Special Issue "Feature Papers 2021 Editors Collection"

A special issue of Sci (ISSN 2413-4155).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Claus Jacob
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of Bioorganic Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Saarland University, D-66123 Saarbruecken, Germany
Interests: bioorganic chemistry; catalytic sensor/effector agents; epistemology; intracellular diagnostics; nanotechnology; natural products; reactive sulfur and selenium species; redox regulation via the cellular thiolstat
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Mr. Ahmad Yaman Abdin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor Assistant
Division of Bioorganic Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Saarland University, D-66123 Saarbruecken, Germany
Interests: philosophy of science; history of science; scientific communication; philosophy of chemistry; pharmacy; history of pharmacy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce our second Special Issue of the annual series of Feature Papers Editors Collection. We intend to focus this year on interdisciplinarity. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has illustrated gaps between different scientific disciplines and scientific practices. One way of bridging such gaps is by collaborating across disciplines to tackle the main challenges facing us today, such as energy, food, water, climate, and health. Therefore, in 2021, our Special Issue aims to publish original articles and reviews on the interdisciplinary topics considered by our editors as being actual and highly significant. We, therefore, invite you as an authority in your field of research to contribute a keynote publication aimed at scientific interdisciplinary problem solving. These “Feature Papers” will be collected as part of the annual overview of activities in the areas relevant to Sci and will be published in book format after the Special Issue has been closed.

As always, we welcome high quality contributions falling within the scope of our journal and its various fields of scientific activity. Submitted manuscripts in these areas will gain immediate visibility on Preprints, receive the possibility of undergoing public peer review and will feature prominently on the Sci website.

Prof. Dr. Claus Jacob
Mr. Ahmad Yaman Abdin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sci is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Cycling Time Trial Performance and Prefrontal Cortex Activation
Sci 2021, 3(3), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/sci3030032 - 24 Jul 2021
Viewed by 251
Abstract
Background: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a neuromodulatory technique that delivers low levels of a constant current via scalp electrodes to specifically targeted areas of the brain. The effects of tDCS on whole-body exercise performance has been of interest in recent literature. [...] Read more.
Background: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a neuromodulatory technique that delivers low levels of a constant current via scalp electrodes to specifically targeted areas of the brain. The effects of tDCS on whole-body exercise performance has been of interest in recent literature. The purpose of the current investigation was to investigate if tDCS, administered via Halo Sport, influences time trial performance in trained cyclists, and if changes in exercise performance are associated with prefrontal cortex (PFC) activation and/or muscle oxygenation (SmO2). Methods: Twelve recreationally trained cyclists volunteered to participate in a crossover study design involving two 10-kilometer time trials following 20 min of tDCS or a sham condition. Results: t-tests showed there was no significant difference in performance (time to completion) or physiological measures (blood lactate (BL) concentration, heart rate (HR), SmO2, PFC oxygenation) between the Halo and sham conditions. Conclusions: These results indicate that the application of tDCS via Halo Sport does not induce changes in exercise performance or related physiological parameters during a 10-kilometer cycling time trial. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers 2021 Editors Collection)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Inhibition of quorum sensing by conventional antibiotics and resistance modifiers
Authors: Annamária Kincses, Bo Young Huh, Nikoletta Szemerédi, Bálint Rácz, Gabriella Spengler
Affiliation: Department of Medical Microbiology, Albert Szent-Györgyi Health Center and Faculty of Medicine, University of Szeged, Semmelweis utca 6, 6725 Szeged, Hungary
Abstract: Multidrug resistant organisms (MDROs) are one of the most severe inevitable issues which hinder the effective treatment of disease and administration of various anti-microbial agents. Quorum sensing (QS) is the regulation of gene expression depending on cell-population density. Bacteria produce and release chemical signal molecules called autoinducers that increase in concentration as a function of cell density. Drug repurposing (or drug repositioning) is an approach to identify new applications for approved drugs that are outside the scope of the original medical indication. In our study, the antibacterial, anti-QS and biofilm inhibiting properties of well know antibiotics, efflux pump inhibitors, proton pump inhibitors, and antipsychotic drugs were determined in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The antibacterial activity of the compounds was assessed by broth microdilution method. The anti-biofilm activity of compounds was determined on Gram-negative, biofilm-producing Salmonella Typhimurium 14028s, E. coli ATCC 25922 strains and on Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and methicillin resistant S. aureus 272123 strains using crystal violet (CV) staining. The inhibition of quorum sensing (QS) was determined using the sensor strain Chromobacterium violaceum 026 and the AHL producer strain Enterobacter cloacae 31298 by agar diffusion method. It can be concluded that five compounds including gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, thioridazine (TZ), phenyl-arginine-β-naphthylamide (PAβN), and chlorpromazine (CPZ) demonstrated highly efficient QS inhibitory effect. Gentamicin had a biofilm inhibiting activity on E. coli and S. Typhimurium, ciprofloxacin inhibited the biofilm formation by S. Typhimurium. The antipsychotic drug thioridazine inhibited the biofilm produced by the reference S. aureus strain. Furthermore, PAβN demonstrated anti-biofilm activity on Gram-negatives such as E. coli and S. Typhimurium. Furthermore, CPZ could inhibit the biofilm formation of S. Typhimurium and S. aureus. In the future these compounds might be used as anti-biofilm agents, however various aspects of the mode of action of these compounds are not clearly understood yet. Agents with anti-virulence properties may represent new potential antibacterial therapeutics in the future. QS-based modulation of bacterial virulence could be an attractive strategy because the pharmacokinetic parameters and tolerability of most of these compounds have already been investigated.

Title: A practical approach for quantitative polymerase chain reaction, the gold standard in microbiological diagnosis
Authors: Tímea Mosolygó 1,2, Krisztián Laczi 3, Gabriella Spengler 1,2, and Katalin Burián 1,2
Affiliation: 1 Department of Medical Microbiology, Albert Szent-Györgyi Health Center and Faculty of Medicine, University of Szeged, Hungary 2 MTA-SZTE Microbiology and Health Education Research Group, Hungary 3 Department of Biotechnology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary
Abstract: From gene expression studies to identifying microbes quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is widely used in research and medical diagnostics. In transmittable diseases like the Ebola outbreak in West Africa (2014-2016), or the present SARS-CoV2 pandemic qPCR plays a key role in the detection of infected patients. Although the technique itself is decades old with reliable approaches (eg. TaqMan essay) in the diagnosis of pathogens many people showed distrust in it during the SARS-CoV2 outbreak. This came mainly from not understanding or misunderstanding the principles of qPCR. This situation motivated us to design a simple laboratory practical class, in which students have opportunities to understand the underlying principles of qPCR and its advantages in microbiological diagnosis. Moreover, during the exercise, they can develop skills such as handling experimental assays, and the ability to solve problems, discuss their observations. Finally, this activity brings them closer to the clinical practice and they can see the impact of the science on real life. The class is addressed to undergraduate students of biological sciences.

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