Special Issue "Antioxidants in Veterinary Medicine"

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Paola Badino
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Università degli Studi di Torino, Turin, Italy
Interests: antioxidants; mycotoxins; dioxins; pharmaco and toxicodynamics; metabolizing aenzymes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As in Human Medicine, antioxidants are widely used in Veterinary Medicine for different purposes in both food-producing animals and pets. Nowadays, together with the more classical examples, such as selenium and vitamin E, the supplement of the animal diet with phytogenic additives rich in flavonoids, phenolic acids and lignans is widely investigated by the scientific community.

In food-producing animals, antioxidants can improve not only the animal’s health but also can offer a suitable tool to ameliorate the quality of the deriving foodstuffs. Additionally, in the scientific literature, several papers related to the possible protective effects exerted by natural antioxidants on reducing the toxic effects of mycotoxins are reported. Furthermore, antioxidants have been used in small animal practice for the treatments of conditions related to the redox imbalance (e.g., osteoarthritis, canine cognitive dysfunction, renal failure) or to counteract the side effects of certain drugs (e.g., the thyrostatic methimazole).

As the interest on this topic is increasing, I am pleased to invite you to submit your current research findings or a review article in this Special Issue, focused on the role of antioxidants in Veterinary Medicine from the clinical point of view, as well as through the investigation of their mechanisms of action. For these reasons, the submitted papers can deal with both in vitro and in vivo studies related to the antioxidant supplementation in the diet of food-producing animals and pets.

Prof. Paola Badino
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Redox unbalance
  • Companion animals
  • Large animals
  • Food and feed quality and safety
  • Feed and pet-food additives

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Changes in Plasma Fatty Acids, Free Amino Acids, Antioxidant Defense, and Physiological Stress by Oleuropein Supplementation in Pigs Prior to Slaughter
Antioxidants 2020, 9(1), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9010056 - 08 Jan 2020
Abstract
Olive tree leaves are characterized for having not only a potent antioxidant power but also effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. The impact of the individual oleuropein (OLE), vitamin E + Se (VE), or a combined supplementation of oleuropein, vitamin E, and selenium [...] Read more.
Olive tree leaves are characterized for having not only a potent antioxidant power but also effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. The impact of the individual oleuropein (OLE), vitamin E + Se (VE), or a combined supplementation of oleuropein, vitamin E, and selenium (VEOLE) was evaluated on pig plasma metabolites under fasting prior to slaughter. VEOLE and OLE had lesser n-3 plasma polyunsaturated fatty acids and greater monounsaturated free fatty acids compared to control. The n-3-fatty acid mobilization was directly correlated with greater cystine and inversely with oxidized glutathione/reduced glutathione (GSSH/GSH) levels. This faster use of n-3 fatty acids might act as an indicator of glutathione synthesis mediated by an increase of cystine in plasma. Different correlations and linear adjustments were observed between plasma antioxidant power and free cystine, free glycine, free glutamine, monounsaturated free fatty acids, and total n-3. The best response to stress was found in VEOLE. Cortisol reached the greatest positive correlation with plasma total n-3 fatty acids, which suggests a faster uptake of n-3 for biological functions such as stress control or energy supply in the brain. From a practical point of view, an enhanced oxidative status as well as control of physiological stress prior to slaughter by the combined antioxidants supplementation might have positive effects on pork quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidants in Veterinary Medicine)
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Open AccessArticle
Evaluation of Antioxidant Supplementation on Redox Unbalance in Hyperthyroid Cats Treated with Methimazole: A Blinded Randomized Controlled Trial
Antioxidants 2020, 9(1), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9010015 - 23 Dec 2019
Abstract
Methimazole (MMI) is often the selected medical treatment for feline hyperthyroidism. However, the onset of MMI-related side effects (MMI-SE) is likely caused by oxidative stress. This study evaluated the dietary supplementation of selected antioxidants in hyperthyroid cats receiving MMI, to reduce MMI-SE. Thirty [...] Read more.
Methimazole (MMI) is often the selected medical treatment for feline hyperthyroidism. However, the onset of MMI-related side effects (MMI-SE) is likely caused by oxidative stress. This study evaluated the dietary supplementation of selected antioxidants in hyperthyroid cats receiving MMI, to reduce MMI-SE. Thirty hyperthyroid client-owned cats were randomly allocated in group M (MMI + placebo) or group M+A (MMI + antioxidants). At different time-points from the enrolment (ET) to the end of the trial (FT), the following information was recorded: clinical findings, complete blood count, serum biochemical parameters, urinalysis, total plasma thyroxine concentrations, determinable reactive oxygen metabolites (dROMs), OXY-adsorbent test values, and oxidative stress index (OSi) values, and MMI-SE. dROMs and OSi values significantly increased from ET to FT in group M and were significantly higher in group M than in group M+A at FT. Likewise, OXY-absorbent test values were significantly higher in group M+A than in group M at FT. Moreover, the occurrence rate of MMI-SE in group M+A was lower than in group M. In conclusion, our results show that the dietary supplementation of antioxidants in hyperthyroid cats receiving MMI exerts a protective effect against oxidative stress, likely contributing to the reduction of MMI-SE. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidants in Veterinary Medicine)
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