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Cosmetics, Volume 11, Issue 3 (June 2024) – 17 articles

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12 pages, 1023 KiB  
Article
Fractional Ablative Carbon Dioxide Laser versus Fractional Non-Ablative 1410 nm Diode Laser in the Treatment of Acne Scars: A Clinical and Immunohistochemical Study
by Mai Abdelraouf Osman, Shaimaa Mohamedadel Fawy, Dalia M. Abouelfadl, Mohamed Fouad Abdel Salam, Amin Sharobim and Abeer Attia Tawfik
Cosmetics 2024, 11(3), 81; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics11030081 (registering DOI) - 20 May 2024
Viewed by 100
Abstract
Background: Effectively managing acne scars while minimizing consequences is still a challenging task. The primary determinant in selecting and continuing therapy for a specific device is stimulating collagen production and dermal remodeling with the fewest possible complications. Objective: To evaluate the clinical and [...] Read more.
Background: Effectively managing acne scars while minimizing consequences is still a challenging task. The primary determinant in selecting and continuing therapy for a specific device is stimulating collagen production and dermal remodeling with the fewest possible complications. Objective: To evaluate the clinical and immunohistochemical results of ablative fractional carbon dioxide (FCO2) laser versus fractional non-ablative diode laser for treating facial acne scars. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with atrophic acne scars were included in a split-face comparative study. Right and left facial sides received three sessions of FCO2 and diode laser, respectively, at one-month intervals. One month after the third session, patients were evaluated using photographs, the Goodman and Baron qualitative and quantitative global scarring grading system, the investigator’s global assessment, and patient satisfaction. A sample was collected from the area that had been treated, and the tissue was examined using hematoxylin and eosin (H–E) staining and immunohistochemistry staining for collagen I. Results: Goodman and Baron global scores showed a statistically significant difference compared to baseline on both sides of the face. However, there was no statistically significant difference between the two treatment modalities. Biopsy specimens showed an increased deposition of collagen I by both laser devices, which was validated and described by immunohistochemistry staining. Conclusion: Both FCO2 and fractional non-ablative diode lasers proved their efficacy in treating different types of acne scars. For patients who are interested in no downtime and no complications, fractional non-ablative diode laser is recommended as an efficient alternative modality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Therapy and Phototherapy in Cosmetic Dermatology)
19 pages, 995 KiB  
Review
Deciphering the Effects of Different Types of Sunlight Radiation on Skin Function: A Review
by Sophia Letsiou, Elpida Koldiri, Apostolos Beloukas, Efstathios Rallis and Vasiliki Kefala
Cosmetics 2024, 11(3), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics11030080 (registering DOI) - 20 May 2024
Viewed by 190
Abstract
Sunlight radiation is a fundamental component of our daily lives. Specifically, blue light as well as UV light appear to play a role in the development of oxidative stress, DNA damage, photoaging, and pigmentation through the chromophores in skin tissues. However, several skin [...] Read more.
Sunlight radiation is a fundamental component of our daily lives. Specifically, blue light as well as UV light appear to play a role in the development of oxidative stress, DNA damage, photoaging, and pigmentation through the chromophores in skin tissues. However, several skin problems like psoriasis, eczema, and atopic dermatitis can be avoided with short-duration exposures to low-energy blue light radiation or UV radiation. In addition, exploring the effects of blue light as well as UV radiation on skin is quite essential for the development of minimally invasive antiaging strategies and for the design of innovative cosmetic formulations in modern aesthetics and cosmetology. Thus, in this review, we present the advantages as well as the disadvantages of light radiation, with a special focus on blue light and UV radiation activity on the human skin. We also discuss the molecular action of blue light and UV radiation on human skin. Other types of light radiation are included to holistically approach the effect of light on human skin. Full article
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16 pages, 294 KiB  
Review
Computational Methods as Part of Scientific Research in Cosmetic Sciences—Are We Using the Opportunity?
by Laura Krumpholz, Sebastian Polak and Barbara Wiśniowska
Cosmetics 2024, 11(3), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics11030079 - 14 May 2024
Viewed by 421
Abstract
In the field of the cosmetic industry, significant efforts are made to develop methods that are not only cost effective and time effective but are also environmentally friendly and cruelty free. Cosmetic tests using in vivo animal models are currently banned in the [...] Read more.
In the field of the cosmetic industry, significant efforts are made to develop methods that are not only cost effective and time effective but are also environmentally friendly and cruelty free. Cosmetic tests using in vivo animal models are currently banned in the European Union. To fulfil regulatory requirements, new approach methodologies (NAMs) are implemented, and thereupon, in silico techniques have constantly acquired significance. This review aimed to show the general picture of the available computational methods and approaches, give some examples of their applications, present capabilities and limitations, and propose the way forward. The general information about in silico modelling and examples of its usage in the context of cosmetics and its legal regulation are presented. The review is divided with a focus on three endpoints of interest: (1) safety assessment, (2) exposure assessment, and (3) formulation characterization. With this comprehensive analysis, we try to answer the question as to whether we are using the opportunity. Full article
22 pages, 10723 KiB  
Review
Contact Dermatitis Due to Hair Care Products: A Comprehensive Review
by Marta Cebolla-Verdugo, Juan Pablo Velasco-Amador and Francisco José Navarro-Triviño
Cosmetics 2024, 11(3), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics11030078 - 9 May 2024
Viewed by 484
Abstract
Hair cosmetics are in fashion. Numerous products are commonly used in combination. Frequent allergens are present in hair cosmetics, which, with almost daily use, increase the risk of sensitization. Familiarity with the clinical distribution of the eczematous rash is necessary to seriously consider [...] Read more.
Hair cosmetics are in fashion. Numerous products are commonly used in combination. Frequent allergens are present in hair cosmetics, which, with almost daily use, increase the risk of sensitization. Familiarity with the clinical distribution of the eczematous rash is necessary to seriously consider patch testing. Not all the products on the market are haptens. It is necessary to know how to patch your own products. When avoidance of the allergen is not possible, new treatments are evaluated to combat allergic contact dermatitis, mainly of the occupational type. In this manuscript, a complete and practical review of the main allergens and contact sources of hair cosmetic origin has been carried out. Full article
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12 pages, 2478 KiB  
Article
Effect of Fermentation and Extraction Techniques on the Physicochemical Composition of Copoazú Butter (Theobroma grandiflorum) as an Ingredient for the Cosmetic Industry
by Luisa L. Orduz-Díaz, Kimberly Lozano-Garzón, Willian Quintero-Mendoza, Raquel Díaz, Juliana E. C. Cardona-Jaramillo, Marcela P. Carrillo, Diana Carolina Guerrero and Maria Soledad Hernández
Cosmetics 2024, 11(3), 77; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics11030077 - 8 May 2024
Viewed by 561
Abstract
The Copoazú is a Theobroma species of Amazonian origin, and its derived products have a high content of lipids valuable for both the cosmetic and food industries. The composition of the butter extracted from its seeds can vary depending on the postharvest process [...] Read more.
The Copoazú is a Theobroma species of Amazonian origin, and its derived products have a high content of lipids valuable for both the cosmetic and food industries. The composition of the butter extracted from its seeds can vary depending on the postharvest process and the diverse extraction techniques employed. In this study, the composition of this butter processed with and without seed fermentation was analyzed using two extraction techniques: expeller pressing and hydraulic pressing. Parameters such as lipid profile, quality indexes, melting point, and the content of phytosterols and glyceric compounds were compared with a highly sought-after commercial raw material assessed through standardized volumetric and spectroscopic methodologies. The results showed that non-fermentation and cold-pressing conditions preserved the properties of the butter. This analysis is the first step in a standardized process for developing high-quality cosmetic ingredients derived from Copoazú butter. Full article
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17 pages, 722 KiB  
Review
Polyglutamate: Unleashing the Versatility of a Biopolymer for Cosmetic Industry Applications
by Mónica Serra, Eduardo Gudina, Cláudia Botelho, José António Teixeira and Ana Novo Barros
Cosmetics 2024, 11(3), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics11030076 - 8 May 2024
Viewed by 539
Abstract
Polyglutamic acid (PGA), a biopolymer comprising repeating units of glutamic acid, has garnered significant attention owing to its versatile applications. In recent years, microbial production processes have emerged as promising methods for the large-scale synthesis of PGA, offering advantages such as sustainability, efficiency, [...] Read more.
Polyglutamic acid (PGA), a biopolymer comprising repeating units of glutamic acid, has garnered significant attention owing to its versatile applications. In recent years, microbial production processes have emerged as promising methods for the large-scale synthesis of PGA, offering advantages such as sustainability, efficiency, and tailored molecular properties. Beyond its industrial applications, PGA exhibits unique properties that render it an attractive candidate for use in the cosmetic industry. The biocompatibility, water solubility, and film-forming characteristics of PGA make it an ideal ingredient for cosmetic formulations. This article explores the extensive potential cosmetic applications of PGA, highlighting its multifaceted role in skincare, haircare, and various beauty products. From moisturizing formulations to depigmentating agents and sunscreen products, PGA offers a wide array of benefits. Its ability to deeply hydrate the skin and hair makes it an ideal ingredient for moisturizers, conditioners, and hydrating masks. Moreover, PGA’s depigmentating properties contribute to the reduction in hyperpigmentation and uneven skin tone, enhancing the overall complexion. As the demand for sustainable and bio-derived cosmetic ingredients escalates, comprehending the microbial production and cosmetic benefits of PGA becomes crucial for driving innovation in the cosmetic sector. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Sources for Cosmetic Ingredients: Challenges and Innovations)
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13 pages, 3306 KiB  
Article
Effects of Chlorinated Water on Neurite Length of Cultured Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons and Semaphorin 3A Content of Cultured Epidermal Keratinocytes
by Kazuhisa Maeda, Neneka Okumura, Aoba Ogawa and Hatsumi Takeda
Cosmetics 2024, 11(3), 75; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics11030075 - 7 May 2024
Viewed by 517
Abstract
The tap water that we normally use contains certain concentrations of free residual chlorine to kill microorganisms and viruses and make it safe for use. Water containing free residual chlorine not only dries out our hair and skin but can also cause irritation [...] Read more.
The tap water that we normally use contains certain concentrations of free residual chlorine to kill microorganisms and viruses and make it safe for use. Water containing free residual chlorine not only dries out our hair and skin but can also cause irritation and itching in some people—especially those with sensitive skin or reduced skin barrier function. We investigated the effects of free residual chlorine on cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons and cultured epidermal keratinocytes. First, we measured neurite length in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. Next, to evaluate the effects of chlorine on semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) and nerve growth factor (NGF) levels in cultured human epidermal keratinocytes, we used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure NGF in the supernatant and polymerase chain reaction and Western blot to determine Sema3A and NGF levels. Chlorine elongated the neurite length and increased the number of projections in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. Although there were no changes in NGF mRNA or protein levels in the supernatant of cultured human epidermal keratinocytes in the presence of chlorine, Sema3A mRNA and protein levels decreased, and the ratio of Sema3A to NGF was also reduced. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 10th Anniversary of Cosmetics—Recent Advances and Perspectives)
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21 pages, 1276 KiB  
Review
Adult Female Acne: Recent Advances in Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Approaches
by Andreea Amuzescu, Mircea Tampa, Clara Matei and Simona Roxana Georgescu
Cosmetics 2024, 11(3), 74; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics11030074 - 5 May 2024
Viewed by 785
Abstract
Adult acne is a chronic inflammatory disease of the pilosebaceous unit characterized by the excessive production of abnormal sebum favoring an imbalance of the skin microbiota and the hyperproliferation of Cutibacterium acnes and other virulent microbial strains, leading to an inflammatory environment, innate [...] Read more.
Adult acne is a chronic inflammatory disease of the pilosebaceous unit characterized by the excessive production of abnormal sebum favoring an imbalance of the skin microbiota and the hyperproliferation of Cutibacterium acnes and other virulent microbial strains, leading to an inflammatory environment, innate immunity overactivation, and keratinocyte hyperproliferation in hair follicles pores. Degraded keratinocytes plug the pores, consequently forming microcomedons, which can later evolve to papules, nodules, pustules and scars. Distinct from juvenile acne, in adult female acne (AFA) the symptomatology occurs or persists in postadolescence (after age 25). Although hyperandrogenism or the excessive sensitivity of androgen receptors are the main causes, AFA can be triggered by multiple factors, either including or not including androgen disturbances. The prevalence in adult women is 15–20%. Hyperandrogenism is present in 50% of cases; 70% of hyperandrogenism cases feature polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a complex endocrine and metabolic condition. Genetic susceptibility occurs in 80% of acne cases, often with familial inheritance. Beyond classical stepwise therapeutic protocols (topical agents, isotretinoin, antibiotics, hormonal therapy with estrogens, progestins, spironolactone), novel approaches include the highly effective topical antiandrogen clascoterone, the management of insulin resistance by diet, exercise, stress avoidance, and adjuvant therapies such as berberine. Vaccines against the pathogenic proinflammatory C. acnes hyaluronidase A are in development. Full article
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12 pages, 2266 KiB  
Article
Nicotinamide Riboside Ameliorates Hyperpigmentation on Photo-Irradiated Skin
by Yeon Jae Lee, Seul Gi Jang, Min Jeong Ryu and Seung Hee Choi
Cosmetics 2024, 11(3), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics11030073 - 5 May 2024
Viewed by 793
Abstract
Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is one of the most important and essential components within an organism. Extensive ongoing research is aimed at harnessing its potential in managing diverse diseases by supplying various forms of NAD in its oxidized state, NAD+. Ultraviolet [...] Read more.
Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is one of the most important and essential components within an organism. Extensive ongoing research is aimed at harnessing its potential in managing diverse diseases by supplying various forms of NAD in its oxidized state, NAD+. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the most common environmental exposure factor, but also carries many risks. UVR affects the epidermis and contributes to sunburn, photo-allergy, DNA damage, and certain cancers, notably melanoma. Research has shown that NAD+ precursors, including nicotinamide riboside (NR), reduce melanogenesis in aged melanocytes. In this study, we used NR to determine whether melanin hyperpigmentation was suppressed after light stimulation. We found that melanogenesis was inhibited when B16F10 cells treated with α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone were exposed to specific doses of NR. Additionally, tyrosinase activity (a key step in melanin production) was suppressed. However, there was no difference in the expression level of melanogenic genes. Ultraviolet B light directly stimulated HaCaT cells, inducing the RNA expression of metalloproteinases. Treatment with NR suppressed the corresponding gene expression and reduced cytotoxicity. This study demonstrates the possibility of using NR as a new skin-whitening ingredient due to its inhibitory effect on hyperpigmentation and ability to maintain skin layers affected by UVR. Full article
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21 pages, 508 KiB  
Review
Cosmetic Formulations from Natural Sources: Safety Considerations and Legislative Frameworks in the European Union
by Maame Ekua Manful, Lubna Ahmed and Catherine Barry-Ryan
Cosmetics 2024, 11(3), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics11030072 - 4 May 2024
Viewed by 1120
Abstract
Consumer preferences, safety, and sustainability aspects of conventional cosmetic ingredients have contributed to an increase in the demand for natural cosmetic ingredients and products. Naturally derived active cosmetic agents and excipients may come into contact with various naturally occurring and synthetic contaminants throughout [...] Read more.
Consumer preferences, safety, and sustainability aspects of conventional cosmetic ingredients have contributed to an increase in the demand for natural cosmetic ingredients and products. Naturally derived active cosmetic agents and excipients may come into contact with various naturally occurring and synthetic contaminants throughout the supply chain, and substantiating their safety is essential. This review examines the safety and legislative requirements applicable to natural cosmetic ingredients in the European Union (EU). Cosmetic safety requirements include technical data based on the ingredient profile, presence of hazards and the risks associated with the intended conditions of use. The hazard analysis includes screening for microbial contaminants such as aerobic mesophilic bacteria, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans; chemical contaminants such as lead, cadmium, arsenic, and mercury; and naturally occurring toxins, such as allergens. The toxicological assessment considers both local effects (such as skin sensitisation, eye/skin irritation, and photo-induced effects) and systemic effects (including acute dermal toxicity, sub-acute and sub-chronic toxicity, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity, reproductive toxicity, and toxicokinetics). The EU legislative requirements prohibit the use of animal-based tests for the toxicological evaluation of cosmetic ingredients, paving the way for alternatives termed as New Approach Methodologies (NAMs). The validation of NAMs is critical for their wider usage, and despite advancements, few have been validated, particularly for systemic toxicity testing. The use of NAMs in evaluating the safety of complex natural cosmetic ingredients is further examined. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Sources for Cosmetic Ingredients: Challenges and Innovations)
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10 pages, 2070 KiB  
Article
Efficacy and Safety of Monopolar Radiofrequency for Tightening the Skin of Aged Faces
by JungMin Shin, Yeounkuk Sung, Soyoung Jin, Cho-Long Hwang, Hyunjung Kim, Dongkyun Hong, Kyung Eun Jung, Young-Joon Seo and Young Lee
Cosmetics 2024, 11(3), 71; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics11030071 - 3 May 2024
Viewed by 729
Abstract
Background: Monopolar radiofrequency (RF) has emerged as a promising modality for tightening the skin of aged faces. Although many studies have assessed the efficacy of monopolar RF via the clinical evaluation of photographs, few have examined the long-term effectiveness and safety of this [...] Read more.
Background: Monopolar radiofrequency (RF) has emerged as a promising modality for tightening the skin of aged faces. Although many studies have assessed the efficacy of monopolar RF via the clinical evaluation of photographs, few have examined the long-term effectiveness and safety of this therapy using various skin testing devices. Methods: Twenty women with aged faces participated in this study. After a single monopolar RF treatment, three blinded dermatologists who were not involved in the treatment evaluated its clinical efficacy and safety after 4, 12, and 24 weeks. Skin firmness, fine wrinkles, skin pores, and skin tone were also measured using an indentometer (Courage+Khazaka Electronic GmbH, Köln, Germany) and a facial aging measurement device (Mark-Vu; PSI Plus, Suwon-si, Republic of Korea). Results: Skin laxity in the jowls and nasolabial folds showed significant improvement 12 weeks after the single monopolar RF treatment when evaluated by dermatologists, and this improvement lasted 24 weeks (p < 0.05). Moreover, the participants reported improvement at 4 weeks compared to baseline which lasted 24 weeks (p < 0.05). Skin firmness measured in the cheek increased 4 weeks after treatment and continued to improve during 24 weeks of follow-up (p < 0.01). Although there was a gradual increase in improvement in skin pores, fine wrinkles, and skin tones, there were no statistical differences compared to the baseline. No patients experienced pain during the treatment, and no burns, skin breakdown, or scarring occurred after treatment. Conclusions: A single monopolar RF treatment is effective for females with aged face. A significant improvement in the jowls and nasolabial folds and facial skin firmness was observed between the 4- and 24-week follow-ups without adverse effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 10th Anniversary of Cosmetics—Recent Advances and Perspectives)
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12 pages, 11249 KiB  
Article
Advancing Lip Augmentation: State-of-the-Art 2D and 3D Analysis for Assessing Volume Enhancement and Lip Line Redefinition
by Ritamaria Di Lorenzo, Lucia Ricci, Eleonora Vardaro, Teresa Di Serio, Elena Morelli and Sonia Laneri
Cosmetics 2024, 11(3), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics11030070 - 3 May 2024
Viewed by 631
Abstract
Over the preceding five decades, there has been a noticeable surge in the pursuit of achieving voluminous and well-defined lips. This trend has prompted an escalating number of individuals to undergo lip augmentation procedures, aiming for a natural three-dimensional enhancement of lip volume [...] Read more.
Over the preceding five decades, there has been a noticeable surge in the pursuit of achieving voluminous and well-defined lips. This trend has prompted an escalating number of individuals to undergo lip augmentation procedures, aiming for a natural three-dimensional enhancement of lip volume and distinct vermilion borders. Despite the proliferation of lip augmentation techniques, there remains a dearth of comprehensive investigations into their precise effects on the three-dimensional structural integrity of the lips. This research endeavors to address this gap by employing stereophotogrammetry as a quantitative tool to scrutinize lip augmentation outcomes and to appraise the efficacy of lip plumpers. The study methodology involves a comparative analysis of lip dimensions among subjects treated with a commercial lip plumper using multi-spectral imaging for lip dimension assessment, coupled with markerless tracking technology and 3D interpolating surface methodology to analyze lip volume and shape. Additionally, the study evaluated lip youth state, including moisture level, softness, firmness, and tissue density. The demand for lip augmentation procedures is driven by perceived advantages such as quick recovery and minimal risk. Therefore, it is crucial to substantiate their efficacy with robust findings. The investigation suggests that both 3D and 2D stereophotogrammetry techniques are reliable for evaluating lip size before and after augmentation, whether through cosmetic or aesthetic approaches. Overall, the study provides a comprehensive analysis of a lip treatment aimed at enhancing volume and redesigning lip lines. It demonstrates that stereophotogrammetry is effective for assessing 3D lip dimensions and their correlation with internal lip structure. This research could be particularly valuable for evaluating the efficacy and duration of various lip enhancement techniques, including dermal fillers, implants, and topical cosmetic formulations, offering quantitative and reproducible assessments over time. Full article
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11 pages, 1346 KiB  
Article
Artichoke Leaf Extract Effectiveness on the Skin Aging Exposome: Efficacy and Safety Results of a Split-Face Study
by Gloria Roveda, Enza Cestone, Francesca De Gennaro, Andrea Poggi, Violetta Insolia, Vincenzo Zaccaria and Vincenzo Nobile
Cosmetics 2024, 11(3), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics11030069 - 3 May 2024
Viewed by 664
Abstract
The skin is a barrier organ subjected to lifelong exposure to internal and external factors influencing both its biological response and appearance. A randomized split-face study was carried out on 22 adult female outdoor workers using an artichoke leaf extract (CynageTM). [...] Read more.
The skin is a barrier organ subjected to lifelong exposure to internal and external factors influencing both its biological response and appearance. A randomized split-face study was carried out on 22 adult female outdoor workers using an artichoke leaf extract (CynageTM). The product’s efficacy was measured before and after 28 days of use. The following skin parameters were measured: wrinkle depth, skin roughness, and radiance, to assess the product’s effect on the skin appearance; Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power (FRAP), to assess the total antioxidant capacity; and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels, to assess the anti-inflammatory efficacy. These parameters were also integrated by the evaluation of the subjective perception of product efficacy. After 28 days of product use, the skin’s appearance improved as follows: wrinkle depth and skin roughness decreased by 5.2% and 7.0%, respectively, while the skin radiance increased by 19.0%. The total antioxidant capacity of the skin increased by 20.2%. The skin’s TNF-α levels decreased by 8.2%. The product efficacy was also perceived by the subjects participating in the study. The product was well tolerated. Our findings demonstrate the active role of the ingredient in decreasing the skin damage induced by the exposome. Full article
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16 pages, 4216 KiB  
Article
Development of Cosmetic Formulations Containing Olive Extract and Spirulina sp.: Stability and Clinical Efficacy Studies
by Gabriela Maria D’Angelo Costa and Patricia Maria Berardo Gonçalves Maia Campos
Cosmetics 2024, 11(3), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics11030068 - 1 May 2024
Viewed by 820
Abstract
Cosmetic formulations with natural antioxidants can reduce the oxidative stress caused by solar radiation and pollution. In this context, the aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the clinical efficacy of cosmetic formulations containing olive extract (OE) and Spirulina sp. (SP). [...] Read more.
Cosmetic formulations with natural antioxidants can reduce the oxidative stress caused by solar radiation and pollution. In this context, the aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the clinical efficacy of cosmetic formulations containing olive extract (OE) and Spirulina sp. (SP). For this, rheological behavior, texture, and sensory properties were evaluated. In addition, 31 healthy women with an age of 39 to 60 years, with skin phototypes II and III, and the presence of signs of photoaging on the face were recruited and divided in Group 1 (vehicle formulation) and Group 2 (vehicle with active substances) for this clinical efficacy study. Both groups applied sunscreen daily during the day. The formulations showed non-Newtonian pseudoplastic behaviors and good sensory properties. The clinical evaluation using instrumental measurements showed an increase in skin hydration, an improvement of the skin barrier, and morphological characteristics of the epidermis after 12 weeks of application of the formulations. There was a significant increase in the brightness of the stratum corneum, which suggested a film-forming effect. In addition, both groups had an improvement in the dermis echogenicity, due to the use of sunscreens. Finally, the proposed formulation was effective in protecting the skin and reducing skin changes related to photoaging. Full article
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3 pages, 156 KiB  
Editorial
Fine Chemicals from Natural Sources with Potential Application in the Cosmetic/Pharmaceutical Industry
by Agnieszka Feliczak-Guzik
Cosmetics 2024, 11(3), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics11030067 - 30 Apr 2024
Viewed by 640
Abstract
There is no doubt that chemistry has provided countless products that have improved people’s lives in almost every aspect [...] Full article
2 pages, 1417 KiB  
Correction
Correction: Sritananuwat et al. Effectiveness and Safety of Boesenbergia rotunda Extract on 3T3-L1 Preadipocytes and Its Use in Capsaicin-Loaded Body-Firming Formulation: In Vitro Biological Study and In Vivo Human Study. Cosmetics 2024, 11, 24
by Phaijit Sritananuwat, Tipada Samseethong, Kusuma Jitsaeng, Sureewan Duangjit, Praneet Opanasopit and Worranan Rangsimawong
Cosmetics 2024, 11(3), 66; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics11030066 - 25 Apr 2024
Viewed by 626
Abstract
In the original publication [...] Full article
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16 pages, 4824 KiB  
Article
Stability and Retention of Nanoemulsion Formulations Incorporating Lavender Essential Oil
by Konstantina Flekka, Virginia D. Dimaki, Elena Mourelatou, Konstantinos Avgoustakis, Fotini N. Lamari and Sophia Hatziantoniou
Cosmetics 2024, 11(3), 65; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics11030065 - 23 Apr 2024
Viewed by 814
Abstract
Lavender essential oil (LEO) is applied topically for its soothing properties, serving not only as an antiseptic in wound care but also as an insect repellent. This study investigates the impact of carrier systems on LEO encapsulation, stability, and release kinetics for potential [...] Read more.
Lavender essential oil (LEO) is applied topically for its soothing properties, serving not only as an antiseptic in wound care but also as an insect repellent. This study investigates the impact of carrier systems on LEO encapsulation, stability, and release kinetics for potential skincare applications. The LEO carrier impact on skin hydration and barrier function was also evaluated. Conventional emulsions (CEs) and nanoemulsions (NEs) with (CELs and NELs, respectively) and without LEO incorporation were analyzed for physicochemical properties, stability, and release mechanisms. The droplet size distribution and ζ-potential remained consistent in both CE and CEL, showing the minimal influence of LEO on those parameters. NE and NEL exhibited enhanced stability and higher LEO retention compared to CE and CEL (37.38 mg/mL ± 0.48 mg/mL and 50.96 mg/mL ± 2.00 mg/mL, respectively, p < 0.05), suggesting NE as a superior carrier system for LEO delivery. NEL retained LEO over 60 days at 4 °C without a significant reduction while CEL showed a notable reduction of 94.93% ± 0.08%. Release kinetics analysis showed zero-order release kinetics of LEO from both CEL and NEL (R2: 0.973 and 0.952, respectively), revealing a diffusion-based mechanism, particularly evident in NE formulations, supporting the controlled and sustained release of LEO constituents. NEL also promoted quicker skin barrier repair and enhanced skin hydration, sustaining effects for up to 120 min post application, surpassing CEL’s performance. These findings contribute to understanding the carrier system effects on LEO delivery and underscore NE as a promising vehicle for skincare applications. Further research should explore underlying mechanisms and conduct long-term safety and efficacy studies to fully exploit the therapeutic potential of NE in dermatological applications. Full article
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