Obesity and Diabetes: Impact on Cancer

A special issue of Biomedicines (ISSN 2227-9059). This special issue belongs to the section "Cancer Biology and Therapeutics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2021) | Viewed by 6465

Special Issue Editor

Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Institute of Experimental Endocrinology and Oncology (IEOS)-URT “Genomic of Diabetes”, Naples, Italy
Interests: adipose tissue; mesenchymal stem cells; breast cancer; obesity; type 2 diabetes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Obesity, diabetes, and cancer are closely linked diseases whose prevalence is increasing rapidly worldwide. A significant body of evidence indicates that metabolic disturbances are associated with cancer incidence, morbidity, and mortality. Obesity influences treatment selection (including chemotherapy dosage) and affects chemotherapy toxicity and surgical complications. However, the biological and molecular mechanisms of this association are yet to be fully identified. Since obesity/diabetes and cancer are heterogeneous disorders with complex and changing pathogenic and clinical features, there are certainly multiple pathways linking these diseases. In particular, metabolic alterations may facilitate carcinogenesis and/or aggressive neoplastic behaviour by i) general-systemic mechanisms that affect all tissues and ii) site specific-local mechanisms affecting the carcinogenesis of a particular organ, with an important involvement in tumour stroma. This Special Issue will focus on understanding the molecular mechanisms (systemic and/or local) that drive metabolic imbalance progressing to cancer development. We are also interested in the discovery of new targets and markers at either the clinical or preclinical level.

Dr. Vittoria D’Esposito
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomedicines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • metabolic alterations and cancer progression (in vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies)
  • metabolic imbalance and drug resistance in cancer
  • epigenetic mechanisms linking obesity/diabetes and cancer
  • impact of “obesogenic” factors (chemical pollutants, diet) on cancer
  • targeting tumour–stroma interaction in dysmetabolic conditions
  • soluble factors (cytokines, chemokines and growth factors) and exosomes in metabolic diseases and cancer

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

14 pages, 3468 KiB  
Article
Peri-Prostatic Adipocyte-Released TGFβ Enhances Prostate Cancer Cell Motility by Upregulation of Connective Tissue Growth Factor
Biomedicines 2021, 9(11), 1692; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines9111692 - 15 Nov 2021
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 1701
Abstract
Periprostatic adipose tissue (PPAT) has emerged as a key player in the prostate cancer (PCa) microenvironment. In this study, we evaluated the ability of PPAT to promote PCa cell migration, as well as the molecular mechanisms involved. Methods: We collected conditioned mediums from [...] Read more.
Periprostatic adipose tissue (PPAT) has emerged as a key player in the prostate cancer (PCa) microenvironment. In this study, we evaluated the ability of PPAT to promote PCa cell migration, as well as the molecular mechanisms involved. Methods: We collected conditioned mediums from in vitro differentiated adipocytes isolated from PPAT taken from PCa patients during radical prostatectomy. Migration was studied by scratch assay. Results: Culture with CM of human PPAT (AdipoCM) promotes migration in two different human androgen-independent (AI) PCa cell lines (DU145 and PC3) and upregulated the expression of CTGF. SB431542, a well-known TGFβ receptor inhibitor, counteracts the increased migration observed in presence of AdipoCM and decreased CTGF expression, suggesting that a paracrine secretion of TGFβ by PPAT affects motility of PCa cells. Conclusions: Collectively, our study showed that factors secreted by PPAT enhanced migration through CTGF upregulation in AI PCa cell lines. These findings reveal the potential of novel therapeutic strategies targeting adipocyte-released factors and TGFβ/CTGF axis to fight advanced PCa dissemination. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Obesity and Diabetes: Impact on Cancer)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 575 KiB  
Article
The Effects of Obesity on Lymphatic Pain and Swelling in Breast Cancer Patients
Biomedicines 2021, 9(7), 818; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines9070818 - 14 Jul 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2205
Abstract
Lymphatic pain and swelling due to lymph fluid accumulation are the most common and debilitating long-term adverse effects of cancer treatment. This study aimed to quantify the effects of obesity on lymphatic pain, arm, and truncal swelling. Methods: A sample of 554 breast [...] Read more.
Lymphatic pain and swelling due to lymph fluid accumulation are the most common and debilitating long-term adverse effects of cancer treatment. This study aimed to quantify the effects of obesity on lymphatic pain, arm, and truncal swelling. Methods: A sample of 554 breast cancer patients were enrolled in the study. Body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage, and body fat mass were measured using a bioimpedance device. Obesity was defined as a BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2. The Breast Cancer and Lymphedema Symptom Experience Index was used to measure lymphatic pain, arm, and truncal swelling. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) to quantify the effects of obesity. Results: Controlling for clinical and demographic characteristics as well as body fat percentage, obesity had the greatest effects on lymphatic pain (OR 3.49, 95% CI 1.87–6.50; p < 0.001) and arm swelling (OR 3.98, 95% CI 1.82–4.43; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Obesity is a significant risk factor for lymphatic pain and arm swelling in breast cancer patients. Obesity, lymphatic pain, and swelling are inflammatory conditions. Future study should explore the inflammatory pathways and understand the molecular mechanisms to find a cure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Obesity and Diabetes: Impact on Cancer)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

17 pages, 602 KiB  
Systematic Review
Is Gestational Diabetes Mellitus a Risk Factor of Maternal Breast Cancer? A Systematic Review of the Literature
Biomedicines 2021, 9(9), 1174; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines9091174 - 07 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1763
Abstract
The association between gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and breast cancer (BC) risk is complex. We aimed to examine this association in a systematic review of the literature. This review was done using the PubMed/Medline and Web of Science databases, in accordance with the [...] Read more.
The association between gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and breast cancer (BC) risk is complex. We aimed to examine this association in a systematic review of the literature. This review was done using the PubMed/Medline and Web of Science databases, in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. The Newcastle–Ottawa Scale was used for the assessment of bias and quality of studies. Only English-language articles published before 1 June 2021, were included. Fourteen studies were included in this systematic review. Among them, eight did not find statistically significant results. Three studies showed a statistically significant increased risk of BC after GDM, and they explained this potential increased risk by hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and low-grade inflammation. However, three studies showed a statistically significant decreased risk of BC after GDM, suggesting a possible protective effect of hormonal changes induced by GDM during pregnancy. These controversial results should be interpreted with caution due to both quantitative and qualitative methodological shortcomings. Further investigations are thus needed in order to gain a better understanding of the associations between GDM and BC, and their underlying mechanisms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Obesity and Diabetes: Impact on Cancer)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop