Special Issue "Crop Responses and Tolerance to Abiotic Stress"

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Crop Production".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 June 2023 | Viewed by 1692

Special Issue Editors

Institute of Materials for Electronics and Magnetism, National Research Council (IMEM-CNR), Parco Area Delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma, Italy
Interests: precision agriculture; drought stress; phenotyping; sensors; abiotic stresses; wheat; tomato; transpiration; plant growth
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Biosciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Giovanni Celoria 26, 20133 Milano, Italy
Interests: plant physiology; organellar calcium signaling; calcium imaging; signal transduction; molecular biology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the summer, the climate crisis dominated the headlines, with food security severely hampered by the increasing world population and the occurrence of severe environmental condition changes and meteorological events.

Abiotic stresses can impact crop yields terribly; thus, understanding the molecular and physiological bases of the tolerance mechanisms triggered during abiotic stresses, together with a deep characterization of contrasting phenotypes, are key aspects for addressing the needs of more tolerant crops. Droughts, heat, cold, salinity, heavy metal pollution, mineral deficiency and ultraviolet radiation limit plant growth and development, leading to yield reductions worldwide.

This Special Issue aims to collect reviews and original paper covering advances in understanding the tolerance to abiotic stresses and focusing on stress mitigation strategies, including novel approaches spanning the characterization of novel genetic materials, the exploitation of genetic resources and the use of novel agrochemical inputs to promote the plant defense response to abiotic stresses.

Dr. Michela Janni
Dr. Francesca Resentini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • abiotic stress
  • plant phenotyping
  • genetic material
  • genetic resources
  • defense response mechanisms
  • sensing technology
  • omics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Combined Effects of Drought and Soil Fertility on the Synthesis of Vitamins in Green Leafy Vegetables
Agriculture 2023, 13(5), 984; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture13050984 - 29 Apr 2023
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Abstract
Green leafy vegetables, such as Vigna unguiculata, Brassica oleraceae, and Solanum scabrum, are important sources of vitamins A, B1, and C. Although vitamin deficiencies considerably affect human health, not much is known about the effects of changing soil and climate [...] Read more.
Green leafy vegetables, such as Vigna unguiculata, Brassica oleraceae, and Solanum scabrum, are important sources of vitamins A, B1, and C. Although vitamin deficiencies considerably affect human health, not much is known about the effects of changing soil and climate conditions on vegetable vitamin concentrations. The effects of high or low soil fertility and three drought intensities (75%, 50%, and 25% pot capacity) on three plant species were analysed (n = 48 pots) in a greenhouse trial. The fresh yield was reduced in all the vegetables as a result of lower soil fertility during a severe drought. The vitamin concentrations increased with increasing drought stress in some species. Regardless, the total vitamin yields showed a net decrease due to the significant biomass loss. Changes in vitamin concentrations as a result of a degrading environment and increasing climate change events are an important factor to be considered for food composition calculations and nutrient balances, particularly due to the consequences on human health, and should therefore be considered in agricultural trials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Crop Responses and Tolerance to Abiotic Stress)
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Article
The Promotive Effect of Putrescine on Growth, Biochemical Constituents, and Yield of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Plants under Water Stress
Agriculture 2023, 13(3), 587; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture13030587 - 28 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 901
Abstract
Drought stress is a significant environmental variable affecting wheat growth and development. Plant stress tolerance is intimately related to growth regulators of plants as polyamines. The study assessed the impact of drought (50% water irrigation and 100% water irrigation), priming of grains in [...] Read more.
Drought stress is a significant environmental variable affecting wheat growth and development. Plant stress tolerance is intimately related to growth regulators of plants as polyamines. The study assessed the impact of drought (50% water irrigation and 100% water irrigation), priming of grains in putrescine (0.25, 0.5, and 1 mM), and their interactions on the growth, yield, and physiological attributes of wheat plants. Drought conditions declined plant height, fresh and dry weights, leaves and tillers numbers, and flag leaf area. However, applying putrescine, especially at (1 mM), enhanced wheat growth performance in normal or water-deficit conditions. Drought stress decreased spike length (28.6%), number of spikelets (15.6%), number of grains (30.3%), the weight of the spike (23.5%), and the weight of the grains/spike (37.5%). In addition, drought decreased the contents of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, free amino acids, and total phenols, while applying putrescine enhanced wheat plant growth performance in normal or drought conditions. Putrescine at (1 mM) achieved the highest increase in plant height (38.8%), root length (50%), leaves number (166%), tillers number (80%), flag leaf area (70.3%), shoot fresh weight (99.4%), shoot dry weight (98.4%), root fresh weight (97.8%), root dry weight (210%) compared to the untreated plants. Moreover, pretreatment with putrescine improved chlorophyll a (13.3%), chlorophyll b (70.3%), carotenoids (61.8%), soluble sugars (49.1%), amino acids (42.7%), phenols (52.4%), number of spikelets (59.3%), number of grains (81.1%), and weight of spike (45.4%). Moreover, variations in the protein profile of wheat plants were due to drought conditions and putrescine application. In conclusion, priming wheat grains with putrescine effectively induces protective mechanisms against water stress and improves wheat plants’ physiological attributes and yield components. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Crop Responses and Tolerance to Abiotic Stress)
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