Special Issue "Oxidative Stress, DNA Damage and Biological Clinical Effects"

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 December 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Alexandros G. Georgakilas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
DNA Damage Laboratory, Physics Department, School of Applied Mathematical and Physical Sciences, National Technical University of Athens, Zografou Campus, 15780 Athens, Greece
Interests: radiation biology; cancer biology; DNA damage and repair; oxidative stress; Carcinogenesis; bioinformatics; systems biology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The exposure of cells and organisms to oxidative stress is an everyday parameter built into their life and evolution for thousands or even millions of years. From simple cellular systems to complex biological systems like tissues or organs, it is important to know how each system responds to oxidative injury to DNA, proteins, or lipids. In addition, which are the biological defense mechanisms and the final short- and long-term effects? Are there any methodologies to follow these late effects?

Authors are invited to submit manuscripts dealing with the mechanisms or phenomena that can lead to any type of oxidative lesions in any biological system, or even methods papers. We live in the era of omics, therefore, teams working on this field by the means of bioinformatics and any type of omics are welcome.

Nowadays, most people accept the notion that we are what we eat. Groups working on natural antioxidants and on the role of nutrition in the overall oxidative stress status are also invited to contribute a research or review paper.

Last, but not least, intriguing questions have been raised over the last years related to the possible applications of all of the above knowledge in the clinic towards the cure or beneficial treatment of various diseases.

Prof. Dr. Alexandros Georgakilas
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Oxidative stress
  • Cellular damage
  • Biological effects of oxidation
  • Response to damage
  • Antioxidants
  • Repair of DNA, proteins, and lipids
  • Bioinformatics
  • Clinical effects of cellular oxidation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Targeting G-quadruplexes with Organic Dyes: Chelerythrine–DNA Binding Elucidated by Combining Molecular Modeling and Optical Spectroscopy
Antioxidants 2019, 8(10), 472; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8100472 - 10 Oct 2019
Abstract
The DNA-binding of the natural benzophenanthridine alkaloid chelerythrine (CHE) has been assessed by combining molecular modeling and optical absorption spectroscopy. Specifically, both double-helical (B-DNA) and G-quadruplex sequences—representative of different topologies and possessing biological relevance, such as telomeric or regulatory sequences—have been considered. An [...] Read more.
The DNA-binding of the natural benzophenanthridine alkaloid chelerythrine (CHE) has been assessed by combining molecular modeling and optical absorption spectroscopy. Specifically, both double-helical (B-DNA) and G-quadruplex sequences—representative of different topologies and possessing biological relevance, such as telomeric or regulatory sequences—have been considered. An original multiscale protocol, making use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations, allowed us to compare the theoretical and experimental circular dichroism spectra of the different DNA topologies, readily providing atomic-level details of the CHE–DNA binding modes. The binding selectivity towards G-quadruplexes is confirmed by both experimental and theoretical determination of the binding free energies. Overall, our mixed computational and experimental approach is able to shed light on the interaction of small molecules with different DNA conformations. In particular, CHE may be seen as the building block of promising drug candidates specifically targeting G-quadruplexes for both antitumoral and antiviral purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress, DNA Damage and Biological Clinical Effects)
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Open AccessArticle
Human DNA Telomeres in Presence of Oxidative Lesions: The Crucial Role of Electrostatic Interactions on the Stability of Guanine Quadruplexes
Antioxidants 2019, 8(9), 337; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8090337 - 22 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
By using all atom molecular dynamics simulations, we studied the behavior of human DNA telomere sequences in guanine quadruplex (G4) conformation and in the presence of oxidative lesions, namely abasic sites. In particular, we evidenced that while removing one guanine base induces a [...] Read more.
By using all atom molecular dynamics simulations, we studied the behavior of human DNA telomere sequences in guanine quadruplex (G4) conformation and in the presence of oxidative lesions, namely abasic sites. In particular, we evidenced that while removing one guanine base induces a significant alteration and destabilization of the involved leaflet, human telomere oligomers tend, in most cases, to maintain at least a partial quadruplex structure, eventually by replacing the empty site with undamaged guanines of different leaflets. This study shows that (i) the disruption of the quadruplex leaflets induces the release of at least one of the potassium cations embedded in the quadruplex channel and that (ii) the electrostatic interactions of the DNA sequence with the aforementioned cations are fundamental to the maintenance of the global quadruplex structure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress, DNA Damage and Biological Clinical Effects)
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