Special Issue "Coffee and its Consumption: Benefits and Risks"

A special issue of Beverages (ISSN 2306-5710).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 December 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Koushik Adhikari

Food Science & Technology, University of Georgia, Griffin Campus, GA 30223, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sensory analysis; consumer behavior; food product development; food chemistry; sensometrics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Coffee, along with tea, are the two most consumed caffeinated beverages in the world. Coffee is primarily known as a morning drink that people consume to start their day. The popular belief that coffee provides energy to start your day is steeped in the fact that it contains a fair amount of caffeine. Lately, coffee has gained more popularity than ever as a social drink, the world over, mainly because of host of chain and non-chain coffee shops that provide gourmet and specialty coffee drinks.

The objective of this Special Issue is to publish original research and review articles on the various as aspects of coffee. The main aspect that this issue will try to address is the phenolic compounds and other antioxidants present in coffee and their health implications, if any. The effects of various stages in coffee processing on composition and aroma generation is another area that this Special Issue will also try to address. Finally, this issue would like to provide readers with information on the impact of processing on the sensory properties and consumer acceptability of coffee.     

Dr. Koushik Adhikari
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Beverages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Consumer’s Attitude Regarding Soluble Coffee Enriched with Antioxidants
Received: 20 August 2018 / Revised: 8 September 2018 / Accepted: 26 September 2018 / Published: 1 October 2018
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Abstract
Brazil is the second largest coffee consumer in the world. The development of new products related to healthy eating is one of the demands to maintain this scenario. This research aimed to investigate the role of socio-demographic, cognitive and behavioral characteristics on the
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Brazil is the second largest coffee consumer in the world. The development of new products related to healthy eating is one of the demands to maintain this scenario. This research aimed to investigate the role of socio-demographic, cognitive and behavioral characteristics on the acceptance of functional foods by coffee consumers. A questionnaire developed and applied in Belgium was previously translated and validated for application with Brazilian consumers. The habits of coffee consumption, knowledge and interest were investigated regarding functional soluble coffee enriched with antioxidants. The self-administered study was performed with 270 consumers. Acceptance was measured by two items: “Functional foods are all right for me as long as they taste good” and “Functional foods are all right for me even if they taste worse than their conventional counterpart foods”, obtaining a mean score of 4.03 and 2.79 (scale 1: totally disagree and 5: totally agree), respectively. The acceptance of functional foods increased with age, schooling, income, belief in the health benefits and knowledge about functional foods for both items. There was no significant correlation between price and acceptance. With regards to a functional soluble coffee product, the sensory quality was more determinant for its acceptance than price. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coffee and its Consumption: Benefits and Risks)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle The Effects of Storage Temperature on the Aroma of Whole Bean Arabica Coffee Evaluated by Coffee Consumers and HS-SPME-GC-MS
Received: 15 August 2018 / Revised: 30 August 2018 / Accepted: 4 September 2018 / Published: 6 September 2018
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Abstract
Although from a food safety point, coffee is considered a shelf-stable product, changes in volatiles over time due to out-gassing and chemical reactions lead to perceivable differences in coffee aroma and “freshness”. Previous studies have looked at the impact of storage conditions on
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Although from a food safety point, coffee is considered a shelf-stable product, changes in volatiles over time due to out-gassing and chemical reactions lead to perceivable differences in coffee aroma and “freshness”. Previous studies have looked at the impact of storage conditions on ground or brewed coffee. This study seeks to answer the question of how coffee consumers perceive the smell of coffee grounds of whole beans that have been stored under different conditions: freezer vs. room temperature for 9 weeks compared to a newly roasted control (stored for 1 day). Green beans from the same production lot were roasted to two different levels to also evaluate the impact of roast level on aroma changes. Using projective mapping (PM) followed by ultra-flash profiling (UFP), 48 coffee consumers evaluated, using only smell, 6 different freshly ground coffee samples presented in blind duplicates. In parallel, the profiles of 48 previously reported important coffee volatiles were measured by headspace-solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) to relate chemical changes to perceivable sensory aroma changes. Overall, consumer product maps mimicked the instrumental measurements in that the lighter roast coffees showed smaller changes due to storage conditions compared to the dark roast samples. Consumers also perceived the frozen dark roast samples to be more similar to the newly roasted control than the samples stored at room temperature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coffee and its Consumption: Benefits and Risks)
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