Hypoxia and Oxidative Stress

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "ROS, RNS and RSS".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2022) | Viewed by 10397

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Experimental and Molecular Pediatric Cardiologie, German Heart Center Munich, 80636 Munich, Germany
Interests: hypoxia; redox signaling; oxidative stress; NADPH oxidases

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Experimental and Molecular Pediatric Cardiology, German Heart Center Munich at the Technical University Munich, Munich, Germany
Interests: hypoxia; reactive oxygen species; oxidative stress; organism; cardiovascular, inflammatory and tumor diseases

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Hypoxia and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) share a toxic dependency on each other. Both can be considered as types of redox stress—hypoxia is a result of lack of oxygen, whereas increased levels of ROS can result from increased levels of oxygen. Additionally, in cases of reoxygenation, hypoxia leads to an increase of ROS generation. There are various sources of ROS, of which there are three main types. One main source is the respiratory chain of the mitochondria, which produces increased numbers of ROS, especially in the presence of an excess of oxygen or after reoxygenation. Another source is the uncoupled NO synthase resulting from a lack of amino acids, which can be a result of hypoxia. The third source is the family of NADPH oxidases, enzymes whose only function is to generate ROS, such as superoxides and hydrogen peroxide. Several components of the NADPH oxidases are activated by the family of HIF transcription factors. However, the HIF transcription factors are also redox-sensitive themselves and can be activated by non-hypoxic redox processes. Despite considerable progress in understanding this relationship between hypoxia and ROS, the big picture regarding different physiological or pathophysiological conditions is only partly understood.

With this Special Issue, we want to shed light on this field. Therefore, we kindly invite you to submit your latest research findings or reviews covering two aspects in particular—new knowledge of the mechanisms and pathways involved in the generation and actions of ROS under or after hypoxia and under physiological and pathophysiological conditions, and new knowledge of regulations of mediators of hypoxic pathways in which ROS are involved. Additionally, papers describing new methods that can be used to detect and distinguish different types of ROS under hypoxic conditions are welcomed. We believe this Special Issue will offer a snapshot of the current knowledge of the interplay between ROS and hypoxia, which will not only include important current advances, but will also be a worthwhile resource for researchers worldwide wanting to deepen their knowledge in this field.

We look forward to your contributions and will be happy to discuss your suggestions.

Dr. Andreas Petry
Prof. Dr. Agnes Görlach
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • hypoxia
  • reoxygenation
  • oxidative stress
  • respiratory chain
  • uncoupled NO synthase
  • NADPH oxidases

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

22 pages, 4174 KiB  
Article
Tandem Mass Tagging-Based Quantitative Proteomics Analysis Reveals Damage to the Liver and Brain of Hypophthalmichthys molitrix Exposed to Acute Hypoxia and Reoxygenation
by Xiaohui Li, Cui Feng, Hang Sha, Tong Zhou, Guiwei Zou and Hongwei Liang
Antioxidants 2022, 11(3), 589; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11030589 - 19 Mar 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2525
Abstract
Aquaculture environments frequently experience hypoxia and subsequent reoxygenation conditions, which have significant effects on hypoxia-sensitive fish populations. In this study, hepatic biochemical activity indices in serum and the content of major neurotransmitters in the brain were altered markedly after acute hypoxia and reoxygenation [...] Read more.
Aquaculture environments frequently experience hypoxia and subsequent reoxygenation conditions, which have significant effects on hypoxia-sensitive fish populations. In this study, hepatic biochemical activity indices in serum and the content of major neurotransmitters in the brain were altered markedly after acute hypoxia and reoxygenation exposure in silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix). Proteomics analysis of the liver showed that a number of immune-related and cytoskeletal organization-related proteins were downregulated, the ferroptosis pathway was activated, and several antioxidant molecules and detoxifying enzymes were upregulated. Proteomics analysis of the brain showed that somatostatin-1A (SST1A) was upregulated, dopamine-degrading enzyme catechol O methyltransferase (COMT) and ferritin, heavy subunit (FerH) were downregulated, and the levels of proteins involved in the nervous system were changed in different ways. In conclusion, these findings highlight that hypoxia–reoxygenation has potential adverse effects on growth, locomotion, immunity, and reproduction of silver carp, and represents a serious threat to liver and brain function, possibly via ferroptosis, oxidative stress, and cytoskeleton destruction in the liver, and abnormal expression of susceptibility genes for neurodegenerative disorders in the brain. Our present findings provide clues to the mechanisms of hypoxia and reoxygenation damage in the brain and liver of hypoxia-sensitive fish. They could also be used to develop methods to reduce hypoxia or reoxygenation injury to fish. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hypoxia and Oxidative Stress)
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17 pages, 31698 KiB  
Article
Integrated Metabolomics and Transcriptomic Analysis of Hepatopancreas in Different Living Status Macrobrachium nipponense in Response to Hypoxia
by Lei Xu, Wenyi Zhang, Hui Qiao, Sufei Jiang, Yiwei Xiong, Shubo Jin, Yongsheng Gong and Hongtuo Fu
Antioxidants 2022, 11(1), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11010036 - 24 Dec 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2582
Abstract
As the basic element of aerobic animal life, oxygen participates in most physiological activities of animals. Hypoxia stress is often the subject of aquatic animal research. Macrobrachium nipponense, an economically important aquatic animal in southern China, has been affected by hypoxia for [...] Read more.
As the basic element of aerobic animal life, oxygen participates in most physiological activities of animals. Hypoxia stress is often the subject of aquatic animal research. Macrobrachium nipponense, an economically important aquatic animal in southern China, has been affected by hypoxia for many years and this has resulted in a large amount of economic loss due to its sensitivity to hypoxia; Metabolism and transcriptome data were combined in the analysis of the hepatopancreas of M. nipponense in different physiological states under hypoxia; A total of 108, 86, and 48 differentially expressed metabolites (DEMs) were found in three different comparisons (survived, moribund, and dead shrimps), respectively. Thirty-two common DEMs were found by comparing the different physiological states of M. nipponense with the control group in response to hypoxia. Twelve hypoxia-related genes were identified by screening and analyzing common DEMs. GTP phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) was the only differentially expressed gene that ranked highly in transcriptome analysis combined with metabolome analysis. PEPCK ranked highly both in transcriptome analysis and in combination with metabolism analysis; therefore, it was considered to have an important role in hypoxic response. This manuscript fills the one-sidedness of the gap in hypoxia transcriptome analysis and reversely deduces several new genes related to hypoxia from metabolites. This study contributes to the clarification of the molecular process associated with M. nipponense under hypoxic stress. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hypoxia and Oxidative Stress)
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22 pages, 5612 KiB  
Article
Stemness of Human Pluripotent Cells: Hypoxia-Like Response Induced by Low Nitric Oxide
by Estefanía Caballano-Infantes, Irene Díaz, Ana Belén Hitos, Gladys Margot Cahuana, Antonio Martínez-Ruiz, Bárbara Soria-Juan, Rosario Rodríguez-Griñolo, Abdelkrim Hmadcha, Franz Martín, Bernat Soria, Juan R. Tejedo and Francisco Javier Bedoya
Antioxidants 2021, 10(9), 1408; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox10091408 - 02 Sep 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3386
Abstract
The optimization of conditions to promote the stemness of pluripotent cells in vitro is instrumental for their use in advanced therapies. We show here that exposure of human iPSCs and human ESCs to low concentrations of the chemical NO donor DETA/NO leads to [...] Read more.
The optimization of conditions to promote the stemness of pluripotent cells in vitro is instrumental for their use in advanced therapies. We show here that exposure of human iPSCs and human ESCs to low concentrations of the chemical NO donor DETA/NO leads to stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF-1α and HIF-2α) under normoxia, with this effect being dependent on diminished Pro 402 hydroxylation and decreased degradation by the proteasome. Moreover, the master genes of pluripotency, NANOG and OCT-4, were upregulated. NO also induces a shift in the metabolic profile of PSCs, with an increased expression of hypoxia response genes in glycolysis. Furthermore, a reduction in the mitochondrial membrane potential with lower oxygen consumption and increased expression of mitochondrial fusion regulators, such as DRP1, was observed. The results reported here indicate that NO mimics hypoxia response in human PSCs and enhances their stemness properties when cultured under normoxic conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hypoxia and Oxidative Stress)
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