Special Issue "Nanomaterial Oxidative Stress"

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2017).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Vytas Reipa
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Biosystems and Biomaterials Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Dr., Gaithersburg, MD, USA
Interests: redox homeostasis; nanomaterial interactions with biological systems; oxidative stress; measurement issues

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanomaterials (NMs) are defined as having components of at least one dimension between 1 nm and 100 nm (ISO/TS 80004-1), and include both manufactured and naturally occurring substances. Along with their unique properties, it was acknowledged early on that NMs could also have elevated toxicity. Redox properties of nanomaterials are intimately related to their toxic effects, and the induction of oxidative stress and subsequent inflammation is currently the main mechanistic paradigm of nanotoxicity. NMs could induce oxidative stress via a number of pathways. For example, generation of reactive oxygen species could result from the formation of electron hole pairs by photoactivation of some semiconductor nano-materials.  In addition, dissolution of NMs releasing metal ions and the presence of transition metals such as Fe, Ni, Cu, Co, and Cr on the nanomaterial surface can generate hydroxyl radicals via the Fenton reaction. Finally, due to their uptake by cells, even inert NMs could give rise to ROS production by perturbing the mitochondria function and intracellular redox equilibria.

On the other hand, there is evidence that some nanomaterials have pronounced antioxidant properties. This Special Issue will highlight the complexity of NM-induced oxidative stress in biological systems, as well efforts to detect, measure, and alleviate its damaging consequences.

Dr. Vytas Reipa
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


 

Keywords

  • nanomaterials
  • Nanotoxicity
  • oxidative stress
  • reactive oxygen species
  • redox homeostasis
  • antioxidants
  • fenton reaction

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

Article
Green Synthesized Zinc Oxide (ZnO) Nanoparticles Induce Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage in Lathyrus sativus L. Root Bioassay System
Antioxidants 2017, 6(2), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox6020035 - 18 May 2017
Cited by 29 | Viewed by 4916
Abstract
Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONP-GS) were synthesised from the precursor zinc acetate (Zn(CH3COO)2) through the green route using the milky latex from milk weed (Calotropis gigantea L. R. Br) by alkaline precipitation. Formation of the ZnONP-GS was monitored by [...] Read more.
Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONP-GS) were synthesised from the precursor zinc acetate (Zn(CH3COO)2) through the green route using the milky latex from milk weed (Calotropis gigantea L. R. Br) by alkaline precipitation. Formation of the ZnONP-GS was monitored by UV-visible spectroscopy followed by characterization and confirmation by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Both the ZnONP-GS and the commercially available ZnONP-S (Sigma-Aldrich) and cationic Zn2+ from Zn(CH3COO)2 were tested in a dose range of 0–100 mg·L−1 for their potency (i) to induce oxidative stress as measured by the generation reactive oxygen species (ROS: O2•−, H2O2 and OH), cell death, and lipid peroxidation; (ii) to modulate the activities of antioxidant enzymes: catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX); and (iii) to cause DNA damage as determined by Comet assay in Lathyrus sativus L. root bioassay system. Antioxidants such as Tiron and dimethylthiourea significantly attenuated the ZnONP-induced oxidative and DNA damage, suggesting the involvement of ROS therein. Our study demonstrated that both ZnONP-GS and ZnONP-S induced oxidative stress and DNA damage to a similar extent but were significantly less potent than Zn2+ alone. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterial Oxidative Stress)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Comparison of the Pulmonary Oxidative Stress Caused by Intratracheal Instillation and Inhalation of NiO Nanoparticles when Equivalent Amounts of NiO Are Retained in the Lung
Antioxidants 2016, 5(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox5010004 - 18 Jan 2016
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 3372
Abstract
NiO nanoparticles were administered to rat lungs via intratracheal instillation or inhalation. During pulmonary toxicity caused by NiO nanoparticles, the induction of oxidative stress is a major factor. Both intratracheal instillation and inhalation of NiO nanoparticles induced pulmonary oxidative stress. The oxidative stress [...] Read more.
NiO nanoparticles were administered to rat lungs via intratracheal instillation or inhalation. During pulmonary toxicity caused by NiO nanoparticles, the induction of oxidative stress is a major factor. Both intratracheal instillation and inhalation of NiO nanoparticles induced pulmonary oxidative stress. The oxidative stress response protein, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), was induced by the administration of NiO nanoparticles at both the protein and gene expression level. Additionally, certain oxidative-stress markers in the lung, such as 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α, thioredoxin, and inducible nitric oxide synthase were increased. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the lung was also increased by the administration of NiO nanoparticles. When the amount of NiO in the lung is similar, the responses against pulmonary oxidative stress of intratracheal instillation and inhalation are also similar. However, the state of pulmonary oxidative stress in the early phase was different between intratracheal instillation and inhalation, even if the amount of NiO in the lung was similar. Inhalation causes milder oxidative stress than that caused by intratracheal instillation. On evaluation of the nanoparticle-induced pulmonary oxidative stress in the early phase, we should understand the different states of oxidative stress induced by intratracheal instillation and inhalation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterial Oxidative Stress)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

Review
Antioxidant Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Biology and Medicine
Antioxidants 2016, 5(2), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox5020015 - 17 May 2016
Cited by 198 | Viewed by 8519
Abstract
Previously, catalytic cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs, nanoceria, CeO2-x NPs) have been widely utilized for chemical mechanical planarization in the semiconductor industry and for reducing harmful emissions and improving fuel combustion efficiency in the automobile industry. Researchers are now harnessing the catalytic repertoire of [...] Read more.
Previously, catalytic cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs, nanoceria, CeO2-x NPs) have been widely utilized for chemical mechanical planarization in the semiconductor industry and for reducing harmful emissions and improving fuel combustion efficiency in the automobile industry. Researchers are now harnessing the catalytic repertoire of CNPs to develop potential new treatment modalities for both oxidative- and nitrosative-stress induced disorders and diseases. In order to reach the point where our experimental understanding of the antioxidant activity of CNPs can be translated into useful therapeutics in the clinic, it is necessary to evaluate the most current evidence that supports CNP antioxidant activity in biological systems. Accordingly, the aims of this review are three-fold: (1) To describe the putative reaction mechanisms and physicochemical surface properties that enable CNPs to both scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) and to act as antioxidant enzyme-like mimetics in solution; (2) To provide an overview, with commentary, regarding the most robust design and synthesis pathways for preparing CNPs with catalytic antioxidant activity; (3) To provide the reader with the most up-to-date in vitro and in vivo experimental evidence supporting the ROS-scavenging potential of CNPs in biology and medicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterial Oxidative Stress)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

Technical Note
Electrochemical Potential Gradient as a Quantitative in Vitro Test Platform for Cellular Oxidative Stress
Antioxidants 2016, 5(3), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox5030023 - 11 Jul 2016
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3147
Abstract
Oxidative stress in a biological system is often defined as a redox imbalance within cells or groups of cells within an organism. Reductive-oxidative (redox) imbalances in cellular systems have been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer. To better understand the redox environment [...] Read more.
Oxidative stress in a biological system is often defined as a redox imbalance within cells or groups of cells within an organism. Reductive-oxidative (redox) imbalances in cellular systems have been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer. To better understand the redox environment within cellular systems, it is important to be able to characterize the relationship between the intensity of the oxidative environment, characterized by redox potential, and the biomolecular consequences of oxidative damage. In this study, we show that an in situ electrochemical potential gradient can serve as a tool to simulate exogenous oxidative stress in surface-attached mammalian cells. A culture plate design, which permits direct imaging and analysis of the cell viability, following exposure to a range of solution redox potentials, was developed. The in vitro oxidative stress test vessel consists of a cell growth flask fitted with two platinum electrodes that support a direct current along the flask bottom. The applied potential span and gradient slope can be controlled by adjusting the constant current magnitude across the vessel with spatially localized media potentials measured with a sliding reference electrode. For example, the viability of Chinese Hamster Ovary cells under a gradient of redox potentials indicated that cell death was initiated at approximately 0.4 V vs. standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) media potential and this potential could be modified with antioxidants. This experimental platform may facilitate studies of oxidative stress characteristics on different types of cells by enabling imaging live cell cultures that have been exposed to a gradient of exogenous redox potentials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterial Oxidative Stress)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop