% CI: −3.36, −0.29; p = 0.02). Atrial fibrillation, LVH and bradycardia may decrease the cerebral blood flow, and may also affect the ocular blood flow. Cardiac abnormalities may be associated with the development and severity of glaucoma. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Regenerative Ophthalmology: From Molecular Basis to Therapy)
Communication
Carbon Monoxide (CO) as a Retinal Regulator of Heme Oxygenases -1, and -2 (HO’s) Expression
Biomedicines 2022, 10(2), 358; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines10020358 - 01 Feb 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 550
Abstract
Carbon monoxide (CO) has been proposed as a chemical light signal and neural system modulator via heme oxygenases -1 and -2 (HO-1 and HO-2). Many papers have proven the CO-HO circuit to be important for such physiological pathways as the molecular biological clock [...] Read more.
Carbon monoxide (CO) has been proposed as a chemical light signal and neural system modulator via heme oxygenases -1 and -2 (HO-1 and HO-2). Many papers have proven the CO-HO circuit to be important for such physiological pathways as the molecular biological clock and the GnRH axis, but also in such pathological occurrences as ischemic injuries, or inflammation as a regenerative and neuroprotective factor. In this in vivo experiment, we used three groups of pigs: control—housed in natural conditions without any procedures; without CO—adapted and kept in constant darkness, infused with blank plasma; and with CO—adapted and kept in constant darkness infused with CO-enriched plasma. After the experiments, each animal was slaughtered and its eyes were collected for further analysis. Quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis were performed to show statistical differences in the expressions between the experimental groups. Our data revealed that exogenous CO is regulator of mRNA transcription for HO-1 and HO-2 and PCNA. Moreover, the mRNA abundance of analyzed factors in the experimental group after CO elevation revealed a restored gene-expression level similar to the control group, which we had observed in the group’s restored protein level after CO elevation. In conclusion, exogenous CO regulates HO’s and PCNA gene expression on transcriptional and translational levels in a similar way as a light cue. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Regenerative Ophthalmology: From Molecular Basis to Therapy)
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