Special Issue "New Frontiers in Orofacial Diagnosis and Clinical Approach"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Dentistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Rosalia Maria Leonardi
Website
Guest Editor
Department of General Surgery and Surgical-Medical Specialties, School of Dentistry, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
Interests: digital dentistry; imaging; orthodontics; TMJ disorders; oral pathology; oral cancer; orofacial pain; craniofacial growth; oral health; general health; quality of life
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Advances in dentistry tend to be evolutionary rather than revolutionary. Dental clinicians are called to keep up with all the developments that are occurring simultaneously in this field. In this regard, new technologies are available to enhance the effectiveness of the diagnostic process and increase the spectrum of detectable pathologies, dimorphisms, and dysfunctions in the orofacial region, as well as to the new clinical approach to comprehensive dental care.

Some examples of new specific diagnostic systems are caries detection solutions (transillumination, laser-scanning, or fluorescence), software applications that automate the review of intraoral X-rays, advanced dental shade equipment, oral cancer detection systems, and salivary diagnostic tests. Additionally, digital smile design (DSD), facial scanning, photogrammetry and artificial intelligence (AI) are dramatically changing the diagnostic workflow for the assessment of dental/orofacial disharmonies.  

The aim of this Special Issue is to provide the available evidence-based data of innovative advances and knowledge in oral diagnosis as well as to present the upcoming diagnostic and therapeutic technologies in the orofacial field.

In this regard, clinical and research studies aiming to spread the knowledge of new techniques/advances are welcomed. Studies with new approaches or providing novel information are of higher priority. Case reports and reviews including studies involving the aforementioned topics will also be welcomed.

Prof. Rosalia Maria Leonardi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • CBCT
  • digital workflow
  • 3D
  • periodontology
  • oral surgery
  • biomaterials
  • surface matching
  • rendering
  • desktop scanners
  • intraoral scanners
  • face scanners
  • dynamic articulators
  • software for dentistry
  • CAD/CAM
  • guided surgery
  • custom-made appliance

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Predictive Model for Occlusal Vertical Dimension Determination and Digital Preservation with Three-Dimensional Facial Scanning
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(21), 7890; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10217890 - 06 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 440
Abstract
(1) Background: Occlusal vertical dimension (OVD) in the optimal maxillo–mandibular relationship is an important parameter to establish when complex dental rehabilitation has to be done. The optimal method to measure OVD is still a challenge in everyday practice. The aim of the present [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Occlusal vertical dimension (OVD) in the optimal maxillo–mandibular relationship is an important parameter to establish when complex dental rehabilitation has to be done. The optimal method to measure OVD is still a challenge in everyday practice. The aim of the present study was to test the reliability of the correlation between OVD and some anthropometric and cephalometric methods described in the literature. The validity of OVD registration using a facial scanner was also assessed. (2) Materials and Methods: 150 dentate participants, aged 20–25 years, were randomly selected using sealed envelopes. Anthropometric measurements between specific standard points were performed: Subnasion–Prementon (Sn–PM) and Subnasion–Gnation (Sn–Gn) in maximum intercuspation and in the rest mandibular position, right and left pupil to the corresponding chelion. The cephalometric measurements registered were the lower facial angle and the angle between mandibular and Frankfurt planes. The distance Sn–Gn in maximum intercuspation was compared to all other parameters. Facial scanning, with a mobile phone and installed dedicated application, was performed on ten subjects, randomly selected using the same method among the participants, and the obtained 3D files were analyzed. The digital measurements were compared, for validity, to the clinical measurements. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used, for comparing clinical Sn–Gn in maximum intercuspation position to the other parameters. (3) Results: A strong agreement between all measured anthropometric parameters of the facial scan and clinical contact measurement method was registered. None of the measured parameters could predict the exact OVD. (4) Conclusions: In the limits of our study, the facial scanning could be used for predictable registration of OVD and the stored digital information could be preserved through life and use for oral rehabilitation. However, if OVD needs to be determined, several measurement methods, including cephalometric measurements, need to be used simultaneously to reach a final decision. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Frontiers in Orofacial Diagnosis and Clinical Approach)
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Open AccessArticle
Mesial Rotation of the Upper First Molar: Association with Anterior Dental Crowding in Mixed and Permanent Dentition
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(15), 5301; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10155301 - 31 Jul 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 624
Abstract
The position of the upper first molar (UFM) is currently considered the “key of occlusion”. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of the mesiorotated UFM, and its relationship with anterior dental crowding in mixed and permanent dentition. Intra-oral scans [...] Read more.
The position of the upper first molar (UFM) is currently considered the “key of occlusion”. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of the mesiorotated UFM, and its relationship with anterior dental crowding in mixed and permanent dentition. Intra-oral scans of upper dental arches of 180 subjects with mixed dentition and 169 subjects with permanent dentition were retrospectively analyzed to investigate the presence of UFM mesiopalatal rotation and presence of anterior crowding. The occlusal relationship and the presence of caries were also recorded. In subjects with permanent dentition, there was a statistically significant correlation between anterior crowding and UFM mesiopalatal rotation (Pearson’s chi-square = 9.03; p = 0.06). Among cases with permanent dentition, subjects with UFM mesiopalatal rotation showed an OR = 3.28 (95% CI = 0.99–10.93; p = 0.042) of moderate/severe anterior dental crowding, respect to subjects without UFM rotation. In subjects with mixed dentition, there was a statistically significant correlation between molar occlusal relationship and UFM mesiopalatal rotation (Pearson’s chi-square = 14.98; p = 0.002), and subjects with molar class II showed a OR = 10.2 (95% CI = 2.16–48.22; p = 0.0005) to present UFM mesiopalatal rotation, with respect to subjects with molar class I. UFM mesiopalatal rotation is associated to anterior dental crowding in permanent dentition, and to class II malocclusion in mixed dentition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Frontiers in Orofacial Diagnosis and Clinical Approach)
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