Theoretical, Computational and Experimental Fluid Dynamics: Methods and Advanced Applications

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Fluid Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 June 2024 | Viewed by 2004

Special Issue Editors


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Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Institute of Mathematics and Computational Sciences, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Sao-carlense 400, CP 668, Sao Carlos 13560-970, SP, Brazil
Interests: geometric processing; mesh generation; numerical methods; computational fluid dynamics
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Guest Editor
CEFT-Transport Phenomena Research Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
Interests: theoretical and computational rheology; complex flows of complex fluids; electrokinetics; multiphase flow; micro-combustion
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
1. Department of Mechanical Engineering (Section of Mathematics), FEUP, University of Porto, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
2. Center for Mathematics, University of Minho, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal
Interests: numerical analysis; integro-differential equations; mathematical modelling; viscoelastic flows; anomalous diffusion; machine learning
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue on "Theoretical, Computational and Experimental Fluid Dynamics: Methods and Advanced Applications" aims to summarize new developments in the following areas: theory of fluid dynamics (nem models, analytical solutions and fundamentals); numerical solution of the equations that govern simple and complex flows (finite volume methods, finite element methods, finite difference methods, meshless methods, etc.); experimental studies that involve simple, complex and mixed flows.

All researchers working in these areas are invited to submit their work. All submissions will be subject to a rapid and thorough review.

Prof. Dr. Antonio Castelo Filho
Dr. Alexandre M. Afonso
Dr. Luís L. Ferrás
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • computational fluid dynamics
  • numerical methods
  • experimental work
  • theoretical works on fluids
  • fluid flow

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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26 pages, 11042 KiB  
Article
Physics-Based Swab and Surge Simulations and the Machine Learning Modeling of Field Telemetry Swab Datasets
by Amir Mohammad, Mesfin Belayneh and Reggie Davidrajuh
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(18), 10252; https://doi.org/10.3390/app131810252 - 13 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 884
Abstract
Drilling operations are the major cost factor for the oil industry. Appropriately designed operations are essential for successful drilling. Optimized drilling operations also enhance drilling performance and reduce drilling costs. This is achieved by increasing the bit life (minimizing premature bit wear), drilling [...] Read more.
Drilling operations are the major cost factor for the oil industry. Appropriately designed operations are essential for successful drilling. Optimized drilling operations also enhance drilling performance and reduce drilling costs. This is achieved by increasing the bit life (minimizing premature bit wear), drilling more quickly, which reduces drilling time, and also reducing tripping operations. This paper is presented in two parts. The first part compares the parametric physics-based swab and surge simulation results obtained from the Bingham plastic, power law, and Robertson–Stiff models. The aim is to show how the model’s predictions deviate from each other. Two 80:20 oil/water ratio (OWR) oil-based drilling fluids and two 90:10 OWR oil-based drilling fluids, 1.96 sg and 2.0 sg, were considered in vertical and deviated wells. Analysis of the simulation results revealed that the deviations depend on the drilling fluid’s physical and rheological parameters as well as the well trajectory. Moreover, the model’s predictions were inconsistent. Data-driven machine learning (ML) modeling is the focus of the second section. Data-driven modeling was performed using both software-generated datasets and field datasets. The results show that the random forest regressor (RF), artificial neural network (ANN), long short-term memory (LSTM), LightGBM, XGBoost, and multivariate regression models predicted the training and test datasets with higher R-squared and minimum mean square error values. Deploying the ML model in real-time applications and the planning phase would lead to potential applications of artificial intelligence for well planning and optimization processes. Full article
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Review

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23 pages, 2095 KiB  
Review
Review of Mechanisms and Suppression Methods for Low-Frequency Pressure Fluctuations in Open-Jet Wind Tunnels
by Ling Jin, Xiao Bing Deng, Xunnian Wang, Junlong Zhang and Weiping Zeng
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(19), 10808; https://doi.org/10.3390/app131910808 - 28 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 705
Abstract
Low-frequency pressure fluctuations are common in open-jet wind tunnels, affecting test accuracy and posing safety risks to the wind tunnels. These oscillations can be caused by different mechanisms in different wind tunnels, and it is often necessary to identify the specific mechanism responsible [...] Read more.
Low-frequency pressure fluctuations are common in open-jet wind tunnels, affecting test accuracy and posing safety risks to the wind tunnels. These oscillations can be caused by different mechanisms in different wind tunnels, and it is often necessary to identify the specific mechanism responsible for the oscillation and develop appropriate control methods. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the current state of research on low-frequency pressure fluctuations in subsonic open-jet wind tunnels, with a particular emphasis on their generation mechanisms and control strategies. The primary source of excitation is attributed to the edgetone feedback formed by the impingement of the jet on the collector. The sound wavelength corresponding to the edgetone frequency is close to that of the plenum scale, facilitating resonance with both plenum-associated vibration modes and specific-order standing wave modes within the circuit loop, resulting in significant low-frequency pulsations. Passive control methods such as nozzle vortex generators and collector breathing gaps have been extensively employed due to their cost-effectiveness and efficiency. The concluding section highlights some unresolved issues that require further investigation in this field. Full article
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