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Vet. Sci., Volume 2, Issue 1 (March 2015) – 6 articles , Pages 1-42

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Open AccessArticle
Development and Evaluation of a Novel Taqman Real-Time PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of Mycoplasma bovis: Comparison of Assay Performance with a Conventional PCR Assay and Another Taqman Real-Time PCR Assay
Vet. Sci. 2015, 2(1), 32-42; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci2010032 - 16 Mar 2015
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2045
Abstract
The objective of this study was to develop and validate a Taqman real-time PCR assay for the detection of Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis). Unique primers targeting the highly conserved house-keeping gene (uvrC) were designed and the probe sequence was [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to develop and validate a Taqman real-time PCR assay for the detection of Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis). Unique primers targeting the highly conserved house-keeping gene (uvrC) were designed and the probe sequence was derived from a previously published microarray study. There was 100% agreement in the outcome between our assay and the other two published assays for M. bovis detection. The analytical limit of detection of our assay is 83 copies of the uvrC gene. This assay was validated on a total of 214 bovine clinical specimens that were submitted to the Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory (TVMDL), Texas, USA. The specificity of the assay was assessed to be 100% since no cross-reactivity occurred with 22 other bacterial and other Mycoplasma species. We conclude that the uvrC gene serves as a good and reliable diagnostic marker for the accurate and rapid detection of M. bovis from a wider variety of specimen matrices. Full article
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Open AccessCommunication
Optimizing the Measurement of Colostrum Antibody Concentrations for Identifying BVDV Persistently Infected Calves
Vet. Sci. 2015, 2(1), 26-31; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci2010026 - 09 Mar 2015
Viewed by 2700
Abstract
Colostrum contains substantially higher concentrations of immunoglobulins compared to serum, which may help to improve the utility of diagnostic tests. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of colostrum antibody concentrations in identifying Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV) PI [...] Read more.
Colostrum contains substantially higher concentrations of immunoglobulins compared to serum, which may help to improve the utility of diagnostic tests. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of colostrum antibody concentrations in identifying Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV) PI (persistently infected) calf carrying beef heifers following an experimental infection. Colostrum was collected within 12 hours of parturition and tested in undiluted, 1:5, 1:10, 1:100, 1:200, and 1:500 dilutions using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for BVDV antibody. Cows were determined to be carrying a PI calf based on positive quantitative Real Time-Polymerase Chain Reaction and antigen ELISA result on pre-colostral serum and ear notch samples collected from their calf. The median ELISA sample-to-positive (S/P) ratio for colostrum collected from heifers that carried a PI calf were significantly higher than the median ELISA S/P ratio for colostrum collected from heifers that did not carry a PI calf at dilutions of 1:100, 1:200, and 1:500. This study provides further evidence for increased antigenic stimulation in utero by the BVDV viraemic PI calf, which can also be identified with 100% diagnostic sensitivity when using 1:500 dilution colostrum. Full article
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Open AccessComment
A Physician’s View of One Health: Challenges and Opportunities
Vet. Sci. 2015, 2(1), 23-25; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci2010023 - 16 Feb 2015
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2278
Abstract
One Health is one of the most important movements and emerging concepts in health today. The convergence of the fields of human and animal medicine has the potential to generate novel scientific hypotheses, create effective new therapies and potentially transform how physicians, veterinarians [...] Read more.
One Health is one of the most important movements and emerging concepts in health today. The convergence of the fields of human and animal medicine has the potential to generate novel scientific hypotheses, create effective new therapies and potentially transform how physicians, veterinarians and their patients understand health and disease. Despite this potential, One Health has not yet gained significant awareness or traction in human medical communities. From its inception, One Health, sometimes also called One Medicine, has been piloted primarily by leaders from the world of veterinary medicine. Although the specific term was coined perhaps 10 years ago, comparative medicine has been quietly evident on university campuses with veterinary and medical schools for decades longer. Although a few physicians have played major leadership roles in One Health, in the United States, despite over ten years of the movement’s robust growth, many have still not heard of it. Furthermore, physicians with some awareness of One Health often believe it to be primarily and exclusively about zoonotic infections and global health. The much broader scope and potential of One Health as also including comparative physiology and medicine is not being communicated effectively. Consequently, the human medical community remains largely disengaged. This is problematic because without significant engagement from physicians, nurses and other human health care professionals, the potential of One Health cannot be realized. To advance One Health it is imperative that we first understand the roots of under-engagement of the human medical community. This, in turn, can guide the development of novel and engaging opportunities for physician which demonstrate the power relevance of One Health’s comparative, collaborative and cooperative approach.[...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers)
Open AccessCase Report
Medical Management of Cyclosporine-Induced Gingival Overgrowth Using Oral Azithromycin in Six Dogs
Vet. Sci. 2015, 2(1), 13-22; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci2010013 - 05 Feb 2015
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2274
Abstract
Gingival overgrowth is an uncommon adverse effect of cyclosporine administration in veterinary species. In people, gingival overgrowth is a common complication of cyclosporine administration for immunosuppression, generally following transplant procedures. Azithromycin has been used successfully for managing gingival overgrowth in human transplant patients [...] Read more.
Gingival overgrowth is an uncommon adverse effect of cyclosporine administration in veterinary species. In people, gingival overgrowth is a common complication of cyclosporine administration for immunosuppression, generally following transplant procedures. Azithromycin has been used successfully for managing gingival overgrowth in human transplant patients when cyclosporine administration cannot be reduced or discontinued. This case series describes six dogs being administered cyclosporine for various dermatologic diseases that developed gingival overgrowth. The dogs were prescribed systemic azithromycin, with or without concurrent dose reduction of cyclosporine. Oral administration of 6.6–10.8 mg/kg of azithromycin once daily for 4–14 weeks was effective for complete clinical resolution of gingival overgrowth. In most cases, gingival overgrowth did not recur even with continued cyclosporine administration long-term. Adverse events of long-term azithromycin administration did not occur in any of the dogs. This series highlights a potentially beneficial medical treatment option for gingival overgrowth even when cyclosporine dose reduction is not possible or elected, without the need for surgical resection of proliferative gingival tissue. Full article
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Open AccessEditorial
Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Veterinary Sciences in 2014
Vet. Sci. 2015, 2(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci2010012 - 09 Jan 2015
Viewed by 1559
Abstract
The editors of Veterinary Sciences would like to express their sincere gratitude to the following reviewers for assessing manuscripts in 2014:[...] Full article
Open AccessArticle
Prevalence of Presenting Conditions in Grey Seal Pups (Halichoerus grypus) Admitted for Rehabilitation
Vet. Sci. 2015, 2(1), 1-11; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci2010001 - 05 Jan 2015
Viewed by 2415
Abstract
A retrospective survey was performed on the presenting conditions of 205 live grey seal pups (Halichoerus grypus) admitted to the Cornish Seal Sanctuary in Gweek, United Kingdom between May 2005 and March 2011. The purpose of the survey was to examine [...] Read more.
A retrospective survey was performed on the presenting conditions of 205 live grey seal pups (Halichoerus grypus) admitted to the Cornish Seal Sanctuary in Gweek, United Kingdom between May 2005 and March 2011. The purpose of the survey was to examine the prevalence of various presenting signs at the sanctuary. The presenting signs were classified into nine non-mutually exclusive categories: ocular disorders, nasal disorders, oral disorders, respiratory disorders, orthopaedic disorders, puncture wounds, abrasions, netting injuries, and onychia. The sex ratio of seal pups in this study was 1.35 males per female. Of the 205 examined for rehabilitation, 22 (10.73%) did not survive to release. 68.78% of grey seal pups presented with puncture wounds, 47.80% with respiratory disorders, 46.34% with ocular disorders, 42.63% malnourished, 36.59% with abrasions, 25.37% with oral disorders, 23.90% with nasal disorders, 11.71% with orthopaedic disorders, 9.27% with onychia, and 3.41% presented with netting injuries. 52% were normothermic, 42% were hyperthermic, and 5% were hypothermic. Associations between gender, outcome of rehabilitation, hospitalisation time and presenting disorders were examined. In addition, admissions rates were found to display seasonality. The results of this study will aid in future preparation of grey seal rehabilitation facilities. Full article
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