Topical Collection "Feature Paper in ROS, RNS, RSS"

A topical collection in Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This collection belongs to the section "ROS, RNS and RSS".

Editor

Prof. Dr. Claus Jacob
Website
Collection Editor
Division of Bioorganic Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Saarland University, D-66123 Saarbruecken, Germany
Interests: bioorganic chemistry; catalytic sensor/effector agents; epistemology; intracellular diagnostics; nanotechnology; natural products; reactive sulfur and selenium species; redox regulation via the cellular thiolstat
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

The last decade has witnessed a rising interest in the field of “reactive species”, i.e., small molecule compounds which react readily with biomolecules and hence result in wider biochemical responses, from the inhibition of proteins and enzymes to cellular sensing and signalling, responses and control. Among the most reactive species identified so far, reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and reactive sulfur species (RSS) take centre stage. Since ROS, RNS and RSS often interact with each other, they also impact cellular systems together, and it is worth considering these species together.

This Topical Collection will therefore address the latest developments in the field of reactive species, from their formation and physicochemical properties to their biological activity and analysis. A particular focus will reside on reactive species and health, an issue becoming increasingly important in modern societies affected by considerable demographic changes.

  • Topics covered in this collection include, among others:
  • Reactive oxygen species
  • Reactive nitrogen species
  • Reactive sulfur species
  • Formation of reactive species in biology
  • Detection and analysis of reactive species
  • Cellular redox signalling
  • Cell damage and repair
  • Environmental pollution and reactive species
  • Reactive species in ageing
  • Nutrition and antioxidants
  • Reactive species based on other elements
  • Cosmetics

Prof. Dr. Claus Jacob
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

2020

Open AccessArticle
Spontaneous Formation of Melanin from Dopamine in the Presence of Iron
Antioxidants 2020, 9(12), 1285; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9121285 - 16 Dec 2020
Abstract
Parkinson’s disease is associated with degeneration of neuromelanin (NM)-containing substantia nigra dopamine (DA) neurons and subsequent decreases in striatal DA transmission. Dopamine spontaneously forms a melanin through a process called melanogenesis. The present study examines conditions that promote/prevent DA melanogenesis. The kinetics, intermediates, [...] Read more.
Parkinson’s disease is associated with degeneration of neuromelanin (NM)-containing substantia nigra dopamine (DA) neurons and subsequent decreases in striatal DA transmission. Dopamine spontaneously forms a melanin through a process called melanogenesis. The present study examines conditions that promote/prevent DA melanogenesis. The kinetics, intermediates, and products of DA conversion to melanin in vitro, and DA melanogenesis under varying levels of Fe3+, pro-oxidants, and antioxidants were examined. The rate of melanogenesis for DA was substantially greater than related catecholamines norepinephrine and epinephrine and their precursor amino acids tyrosine and l-Dopa as measured by UV-IR spectrophotometry. Dopamine melanogenesis was concentration dependent on the pro-oxidant species and Fe3+. Melanogenesis was enhanced by the pro-oxidant hydrogen peroxide (EC50 = 500 μM) and decreased by the antioxidants ascorbate (IC50 = 10 μM) and glutathione (GSH; IC50 = 5 μM). Spectrophotometric results were corroborated by tuning a fast-scan cyclic voltammetry system to monitor DA melanogenesis. Evoked DA release in striatal brain slices resulted in NM formation that was prevented by GSH. These findings suggest that DA melanogenesis occurs spontaneously under physiologically-relevant conditions of oxidative stress and that NM may act as a marker of past exposure to oxidative stress. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Antioxidants as Molecular Probes: Structurally Novel Dihydro-m-Terphenyls as Turn-On Fluorescence Chemodosimeters for Biologically Relevant Oxidants
Antioxidants 2020, 9(7), 605; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9070605 - 10 Jul 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
One interesting aspect of antioxidant organic molecules is their use as probes for the detection and quantitation of biologically relevant reactive oxidant species (ROS). In this context, a small library of dihydroterphenyl derivatives has been synthesised and studied as fluorescent chemodosimeters for detecting [...] Read more.
One interesting aspect of antioxidant organic molecules is their use as probes for the detection and quantitation of biologically relevant reactive oxidant species (ROS). In this context, a small library of dihydroterphenyl derivatives has been synthesised and studied as fluorescent chemodosimeters for detecting reactive oxygen species and hypochlorite. The fluorescence quantum yields of these molecules are negligible, while the corresponding aromatized compounds formed upon oxidation show moderate to high native fluorescence, depending on their structures. The fluorescence signal is quickly developed in the presence of trace amounts of the probe and the analytes in acetonitrile media at room temperature, with good analytical figures. ROS detection in aqueous media required incubation at 37 °C in the presence of horseradish peroxidase, and was applied to glucose quantitation by coupling glucose oxidation by O2 to fluorescence detection of H2O2. The mild reaction conditions and sensitive fluorescent response lead us to propose dihydroterphenyls with an embedded anthranilate moiety as chemosensors/chemodosimeters for ROS detection. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Allies or Enemies: The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Developmental Processes of Black Cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa)
Antioxidants 2020, 9(3), 199; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9030199 - 27 Feb 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
In contrast to aboveground organs (stems and leaves), developmental events and their regulation in underground organs, such as pioneer and fine roots, are quite poorly understood. The objective of the current study was to achieve a better understanding of the physiological and molecular [...] Read more.
In contrast to aboveground organs (stems and leaves), developmental events and their regulation in underground organs, such as pioneer and fine roots, are quite poorly understood. The objective of the current study was to achieve a better understanding of the physiological and molecular role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS-related enzymes in the process of stem and pioneer root development in black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa), as well as in the senescence of leaves and fine roots. Results of a transcriptomic analysis revealed that primary/secondary growth and senescence are accompanied by substantial changes in the expression of genes related to oxidative stress metabolism. We observed that some mechanisms common for above- and under-ground organs, e.g., the expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) genes and SOD activity, declined during stems’ and pioneer roots’ development. Moreover, the localization of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2) in the primary and secondary xylem of stems and pioneer roots confirms their involvement in xylem cell wall lignification and the induction of programmed cell death (PCD). H2O2 and O2 in senescing fine roots were present in the same locations as demonstrated previously for ATG8 (AuTophaGy-related) proteins, implying their participation in cell degradation during senescence, while O2 in older leaves was also localized similarly to ATG8 in chloroplasts, suggesting their role in chlorophagy. ROS and ROS-related enzymes play an integral role in the lignification of xylem cell walls in Populus trichocarpa, as well as the induction of PCD during xylogenesis and senescence. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Reactive Sulfur Species Interact with Other Signal Molecules in Root Nodule Symbiosis in Lotus japonicus
Antioxidants 2020, 9(2), 145; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9020145 - 07 Feb 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Reactive sulfur species (RSS) function as strong antioxidants and are involved in various biological responses in animals and bacteria. Few studies; however, have examined RSS in plants. In the present study, we clarified that RSS are involved in root nodule symbiosis in the [...] Read more.
Reactive sulfur species (RSS) function as strong antioxidants and are involved in various biological responses in animals and bacteria. Few studies; however, have examined RSS in plants. In the present study, we clarified that RSS are involved in root nodule symbiosis in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Polysulfides, a type of RSS, were detected in the roots by using a sulfane sulfur-specific fluorescent probe, SSP4. Supplying the sulfane sulfur donor Na2S3 to the roots increased the amounts of both polysulfides and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the roots and simultaneously decreased the amounts of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). RSS were also detected in infection threads in the root hairs and in infected cells of nodules. Supplying the sulfane sulfur donor significantly increased the numbers of infection threads and nodules. When nodules were immersed in the sulfane sulfur donor, their nitrogenase activity was significantly reduced, without significant changes in the amounts of NO, ROS, and H2S. These results suggest that polysulfides interact with signal molecules such as NO, ROS, and H2S in root nodule symbiosis in L. japonicus. SSP4 and Na2S3 are useful tools for study of RSS in plants. Full article
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