Special Issue "Redox Balance in Animal Physiology"

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Pietro Celi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Global Science Lead Eubiotics, DSM Nutritional Products, 6480 Dobbin Road Columbia, Maryland 21045, USA
Tel. +1 443/542 2122
Interests: animal physiology; animals nutrition; animal reproduction; gastrointestinal functionality; Ruminant Health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Antioxidants play a crucial role in animal physiology and health. Animal health is vital for sustainable animal production systems, and this area of research is now attracting international interest, especially in relation to the mechanisms by which redox balance may influence metabolism, health and welfare. Considering the complexity of the interactions between antioxidants and body systems (genome, proteome, and metabolome), it is feasible that a comprehensive analysis of antioxidants/animal interactions is required to achieve a systematic understanding of the effects of antioxidant supplementation in animals’ diets.

This Special Issue welcomes original research and reviews of literature concerning the role of redox balance in the following areas:

  • Oxidative stress biomarkers
  • Animal health and diseases
  • Immune function
  • Inflammation
  • Animal metabolism
  • Animal nutrition
  • Animal reproduction
  • Mammary gland physiology
  • Neonatal physiology
  • Gastrointestinal functionality
  • Respiratory physiology
  • Environmental stress
  • Animal welfare
  • Transport stress

Dr. Pietro Celi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Redox Balance
  • Antioxidants
  • Oxidative stress
  • Physiology
  • Gastrointestinal functionality
  • Reproduction
  • Metabolism
  • Welfare
  • Heat Stress
  • Nutrition

Published Papers (7 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Dietary Quercetin on the Glutathione Redox System and Small Intestinal Functionality of Weaned Piglets
Antioxidants 2019, 8(8), 312; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8080312 - 16 Aug 2019
Abstract
Quercetin has been shown to alleviate mucosal damage and modulate the glutathione (GSH) redox system in the colon of rodents. In the current study, we assessed whether quercetin was able to mitigate small intestinal dysfunction in weaned pigs. Here, 224 weaned piglets were [...] Read more.
Quercetin has been shown to alleviate mucosal damage and modulate the glutathione (GSH) redox system in the colon of rodents. In the current study, we assessed whether quercetin was able to mitigate small intestinal dysfunction in weaned pigs. Here, 224 weaned piglets were fed a diet containing quercetin at either 0, 100, 300, or 900 mg/kg diet until d14 post-weaning, followed by a common basal diet until d42. Eight animals per treatment were sampled at d5 and d14 post-weaning. In these animals, the small intestinal histomorphology, barrier function, and protein abundance of occludin, caspase-3, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen were assessed. None of these parameters were affected, and neither did quercetin improve performance up to d42 post-weaning. The GSH redox system was evaluated in blood, small intestinal mucosa, and liver. Quercetin did not affect the glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and glutamate–cysteine ligase activity in these tissues. In contrast, the hepatic glutathione transferase (GST) activity was significantly increased by quercetin supplementation at d5 post-weaning of 100, 300, and 900 mg/kg. Importantly, d5 was characterized by a more oxidized GSH redox status. To conclude, dietary quercetin had little effect on the small intestine, but did upregulate hepatic GST in the occurrence of redox disturbance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Redox Balance in Animal Physiology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Dietary Supplementation of Yerba Mate (Ilex paraguariensis) during the Dry Period Improves Redox Balance in Lactating Dairy Cows
Antioxidants 2019, 8(2), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8020038 - 09 Feb 2019
Abstract
Thirty-six pregnant Holstein–Friesian cows were used to study the effect of Yerba Mate (YM) supplementation during the dry period on redox balance. The treatments groups were Control (no YM), YM 250 (250 g/cow/day), and YM 500 (500 g/cow/day). Blood samples were obtained 30 [...] Read more.
Thirty-six pregnant Holstein–Friesian cows were used to study the effect of Yerba Mate (YM) supplementation during the dry period on redox balance. The treatments groups were Control (no YM), YM 250 (250 g/cow/day), and YM 500 (500 g/cow/day). Blood samples were obtained 30 days prepartum, at calving, and monthly postpartum until four months post calving. Liveweight (LW) and body condition score (BCS) were assessed prepartum, at calving, and then postpartum monthly until the end of the trial. Plasma was analyzed for hydroperoxides (d-ROMs), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), and biological antioxidant potential (BAP). The oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated as OSI = ROMs/BAP × 100. Cows were milked twice daily, and milk yield data were recorded daily. Redox balance was improved by YM supplementation, as reflected in the lower OSI values observed in the YM groups. Yerba Mate supplementation significantly affected LW, but did not affect BCS. Milk yield averaged 28.1 ± 0.40, 29.0 ± 0.48, and 29.9 ± 0.46 L/cow/day in the Control, YM 250, and YM 500 groups, respectively, but was not significant. Nutritional manipulation during the dry period with Yerba Mate has demonstrated the potential to improve redox balance and milk yield. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Redox Balance in Animal Physiology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Effects of N-Acetyl-Cysteine Supplementation through Drinking Water on the Glutathione Redox Status during the Weaning Transition of Piglets
Antioxidants 2019, 8(1), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8010024 - 16 Jan 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
This study investigated the effect of N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) supplementation through drinking water on animal performance and the glutathione (GSH) redox system in weaned piglets, particularly in relation to the immediate post-weaning feed intake. To this end, 168 piglets were weaned and either [...] Read more.
This study investigated the effect of N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) supplementation through drinking water on animal performance and the glutathione (GSH) redox system in weaned piglets, particularly in relation to the immediate post-weaning feed intake. To this end, 168 piglets were weaned and either fed ad libitum or fasted the first two days, and either or not administered 200 mg/L NAC via the drinking water until d14 post-weaning. Next to animal performance until day 42 (d42), the GSH redox system was measured in erythrocytes, small intestinal mucosa, liver, lung, and kidney tissue at d0, d2, and d14 post-weaning. Animal performance and GSH levels were not affected by NAC, nor by fasting. Irrespective of treatment, a significant drop in GSH at d2 post-weaning was found as compared to d0, in particular in liver (−69%), distal jejunal mucosa (−72%), and lung tissue (−80%). Post-weaning changes of the GSH redox status were strongly tissue-dependent. To conclude, this research indicates that GSH redox homeostasis was largely affected in multiple organs during the weaning transition. NAC supplementation did not increase GSH levels in any tissue, not even in fasted animals, questioning the fact if cysteine is the first or only limiting factor determining the rate of GSH synthesis in the early post-weaning phase. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Redox Balance in Animal Physiology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Relationship between Protein Oxidation Biomarkers and Uterine Health in Dairy Cows during the Postpartum Period
Antioxidants 2019, 8(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8010021 - 14 Jan 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
High neutrophil (PMN, Polymorphonuclear neutrophil) counts in the endometrium of cows affected by endometritis, suggests the involvement of oxidative stress (OS) among the causes of impaired fertility. Protein oxidation, in particular, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), are OS biomarkers linked to PMN activity. [...] Read more.
High neutrophil (PMN, Polymorphonuclear neutrophil) counts in the endometrium of cows affected by endometritis, suggests the involvement of oxidative stress (OS) among the causes of impaired fertility. Protein oxidation, in particular, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), are OS biomarkers linked to PMN activity. To test this hypothesis, the relationship between protein oxidation and uterus health was studied in thirty-eight dairy cows during the puerperium. The animals were found to be cycling, without any signs of disease and pharmacological treatments. PMN count was performed either through a cytobrush or a uterine horn lavage (UHL). Cows were classified into four groups, based on the uterine ultrasonographic characteristics and the PMN percentage in the uterine horns with a higher percentage of high neutrophil horn (HNH). They were classified as: Healthy (H); Subclinical Endometritis (SCE); Grade 1 Endometritis (EM1); and Grade 2 Endometritis (EM2). AOPP and carbonyls were measured in plasma and UHL. UHL samples underwent Western blot analysis to visualize the carbonyl and dityrosine formation. Plasma AOPP were higher (p < 0.05) in EM2. AOPP and carbonyl group concentrations were higher in the HNH samples (p < 0.05). Protein concentration in the UHL was higher in the EM2 (p < 0.05). Carbonyl and dityrosine formation was more intense in EM1 and EM2. Protein oxidation observed in the EM2 suggests the presence of an inflammatory status in the uterus which, if not adequately hindered, could result in low fertility. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Redox Balance in Animal Physiology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Oxidative Stress and Nutraceuticals in the Modulation of the Immune Function: Current Knowledge in Animals of Veterinary Interest
Antioxidants 2019, 8(1), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8010028 - 18 Jan 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
In the veterinary sector, many papers deal with the relationships between inflammation and oxidative stress. However, few studies investigate the mechanisms of action of oxidised molecules in the regulation of immune cells. Thus, authors often assume that these events, sometime leading to oxidative [...] Read more.
In the veterinary sector, many papers deal with the relationships between inflammation and oxidative stress. However, few studies investigate the mechanisms of action of oxidised molecules in the regulation of immune cells. Thus, authors often assume that these events, sometime leading to oxidative stress, are conserved among species. The aim of this review is to draw the state-of-the-art of the current knowledge about the role of oxidised molecules and dietary antioxidant compounds in the regulation of the immune cell functions and suggest some perspectives for future investigations in animals of veterinary interest. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Redox Balance in Animal Physiology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
Redox Biology in Transition Periods of Dairy Cattle: Role in the Health of Periparturient and Neonatal Animals
Antioxidants 2019, 8(1), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8010020 - 13 Jan 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
Dairy cows undergo various transition periods throughout their productive life, which are associated with periods of increased metabolic and infectious disease susceptibility. Redox balance plays a key role in ensuring a satisfactory transition. Nevertheless, oxidative stress (OS), a consequence of redox imbalance, has [...] Read more.
Dairy cows undergo various transition periods throughout their productive life, which are associated with periods of increased metabolic and infectious disease susceptibility. Redox balance plays a key role in ensuring a satisfactory transition. Nevertheless, oxidative stress (OS), a consequence of redox imbalance, has been associated with an increased risk of disease in these animals. In the productive cycle of dairy cows, the periparturient and neonatal periods are times of increased OS and disease susceptibility. This article reviews the relationship of redox status and OS with diseases of cows and calves, and how supplementation with antioxidants can be used to prevent OS in these animals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Redox Balance in Animal Physiology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
Mammary Stem Cells in Domestic Animals: The Role of ROS
Antioxidants 2019, 8(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8010006 - 26 Dec 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced as a natural byproduct of the normal metabolism of oxygen and play significant roles in cell signaling and homeostasis. Although ROS have been involved in pathological processes as diverse as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and aging, they may [...] Read more.
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced as a natural byproduct of the normal metabolism of oxygen and play significant roles in cell signaling and homeostasis. Although ROS have been involved in pathological processes as diverse as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and aging, they may to exert an effect even in a physiological context. In the central nervous system, stem cells and hematopoietic stem cells are early progenitors that contain lower levels of ROS than their more mature progeny. These different concentrations have been reported to be crucial for maintaining stem cell function. Mammary gland remodeling has been proposed to be organized through the activation and regulation of cells with stemness, either considered real stem cells or primitive precursors. Given the state of oxidative stress in the mammary gland tissue induced by high milk production, in particular in highly productive dairy cows; several studies have focused on the relationship between adult mammary stem cells and the oxidative state of the gland. The oxidative state of the mammary gland appears to be involved in the initial development and metastasis of breast cancer through interference with mammary cancerous stem cells. This review summarizes some links between the mammary stem and oxidative state of the gland. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Redox Balance in Animal Physiology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop