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Colloids Interfaces, Volume 2, Issue 3 (September 2018)

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Open AccessArticle Metal Ion Interactions with Crude Oil Components: Specificity of Ca2+ Binding to Naphthenic Acid at an Oil/Water Interface
Colloids Interfaces 2018, 2(3), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/colloids2030040
Received: 17 August 2018 / Revised: 13 September 2018 / Accepted: 14 September 2018 / Published: 18 September 2018
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Abstract
On the basis of dynamic interfacial tension measurements, Ca2+ has been shown specifically to interact with naphthenic acid (NA) at the n-heptane/water interface, consistent with NA adsorption followed by interfacial complexation and formation of a more ordered interfacial film. Optimum concentrations of
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On the basis of dynamic interfacial tension measurements, Ca2+ has been shown specifically to interact with naphthenic acid (NA) at the n-heptane/water interface, consistent with NA adsorption followed by interfacial complexation and formation of a more ordered interfacial film. Optimum concentrations of Ca2+ and NA have been found to yield lower, time-dependent interfacial tensions, not evident for Mg2+ and Sr2+ or for several alkali metal ions studied. The results reflect the specific hydration and coordination chemistry of Ca2+ seen in biology. Owing to the ubiquitous presence of Ca2+ in oilfield waters, this finding has potential relevance to the surface chemistry underlying crude oil recovery. For example, “locking” acidic components at water/oil interfaces may be important for crude oil emulsion stability, or in bonding bulk oil to mineral surfaces through an aqueous phase, potentially relevant for carbonate reservoirs. The relevance of the present results to low salinity waterflooding as an enhanced crude oil recovery technique is also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Colloids and Interfaces in Oil Recovery)
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Open AccessReview Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Protein Biosurfactants
Colloids Interfaces 2018, 2(3), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/colloids2030039
Received: 19 August 2018 / Revised: 4 September 2018 / Accepted: 6 September 2018 / Published: 8 September 2018
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Abstract
Surfaces and interfaces are ubiquitous in nature and are involved in many biological processes. Due to this, natural organisms have evolved a number of methods to control interfacial and surface properties. Many of these methods involve the use of specialised protein biosurfactants, which
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Surfaces and interfaces are ubiquitous in nature and are involved in many biological processes. Due to this, natural organisms have evolved a number of methods to control interfacial and surface properties. Many of these methods involve the use of specialised protein biosurfactants, which due to the competing demands of high surface activity, biocompatibility, and low solution aggregation may take structures that differ from the traditional head–tail structure of small molecule surfactants. As well as their biological functions, these proteins have also attracted interest for industrial applications, in areas including food technology, surface modification, and drug delivery. To understand the biological functions and technological applications of protein biosurfactants, it is necessary to have a molecular level description of their behaviour, in particular at surfaces and interfaces, for which molecular simulation is well suited to investigate. In this review, we will give an overview of simulation studies of a number of examples of protein biosurfactants (hydrophobins, surfactin, and ranaspumin). We will also outline some of the key challenges and future directions for molecular simulation in the investigation of protein biosurfactants and how this can help guide future developments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosurfactants: Trends and Applications)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Static and Dynamic Performance of Wet Foam and Polymer-Enhanced Foam in the Presence of Heavy Oil
Colloids Interfaces 2018, 2(3), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/colloids2030038
Received: 20 July 2018 / Revised: 20 August 2018 / Accepted: 28 August 2018 / Published: 8 September 2018
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Abstract
Inadequate sweep efficiency is one of the main concerns in conventional heavy oil recovery processes. Alternative processes are therefore needed to increase heavy oil sweep efficiency. Foam injection has gained interest in conventional oil recovery in recent times as it can control the
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Inadequate sweep efficiency is one of the main concerns in conventional heavy oil recovery processes. Alternative processes are therefore needed to increase heavy oil sweep efficiency. Foam injection has gained interest in conventional oil recovery in recent times as it can control the mobility ratio and improve the sweep efficiency over chemical or gas flooding. However, most of the studies have focused on light crude oil. This study aims to investigate the static and dynamic performances of foam and polymer-enhanced foam (PEF) in the presence of heavy oil. Static and dynamic experiments were conducted to investigate the potential of foam and PEF for heavy oil recovery. Static analysis included foam/PEF stability, decay profile, and image analysis. A linear visual sand pack was used to visualize the performance of CO2 foam and CO2 PEF in porous media (dynamic experiments). Nonionic, anionic, and cationic surfactants were used as the foaming agents. Static stability results showed that the anionic surfactant generated relatively more stable foam, even in the presence of heavy oil. Slower liquid drainage and collapse rates for PEF compared to that of foam were the key observations through foam static analyses. Besides improving heavy oil recovery, the addition of polymer accelerated foam generation and propagation in porous media saturated with heavy oil. Visual analysis demonstrated more stable frontal displacement and higher sweep efficiency of PEF compared to conventional foam flooding. Unlike foam injection, lesser channeling (foam collapse) was observed during PEF injection. The results of this study will open a new insight on the potential of foam, especially polymer-enhanced foam, for oil recovery of those reservoirs with viscous oil. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Colloids and Interfaces in Oil Recovery)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle H2O/D2O Contrast Variation for Ultra-Small-Angle Neutron Scattering to Minimize Multiple Scattering Effects of Colloidal Particle Suspensions
Colloids Interfaces 2018, 2(3), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/colloids2030037
Received: 20 August 2018 / Revised: 4 September 2018 / Accepted: 5 September 2018 / Published: 7 September 2018
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Abstract
This study investigated the use of solvent contrast (H2O/D2O ratio) as a means to optimize the ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) signal. By optimizing the signal, it was possible to reduce the undesirable effects of coherent multiple scattering while still
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This study investigated the use of solvent contrast (H2O/D2O ratio) as a means to optimize the ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) signal. By optimizing the signal, it was possible to reduce the undesirable effects of coherent multiple scattering while still maintaining a measurable scattered intensity. This result will further enable the use of USANS as a probe of the interactions between colloidal particles and their structures within concentrated suspensions as well as particle dispersion/aggregation. As a model system, we prepared silica colloidal particle suspensions at different solid concentrations. USANS curves were measured using the classical Bonse–Hart double crystal diffractometer while varying the scattering length density of the aqueous phase, thus varying the contrast to the silica particles. As a means of assessing the impact of multiple scattering effects on different q-values, we analyzed the scattered intensity at different contrasts at three different q values. The data were then used to determine the match point of the silica particle suspensions from the expected square root dependence of the scattered intensity with solvent composition, to analyze any differences associated with the solid concentration change, and to determine the optimum H2O/D2O ratio in terms of high transmission (TSAS > 80%) and high enough scattering intensity associated with the contrast of the system. Through this investigation series, we confirmed that adjusting the contrast of the solvent (H2O/D2O) is a good methodology to reduce multiple scattering while maintaining a strong enough scattering signal from a concentrated suspension of silica particles for both USANS and rheometric USANS (rheo-USANS) experiments. Full article
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Open AccessReview Statistical Design, a Powerful Tool for Optimizing Biosurfactant Production: A Review
Colloids Interfaces 2018, 2(3), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/colloids2030036
Received: 24 July 2018 / Revised: 11 August 2018 / Accepted: 27 August 2018 / Published: 2 September 2018
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Abstract
Biosurfactants (Bs) have been studied for decades and applied in different industrial sectors because of their competitive biochemical characteristics, and the fact that they are environmentally friendly. Current scientific investigations mainly involve the search for novel Bs producing organisms with attractive characteristics. Bs
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Biosurfactants (Bs) have been studied for decades and applied in different industrial sectors because of their competitive biochemical characteristics, and the fact that they are environmentally friendly. Current scientific investigations mainly involve the search for novel Bs producing organisms with attractive characteristics. Bs are expected to replace synthetic surfactants in the near future, but low production yields and inefficient downstream processes have prevented their widespread use. Although there are numerous reports on Bs optimization, to date there has been no critical compilation or revision of the statistical designs and strategies employed for improved production. The purpose of this mini review is to briefly discuss the factors that affect Bs production and the importance of statistical design as an essential tool for increasing production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosurfactants: Trends and Applications)
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview The Impact of Biosurfactants on Microbial Cell Properties Leading to Hydrocarbon Bioavailability Increase
Colloids Interfaces 2018, 2(3), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/colloids2030035
Received: 1 August 2018 / Revised: 20 August 2018 / Accepted: 23 August 2018 / Published: 26 August 2018
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Abstract
The environment pollution with hydrophobic hydrocarbons is a serious problem that requires development of efficient strategies that would lead to bioremediation of contaminated areas. One of the common methods used for enhancement of biodegradation of pollutants is the addition of biosurfactants. Several mechanisms
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The environment pollution with hydrophobic hydrocarbons is a serious problem that requires development of efficient strategies that would lead to bioremediation of contaminated areas. One of the common methods used for enhancement of biodegradation of pollutants is the addition of biosurfactants. Several mechanisms have been postulated as responsible for hydrocarbons bioavailability enhancement with biosurfactants. They include solubilization and desorption of pollutants as well as modification of bacteria cell surface properties. The presented review contains a wide discussion of these mechanisms in the context of alteration of bioremediation efficiency with biosurfactants. It brings new light to such a complex and important issue. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosurfactants: Trends and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Micellar Parameters of Aqueous Solutions of Tween 20 and 60 at Different Temperatures: Volumetric and Viscometric Study
Colloids Interfaces 2018, 2(3), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/colloids2030034
Received: 4 July 2018 / Revised: 9 August 2018 / Accepted: 21 August 2018 / Published: 22 August 2018
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Abstract
Density, viscosity and speed of sound of aqueous solutions of nonionic surfactants such as polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monolaurate (Tween 20) and polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monostearate (Tween 60) at T = 293, 303 and 313 K are reported. From these measured values different parameters
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Density, viscosity and speed of sound of aqueous solutions of nonionic surfactants such as polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monolaurate (Tween 20) and polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monostearate (Tween 60) at T = 293, 303 and 313 K are reported. From these measured values different parameters such as, for example, isentropic compressibility, molecular free length, acoustic impedance, primary hydration numbers and internal pressure have been calculated and employed to discuss molecular packing, structural alteration and molecular interactions. The variation in these parameters with temperature indicates that the mobility of surfactant molecules increases the disordered state of the liquid (surfactant + water) due to irregular packing of the molecules. Also, for Tween 20 solutions, more conversion to bulk water of the structured water molecules was observed, obtaining lower compressibilities and higher values of hydration numbers as well as internal pressure for a given T. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Cholate Adsorption Behavior at Carbon Electrode Interface and Its Promotional Effect in Laccase Direct Bioelectrocatalysis
Colloids Interfaces 2018, 2(3), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/colloids2030033
Received: 11 July 2018 / Revised: 4 August 2018 / Accepted: 12 August 2018 / Published: 21 August 2018
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Abstract
Fast electron transfer between laccase (Lac) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can be achieved at a cholate-modified SWCNT interface. Furthermore, the catalytic reduction of O2 starts at a high potential, close to the equilibrium redox potential of the O2/H2
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Fast electron transfer between laccase (Lac) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can be achieved at a cholate-modified SWCNT interface. Furthermore, the catalytic reduction of O2 starts at a high potential, close to the equilibrium redox potential of the O2/H2O couple. A sodium cholate (SC)-modified electrode interface provides suitable conditions for Lac direct bioelectrocatalysis. In the present study, the SC promotional effect in Lac direct bioelectrocatalysis was investigated using various types of electrode materials. The fully hydrophilic surface of indium tin oxide and an Au electrode surface did not show a SC promotional effect, because SC did not bind to these surfaces. A carbon surface with a large number of defects was unsuitable for SC binding because of hydrophilic functional groups at the defect sites. Carbon surfaces with few defects, for example, basal-plane highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), gave a SC promotional effect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosurfactants: Trends and Applications)
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Open AccessReview Effect of Ionic Compounds of Different Valences on the Stability of Titanium Oxide Colloids
Colloids Interfaces 2018, 2(3), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/colloids2030032
Received: 12 July 2018 / Revised: 9 August 2018 / Accepted: 12 August 2018 / Published: 15 August 2018
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Abstract
Titanium oxide particles of various morphologies have been prepared for applications of scientific or industrial interest in recent decades. Besides development of novel synthetic routes and solid-state characterization of the obtained particles, colloidal stability of titanium oxide dispersions was the focus of numerous
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Titanium oxide particles of various morphologies have been prepared for applications of scientific or industrial interest in recent decades. Besides development of novel synthetic routes and solid-state characterization of the obtained particles, colloidal stability of titanium oxide dispersions was the focus of numerous research groups due to the high importance of this topic in applications in heterogeneous systems. The influence of dissolved ionic compounds, including monovalent salts, multivalent ions and polyelectrolytes, on the charging and aggregation behaviour of titanium oxide materials of spherical and elongated structures will be discussed in the present review. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Measurements of Dynamic Contributions to Coherent Neutron Scattering
Colloids Interfaces 2018, 2(3), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/colloids2030031
Received: 13 July 2018 / Revised: 3 August 2018 / Accepted: 3 August 2018 / Published: 7 August 2018
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Abstract
In this manuscript, we are investigating the contribution of dynamic membrane properties of phospholipid membranes to coherent scattering signals under grazing incidence. Spectroscopic measurements under grazing incidence can provide useful insight into the properties of biological membranes; however, they are often impeded by
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In this manuscript, we are investigating the contribution of dynamic membrane properties of phospholipid membranes to coherent scattering signals under grazing incidence. Spectroscopic measurements under grazing incidence can provide useful insight into the properties of biological membranes; however, they are often impeded by weak signals. By using grazing-incidence small-angle neutron scattering (GISANS) to identify a dynamic scattering contribution, we are able to independently corroborate the existence of a previously found dynamic mode, now measured by grazing-incidence neutron spin echo spectroscopy (GINSES). Additionally, by increasing the speed of measurement compared to GINSES from several days to hours, we were able to explore the temperature behavior of this mode in phospholipid membranes. These dynamic modes of the membranes show a wavelength of around 700 Å in-plane of the membrane and are most pronounced around 37 C and strongly decrease at lower temperatures below 25 C before vanishing at 20 C. We therefore speculate that they may be linked to biologically relevant functions of the membranes themselves. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an investigation of that membrane mode by means of GISANS. Full article
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Open AccessReview Interfacial and Colloidal Forces Governing Oil Droplet Displacement: Implications for Enhanced Oil Recovery
Colloids Interfaces 2018, 2(3), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/colloids2030030
Received: 29 May 2018 / Revised: 14 July 2018 / Accepted: 16 July 2018 / Published: 18 July 2018
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Abstract
Growing oil demand and the gradual depletion of conventional oil reserves by primary extraction has highlighted the need for enhanced oil recovery techniques to increase the potential of existing reservoirs and facilitate the recovery of more complex unconventional oils. This paper describes the
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Growing oil demand and the gradual depletion of conventional oil reserves by primary extraction has highlighted the need for enhanced oil recovery techniques to increase the potential of existing reservoirs and facilitate the recovery of more complex unconventional oils. This paper describes the interfacial and colloidal forces governing oil film displacement from solid surfaces. Direct contact of oil with the reservoir rock transforms the solid surface from a water-wet to neutrally-wet and oil-wet as a result of the deposition of polar components of the crude oil, with lower oil recovery from oil-wet reservoirs. To enhance oil recovery, chemicals can be added to the injection water to modify the oil-water interfacial tension and solid-oil-water three-phase contact angle. In the presence of certain surfactants and nanoparticles, a ruptured oil film will dewet to a new equilibrium contact angle, reducing the work of adhesion to detach an oil droplet from the solid surface. Dynamics of contact-line displacement are considered and the effect of surface active agents on enhancing oil displacement discussed. The paper is intended to provide an overview of the interfacial and colloidal forces controlling the process of oil film displacement and droplet detachment for enhanced oil recovery. A comprehensive summary of chemicals tested is provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Colloids and Interfaces in Oil Recovery)
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Open AccessArticle Hydrophobic Forces Are Relevant to Bacteria-Nanoparticle Interactions: Pseudomonas putida Capture Efficiency by Using Arginine, Cysteine or Oxalate Wrapped Magnetic Nanoparticles
Colloids Interfaces 2018, 2(3), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/colloids2030029
Received: 23 May 2018 / Revised: 9 July 2018 / Accepted: 15 July 2018 / Published: 18 July 2018
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Abstract
Size, shape and surface characteristics strongly affect interfacial interactions, as the presented among iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) aqueous colloids and bacteria. In other to find the forces among this interaction, we compare three types of surface modified NPs (exposing oxalate, arginine or cysteine
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Size, shape and surface characteristics strongly affect interfacial interactions, as the presented among iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) aqueous colloids and bacteria. In other to find the forces among this interaction, we compare three types of surface modified NPs (exposing oxalate, arginine or cysteine residues), based on a simple synthesis and derivation procedure, that allows us to obtain very similar NPs (size and shape of the magnetic core). In this way, we assure that the main difference in the synthesized NPs are the oxalate or amino acid residue exposed, an ideal situation to compare their bacterial capture performance, and so too the interactions among them. Field emission scanning electron microscopy showed homogeneous distribution of particle sizes for all systems synthesized, close to 10 nm. Magnetization, zeta potential, Fourier transformed infrared spectrometry and other studies allow us further characterization. Capture experiments of Pseudomonas putida bacterial strain showed a high level of efficiency, independently of the amino acid used to wrap the NP, when compared with oxalate. We show that bacterial capture efficiency cannot be related mostly to the bacterial and NP superficial charge relationship (as determined by z potential), but instead capture can be correlated with hydrophobic and hydrophilic forces among them. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Direct Determination of the Distribution Coefficient of Tridecyl Dimethyl Phosphine Oxide between Water and Hexane
Colloids Interfaces 2018, 2(3), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/colloids2030028
Received: 8 June 2018 / Revised: 4 July 2018 / Accepted: 11 July 2018 / Published: 15 July 2018
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Abstract
Drop profile analysis tensiometry is applied to determine the distribution coefficient of a nonionic surfactant for a water/hexane system. The basic idea is to measure the interfacial tension isotherm in two configurations: a hexane drop immersed in the surfactant aqueous solutions at different
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Drop profile analysis tensiometry is applied to determine the distribution coefficient of a nonionic surfactant for a water/hexane system. The basic idea is to measure the interfacial tension isotherm in two configurations: a hexane drop immersed in the surfactant aqueous solutions at different bulk concentrations, and a water drop immersed into a hexane solution of the same surfactant. Both types of experiments lead to an isotherm for the equilibrium interfacial tensions with the same slope but with a concentration shift between them. This shift refers exactly to the value of the distribution coefficient. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Polymer Flow in Porous Media: Relevance to Enhanced Oil Recovery
Colloids Interfaces 2018, 2(3), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/colloids2030027
Received: 1 June 2018 / Revised: 26 June 2018 / Accepted: 3 July 2018 / Published: 10 July 2018
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Abstract
Polymer flooding is one of the most successful chemical EOR (enhanced oil recovery) methods, and is primarily implemented to accelerate oil production by sweep improvement. However, additional benefits have extended the utility of polymer flooding. During the last decade, it has been evaluated
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Polymer flooding is one of the most successful chemical EOR (enhanced oil recovery) methods, and is primarily implemented to accelerate oil production by sweep improvement. However, additional benefits have extended the utility of polymer flooding. During the last decade, it has been evaluated for use in an increasing number of fields, both offshore and onshore. This is a consequence of (1) improved polymer properties, which extend their use to HTHS (high temperature high salinity) conditions and (2) increased understanding of flow mechanisms such as those for heavy oilmobilization. A key requirement for studying polymer performance is the control and prediction of in-situ porous medium rheology. The first part of this paper reviews recent developments in polymer flow in porous medium, with a focus on polymer in-situ rheology and injectivity. The second part of this paper reports polymer flow experiments conducted using the most widely applied polymer for EOR processes, HPAM (partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide). The experiments addressed highrate, near-wellbore behavior (radial flow), reservoir rate steady-state flow (linear flow) and the differences observed in terms of flow conditions. In addition, the impact of oil on polymer rheology was investigated and compared to single-phase polymer flow in Bentheimer sandstone rock material. Results show that the presence of oil leads to a reduction in apparent viscosity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Colloids and Interfaces in Oil Recovery)
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Open AccessArticle Effect of Polysorbates on Solids Wettability and Their Adsorption Properties
Colloids Interfaces 2018, 2(3), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/colloids2030026
Received: 25 June 2018 / Revised: 5 July 2018 / Accepted: 6 July 2018 / Published: 8 July 2018
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Abstract
The wettability of solids is important from both practical and theoretical viewpoints. In this study, we measured the contact angle of aqueous solutions of polysorbates (Tween 20, Tween 60, and Tween 80) on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polyethylene (PE), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polyamide (nylon 6),
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The wettability of solids is important from both practical and theoretical viewpoints. In this study, we measured the contact angle of aqueous solutions of polysorbates (Tween 20, Tween 60, and Tween 80) on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polyethylene (PE), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polyamide (nylon 6), and quartz. Based on the obtained results, the adsorption of Tween 20 (T20), Tween 60 (T60), and Tween 80 (T80) at the solid-water interface was determined based on the structure and size of their molecules. Next, the tendency of polysorbates to adsorb at the solid-water interface was considered based on the Gibbs standard free energy of adsorption (ΔGadso). This energy was evaluated using various methods, including a method we propose based on the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and the contact angle of water and solution at the CMC, as well as their surface tension. The ΔGadso values obtained by this method were comparable to those calculated from the Langmuir equation. Taking into account the Tweens tendency to adsorb at the solid-water interface, the measured contact angle, the components and parameters of surface tension of Tweens solutions and solids, and the surface tension of water and its Lifshitz-van der Waals component that we determined, the wetting process in the solid-solution drop-air system was analyzed. The results based on the mentioned parameters showed that it is possible to predict the wettability of apolar, monopolar, and bipolar solids using the aqueous Tweens solution and their solution adhesion. Full article
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Open AccessArticle CO2 Adsorption Property of Amine-Modified Amorphous TiO2 Nanoparticles with a High Surface Area
Colloids Interfaces 2018, 2(3), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/colloids2030025
Received: 23 May 2018 / Revised: 28 June 2018 / Accepted: 3 July 2018 / Published: 5 July 2018
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Abstract
Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies have attracted a great deal of attention as effective measures to prevent global warming. Adsorption methods using porous materials seem to have several advantages over the liquid absorption methods. In this study, we have developed a
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Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies have attracted a great deal of attention as effective measures to prevent global warming. Adsorption methods using porous materials seem to have several advantages over the liquid absorption methods. In this study, we have developed a synthesis method of new amorphous titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles with a diameter of 3 nm, a high surface area of 617 m2/g and a large amount of OH groups. Next, the surface of the amorphous TiO2 nanoparticles was modified using ethylenediamine to examine whether CO2 adsorption increases. Amorphous TiO2 nanoparticles were successfully modified with ethylenediamine, which was used in excess due to the presence of a large amount of hydroxyl groups. The amorphous TiO2 nanoparticles modified with ethylenediamine show a higher CO2 adsorption capacity (65 cm3/g at 0 °C, 100 kPa) than conventional TiO2 and mesoporous SiO2. We discuss the origin of the higher CO2 adsorption capacity in terms of the high specific surface area of the amorphous TiO2 nanoparticles and the modification with ethylenediamine on the surface of the amorphous TiO2 nanoparticles. The optimization of the amount of ethylenediamine bound on the particles increased the CO2 adsorption capacity without pore blocking. Full article
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