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Adm. Sci., Volume 5, Issue 2 (June 2015) , Pages 27-124

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Open AccessArticle The Balanced Scorecard: Fashion or Virus?
Adm. Sci. 2015, 5(2), 90-124; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci5020090
Received: 17 March 2015 / Revised: 12 May 2015 / Accepted: 14 May 2015 / Published: 8 June 2015
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3516 | PDF Full-text (202 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The Balanced Scorecard (BSC) is a one of the most popular and contagious management ideas of our time. In previous research the diffusion and institutionalization of the BSC has been viewed through different theoretical lenses, most notably the management fashion perspective. Recently the [...] Read more.
The Balanced Scorecard (BSC) is a one of the most popular and contagious management ideas of our time. In previous research the diffusion and institutionalization of the BSC has been viewed through different theoretical lenses, most notably the management fashion perspective. Recently the virus perspective has been introduced as an alternative theory of how management ideas spread, but so far no study has applied this theory in the context of the BSC. In this paper we show that the fashion and virus perspectives provide complementary insights into the diffusion and institutionalization of the BSC. The fashion perspective is particularly well suited for explaining the infectiousness of the BSC and the ways in which organizations are exposed to the BSC idea. The virus theory can better explain how the BSC idea is implemented as a practice in organizations, and the different trajectories that the BSC idea may take in different contexts. A combination of these two perspectives provides a fuller picture of the diffusion and institutionalization of the BSC. Full article
Open AccessEditorial Administrative Sciences Introduces Double Blind Peer-Review
Adm. Sci. 2015, 5(2), 88-89; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci5020088
Received: 1 June 2015 / Accepted: 1 June 2015 / Published: 1 June 2015
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Abstract
Peer-review has become, and remains, the cornerstone on which scientific publication is built. Despite criticism, it remains almost the only method by which acceptance into the corpus of research literature is based. [...] Full article
Open AccessArticle Is the Asset Transfer of Public Leisure Facilities in England an Example of Associative Democracy?
Adm. Sci. 2015, 5(2), 71-87; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci5020071
Received: 30 March 2015 / Revised: 21 April 2015 / Accepted: 4 May 2015 / Published: 11 May 2015
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2755 | PDF Full-text (80 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In England, public sports facilities and libraries provided by local government are being transferred to management and delivery by volunteers. The catalyst for this development has been reductions in local government budgets. However, case studies explore if this asset transfer “offers a way [...] Read more.
In England, public sports facilities and libraries provided by local government are being transferred to management and delivery by volunteers. The catalyst for this development has been reductions in local government budgets. However, case studies explore if this asset transfer “offers a way of restoring the ideal of committed public service in the face of widespread bureaucratic failure and retreat”, as a form of associative democracy and empowerment of both the volunteers and those for whom the services are provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nonprofit Governance: Concepts, Visions, and Perspectives)
Open AccessArticle Understanding Cultural Difference Management through Charles Taylor’s Philosophy: Case Studies from the Food Processing Industry
Adm. Sci. 2015, 5(2), 46-70; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci5020046
Received: 30 December 2014 / Revised: 2 April 2015 / Accepted: 21 April 2015 / Published: 28 April 2015
Viewed by 2544 | PDF Full-text (127 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper, we use the work of the philosopher, Charles Taylor, to investigate the role of culture on internationalization decisions. Using parameters related to key constructs such as positive liberty, social ontology, expressivism, civic republicanism and common spaces, we look at how [...] Read more.
In this paper, we use the work of the philosopher, Charles Taylor, to investigate the role of culture on internationalization decisions. Using parameters related to key constructs such as positive liberty, social ontology, expressivism, civic republicanism and common spaces, we look at how culture influences the decisions regarding corporate international expansion. This framework was applied in a multi-interview design in four firms from the food processing industry from France and Canada. Results showed an obvious sensitivity to cultural difference and that managerial practices surrounding this issue tended to be intuitive and emergent. These practices were not crystallized in the form of a conscious and deliberate organizational strategy for dealing with cultural difference when planning foreign market entry. Our findings triggered further reflections on managerial implications such as the importance of searching more explicitly for cultural and organizational anchors when reviewing location factors. Full article
Open AccessArticle Business Contingency, Strategy Formation, and Firm Performance: An Empirical Study of Chinese Apparel SMEs
Adm. Sci. 2015, 5(2), 27-45; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci5020027
Received: 27 October 2014 / Revised: 11 March 2015 / Accepted: 25 March 2015 / Published: 30 March 2015
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2539 | PDF Full-text (203 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study empirically investigated how small and medium-sized Chinese apparel enterprises (SME) formed their strategy as a response to the characteristics of business environment in order to achieve competitive business performance. An environment-strategy-performance model was proposed and tested. Using primary data gathered by [...] Read more.
This study empirically investigated how small and medium-sized Chinese apparel enterprises (SME) formed their strategy as a response to the characteristics of business environment in order to achieve competitive business performance. An environment-strategy-performance model was proposed and tested. Using primary data gathered by a questionnaire survey of the Chinese apparel industry, factor analysis and structural equation modeling (SEM) were conducted for measurement and structural model analysis and hypothesis testing. Results show the proposed model met parsimonious statistical criteria. The differences in strategy responses to environment between high- and low-performing firms were striking. Confronting an increasingly turbulent business environment, high performers emphasized differentiation strategy through higher quality, better delivery performance, and greater flexibility than cost reduction. In contrast, low performers prioritized low cost while quality and flexibility were given certain weights. The lack of clear focus on strategies could result in a relatively lower performance. While the process of government-led industrial upgrading continues, forward-looking firms have proactively shifted their strategic focus from solely or mainly cost reduction to a variety of differentiating factors which bring in added value and are less imitable by competitors. Full article
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