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Behav. Sci., Volume 14, Issue 2 (February 2024) – 68 articles

Cover Story (view full-size image): This study examines the proactive role of Druze and Muslim kindergarten teachers in addressing and coping with the CSA of their kindergarten students in Israel. The study used a qualitative thematic analysis to investigate, and it revealed three distinct themes: (1) participants experienced fear and concern for their own children and themselves when dealing with CSA incidents involving their students; (2) they took a proactive role inside their homes to protect their own children; and (3) there was proactivity among educators within religious communities, using professional and religious principles to support CSA survivors and raise awareness among parents. The study highlights the need for comprehensive, ethnically and religiously relevant, support for kindergarten teachers facing CSA in their schools. View this paper
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17 pages, 857 KiB  
Article
The Consequences of Anthropomorphic and Teleological Beliefs in a Global Pandemic
by Andrew J. Roberts, Simon Handley and Vince Polito
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 146; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020146 - 19 Feb 2024
Viewed by 926
Abstract
To describe something in terms of its purpose or function is to describe its teleology. Previous studies have found that teleological beliefs are positively related to anthropomorphism, and that anthropomorphism decreases the perceived unpredictability of non-human agents. In the current study, we explore [...] Read more.
To describe something in terms of its purpose or function is to describe its teleology. Previous studies have found that teleological beliefs are positively related to anthropomorphism, and that anthropomorphism decreases the perceived unpredictability of non-human agents. In the current study, we explore these relationships using the highly salient example of beliefs about the coronavirus pandemic. Results showed that both anthropomorphism and teleology were negatively associated with perceived uncertainty and threat, and positively associated with self-reported behavioural change in response to the pandemic. These findings suggest that highly anthropomorphic and teleological individuals may view coronavirus as agentive and goal-directed. While anthropomorphic and teleological beliefs may facilitate behavioural change in response to the pandemic, we also found that the associated reduction in uncertainty and threat may be detrimental to behavioural change. We discuss the implications of these findings for messaging about global events more broadly. Full article
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13 pages, 1449 KiB  
Article
Pitch Improvement in Attentional Blink: A Study across Audiovisual Asymmetries
by Haoping Yang, Biye Cai, Wenjie Tan, Li Luo and Zonghao Zhang
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 145; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020145 - 19 Feb 2024
Viewed by 639
Abstract
Attentional blink (AB) is a phenomenon in which the perception of a second target is impaired when it appears within 200–500 ms after the first target. Sound affects an AB and is accompanied by the appearance of an asymmetry during audiovisual integration, but [...] Read more.
Attentional blink (AB) is a phenomenon in which the perception of a second target is impaired when it appears within 200–500 ms after the first target. Sound affects an AB and is accompanied by the appearance of an asymmetry during audiovisual integration, but it is not known whether this is related to the tonal representation of sound. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of audiovisual asymmetry on attentional blink and whether the presentation of pitch improves the ability to detect a target during an AB that is accompanied by audiovisual asymmetry. The results showed that as the lag increased, the subject’s target recognition improved and the pitch produced further improvements. These improvements exhibited a significant asymmetry across the audiovisual channel. Our findings could contribute to better utilizations of audiovisual integration resources to improve attentional transients and auditory recognition decline, which could be useful in areas such as driving and education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Association between Visual Attention and Memory)
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14 pages, 874 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Career Plateaus on Job Performance: The Roles of Organizational Justice and Positive Psychological Capital
by Po-Chien Chang, Xinqi Geng and Qihai Cai
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 144; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020144 - 18 Feb 2024
Viewed by 980
Abstract
Previous studies suggest that career plateaus have detrimental effects on employees’ satisfaction and performance. Psychological distress generated by career plateaus hinders organizations from achieving the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (UNSDGs) of ‘health and well-being at work’ (SDG-3) and ‘decent work’ (SDG-8). How [...] Read more.
Previous studies suggest that career plateaus have detrimental effects on employees’ satisfaction and performance. Psychological distress generated by career plateaus hinders organizations from achieving the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (UNSDGs) of ‘health and well-being at work’ (SDG-3) and ‘decent work’ (SDG-8). How to mitigate the negative impact of career plateaus becomes the key to enhancing sustainable well-being at work. However, the influencing mechanisms of career plateaus have not been fully discussed, especially regarding employees’ psychological processes. Drawing on the equity theory and the conservation of resource theory, this study examines the influence mechanism of career plateaus on employee job performance via organizational justice, with positive psychological capital moderating the process. Mplus and the Process macro for SPSS are adopted to conduct confirmatory factor analysis and regression analyses. Building on 368 supervisor–employee paired questionnaires with an average of eight employees per supervisor, empirical results indicate that employees who encounter career plateaus reduce their perceived organizational justice to discourage them from performing well in their jobs. Positive psychological capital, however, mitigates the negative effects of career plateaus on perceived organizational justice and the indirect effects of career plateaus on job performance through organizational justice. Theoretically, this study advances our understanding of the influence mechanism of career plateaus on employees’ job performance. Practical implications are also drawn for organizations to alleviate the negative impact of career plateaus to promote sustainable well-being at work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Managing Organizational Behaviors for Sustainable Wellbeing at Work)
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16 pages, 892 KiB  
Article
Promoting or Prohibiting? Investigating How Time Pressure Influences Innovative Behavior under Stress-Mindset Conditions
by Yufan Zhou, Jianwei Zhang, Wenfeng Zheng and Mengmeng Fu
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 143; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020143 - 17 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1278
Abstract
The existing empirical evidence on the relationship between time pressure and innovative behavior is paradoxical. An intriguing yet unresolved question is “When does time pressure promote or prohibit innovative behavior, and how?” We theorize that the paradoxical effect of time pressure on innovative [...] Read more.
The existing empirical evidence on the relationship between time pressure and innovative behavior is paradoxical. An intriguing yet unresolved question is “When does time pressure promote or prohibit innovative behavior, and how?” We theorize that the paradoxical effect of time pressure on innovative behavior can be elucidated by the moderating role of stress mindset, and we also explore the mediating role of thriving at work. Our research involved a field study of 390 research and development personnel from eight enterprises and research institutes in China to test our proposed model. Results indicated that the stress-is-debilitating mindset negatively moderated the association between time pressure and thriving at work, while the stress-is-enhancing mindset positively moderated the link between time pressure and thriving at work. Furthermore, the findings demonstrated that the stress-is-debilitating mindset negatively moderated the indirect impact of time pressure on employees’ innovative behavior through thriving at work, while the stress-is-enhancing mindset positively moderated the indirect effect of time pressure on employees’ innovative behavior through thriving at work. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are also discussed. Full article
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14 pages, 253 KiB  
Article
“We Need to Raise Awareness and Never Give Up”: Israeli Druze and Muslim Arab Kindergarten Teachers’ Proactivity When Facing the Sexual Abuse of Their Students
by Noah Bar Gosen, Laura I. Sigad, Jordan Shaibe, Amani Halaby, Efrat Lusky-Weisrose and Dafna Tener
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 142; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020142 - 16 Feb 2024
Viewed by 754
Abstract
Kindergarten teachers are expected to lead the intervention process in cases of child sexual abuse (CSA) in their kindergarten. This study examines the proactive role of Druze and Muslim Arab kindergarten teachers in addressing and coping with the CSA of their kindergarten students [...] Read more.
Kindergarten teachers are expected to lead the intervention process in cases of child sexual abuse (CSA) in their kindergarten. This study examines the proactive role of Druze and Muslim Arab kindergarten teachers in addressing and coping with the CSA of their kindergarten students in Israel. A qualitative thematic analysis was used to investigate the semi-structured interviews conducted with eight Druze Arab and six Muslim Arab kindergarten teachers. Three distinct themes were revealed. The first theme described the participants’ fear and concern for their personal children and themselves when dealing with CSA incidents involving their students. The second and third themes described their proactive coping on two fronts: (1) inside their homes to protect their own children and (2) as educators within religious communities, using professional and religious principles to support CSA survivors and raise awareness among parents. The results emphasized the personal burden on kindergarten teachers coping with CSA in their kindergarten and, as mainly expressed by Druze kindergarten teachers, the contribution of religious values to CSA intervention and prevention processes among their students and communities. Thus, there is a need for comprehensive support that considers ethnic and religious characteristics and will be available to kindergarten teachers facing CSA in their kindergarten. Full article
18 pages, 3373 KiB  
Article
Exploring the Role of Determinants Affecting Responsible Underwater Behaviour of Marine-Based Tourists
by Ke Zhang, Lewis T. O. Cheung, Theresa W. L. Lam, Anson T. H. Ma and Lincoln Fok
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 141; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020141 - 16 Feb 2024
Viewed by 731
Abstract
This study utilised divers’ demographic characteristics, diving experience, and attitudes to analyse the association between these factors and divers’ responsible underwater behaviour among Chinese scuba divers in Hong Kong. More innovatively, the measurement construct of diving attitude was further employed as a mediator [...] Read more.
This study utilised divers’ demographic characteristics, diving experience, and attitudes to analyse the association between these factors and divers’ responsible underwater behaviour among Chinese scuba divers in Hong Kong. More innovatively, the measurement construct of diving attitude was further employed as a mediator to investigate its influence on the relationship between divers’ diving experience and responsible underwater behaviours based on the conceptual framework of previous works in the literature. The questionnaire data for this study were collected at four of the most popular dive sites among the marine protected areas in Hong Kong, with 398 valid samples after eliminating incomplete questionnaires. Regression results demonstrated that divers’ demographic characteristics could significantly predict their responsible underwater behaviour, with age (b = 0.10, p < 0.05) and education (b = 0.15, p < 0.05) being found to be positively associated with their diving behaviour. In addition, path analysis demonstrated that divers’ diving experience and attitude could explain 13.6% and 22.6% of the variance in predicting their responsible diving behaviour, respectively. However, no mediation effect was found on the relationship between diving experience and responsible underwater behaviour relative to diving attitude, given the absence of statistical effects regarding the positive impact of divers’ diving experience on their attitude (β = 0.024, se = 0.022, t = 1.085, p = 0.279). Based on the research findings, theoretical and practical implications were discussed correspondingly, which are believed to be beneficial in promoting marine conservation and the sustainable development of marine-based nature tourism in Hong Kong. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Behavioral Economics)
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17 pages, 1857 KiB  
Article
Breaking the Fifth Wall: Two Studies of the Effects of Observing Interpersonal Communication with Content Creators on YouTube
by Ezgi Ulusoy, Brandon Van Der Heide, Siyuan Ma, Kelsey Earle and Adam J. Mason
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 140; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020140 - 16 Feb 2024
Viewed by 788
Abstract
Two studies were conducted to test the convergence of mass and interpersonal media processes and their effects on YouTube. The first study examined the influence of interpersonal interactions on video enjoyment. The results indicated that positive comment valence affected participants’ identification with the [...] Read more.
Two studies were conducted to test the convergence of mass and interpersonal media processes and their effects on YouTube. The first study examined the influence of interpersonal interactions on video enjoyment. The results indicated that positive comment valence affected participants’ identification with the content creator, which then affected enjoyment of the video. To investigate the effects of convergence from a macro-level perspective, the second study tracked and recorded data from 32 YouTube videos for 34 days and recorded the following data for each video: number of views, likes, and comments/responses. The results indicated that the more content creators and users interact, the more likes the video receives. However, user-to-user interactions are associated with a decrease in the number of likes a video receives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Media as Interpersonal and Masspersonal)
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16 pages, 267 KiB  
Article
Users’ Experience of Public Cancer Screening Services: Qualitative Research Findings and Implications for Public Health System
by Maria Florencia González Leone, Anna Rosa Donizzetti, Marcella Bianchi, Daniela Lemmo, Maria Luisa Martino, Maria Francesca Freda and Daniela Caso
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 139; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020139 - 16 Feb 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 803
Abstract
Following the One Health approach, designing multidimensional strategies to orient healthcare in promoting health and preventive processes has become paramount. In particular, in the prevention domain, cancer screening attendance is still unsatisfactory in many populations and requires specific consideration. To this end, following [...] Read more.
Following the One Health approach, designing multidimensional strategies to orient healthcare in promoting health and preventive processes has become paramount. In particular, in the prevention domain, cancer screening attendance is still unsatisfactory in many populations and requires specific consideration. To this end, following a research-intervention logic, this study aims to investigate the experiences and meanings that users of public cancer screening services associate with prevention, particularly participation in the screenings. The experiences of 103 users (96 females; Mage = 54.0; SD = 1.24) of public cancer screening programs in the Campania region (Italy) were collected through interviews. The data collected were analysed following the Grounded Theory Methodology, supported by the software Atlas.ti 8.0. The text material was organised into eight macro-categories: Health and Body; Relationship with Cancer and Diseases; Health Facilities and Health Providers; The Affective Determinants of Cancer Screening Participation; Partners and Children; Physical Sensations and Emotions in the Course of Action; Protective Actions; Promotion and Dissemination. The core category was named Family and Familiarity. Respondents perceived prevention as an act of care for the family and themselves. Our findings support a shift from the idea of taking care of personal health as an individual matter toward considering it as a community issue, according to which resistance to act is overcome for and through the presence of loved ones. The results of this study contribute to a deeper understanding of the perspectives of southern Italian users on participation in cancer screening, and provide important insights to guide future actions to promote these public programmes based primarily on the emerging theme of family and familiarity related to screening programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Behavioural Science in Improving Public Health)
13 pages, 276 KiB  
Article
Effects of Adjunct Questions on L2 Reading Comprehension with Texts of Different Types
by Yunmei Sun, Wenhui Zhou and Shifang Tang
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 138; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020138 - 15 Feb 2024
Viewed by 708
Abstract
Answering text-related questions while reading is a questioning strategy which is called adjunct questions or embedded questions, the benefits of which have been established in first-language reading as to enhance comprehension. The present study aims to study the effects different adjunct questions exert [...] Read more.
Answering text-related questions while reading is a questioning strategy which is called adjunct questions or embedded questions, the benefits of which have been established in first-language reading as to enhance comprehension. The present study aims to study the effects different adjunct questions exert on second-language (L2) readers’ comprehension of texts of various types. One hundred and forty-four intermediate-level Chinese EFL learners participated in this study and were divided randomly into six groups. Each group was given either a narrative or an expository text with ‘what or why’ questions or no questions. A brief topic familiarity questionnaire was attached to the end of each text paper. The results showed that inserted adjunct questions improved the readers’ reading comprehension both in expository and narrative texts, but only narrative texts inserted with why questions had significant effects on the L2 reading comprehension. The findings suggested that text types and question types modulate the effects of inserted adjunct questions on the English reading of intermediate learners. Pedagogical implications and suggestions for future studies are provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Behaviors in Educational Settings)
16 pages, 1129 KiB  
Article
Fear of Sexual Harassment Accusations: A Hidden Barrier to Opposite-Gender Mentoring in Taiwan?
by Thomas R. Tudor, Stephanie D. Gapud and Naeem Bajwa
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 137; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020137 - 15 Feb 2024
Viewed by 644
Abstract
While legal protections against sexual harassment are crucial, their implementation could have unintended consequences. This study explores the potential downside of these protections—fear of false accusations—and its impact on cross-gender mentoring in Taiwanese workplaces. Drawing on social exchange theory, we investigate how fear [...] Read more.
While legal protections against sexual harassment are crucial, their implementation could have unintended consequences. This study explores the potential downside of these protections—fear of false accusations—and its impact on cross-gender mentoring in Taiwanese workplaces. Drawing on social exchange theory, we investigate how fear of accusations might discourage valuable mentoring relationships between men and women. Through an intercept survey, we examined whether these concerns may lead to reduced mentoring opportunities for women, potentially hindering their career advancement. We proposed new constructs and analyzed the model using SmartPLS 4.1. Our findings reveal a complex dynamic: fear of accusations does appear to decrease cross-gender mentoring, raising concerns about its impact on women’s career trajectories. However, the findings also suggest that men support sexual harassment laws, still believing these laws are needed. We discuss our model and its implications; additionally, we emphasize the need for strategies that balance legal protections while also fostering positive mentoring relationships. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Organizational Behaviors)
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15 pages, 855 KiB  
Article
Effects of Embarrassment on Self-Serving Bias and Behavioral Response in the Context of Service Failure
by Kai-Chieh Hu and Hsin-Lin Tsai
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 136; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020136 - 14 Feb 2024
Viewed by 836
Abstract
Previous research has focused on examining embarrassment in sensitive product purchase situations. Although embarrassment is a widespread emotion in consumption situations, few studies have explored its impact on service encounters, especially in the service failure context. This study examines how customers react to [...] Read more.
Previous research has focused on examining embarrassment in sensitive product purchase situations. Although embarrassment is a widespread emotion in consumption situations, few studies have explored its impact on service encounters, especially in the service failure context. This study examines how customers react to different service failures that cause embarrassment and explores whether self-serving bias exists when customers perceive higher embarrassment in service failure. This study uses a 2 (source of failure) × 2 (level of embarrassment) scenario experimental method to examine the effect of two sources of failure on consumer locus attributions, negative emotions, and negative behaviors, considering the moderating effects of the level of embarrassment. Data were collected from 218 student subjects in Taiwan. The results show that embarrassment is important in service failure contexts. Specifically, when consumers perceive higher embarrassment, they attribute more responsibility to the service provider. These attributions, in turn, influence customers’ emotions and behavioral responses. These findings have several important theoretical and practical implications in terms of embarrassing service failures. Full article
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14 pages, 1094 KiB  
Article
Navigating Uncertainty: Teachers’ Insights on Their Preservice Training and Its Influence on Self-Efficacy during the COVID-19 Pandemic
by Yonit Nissim and Eitan Simon
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 135; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020135 - 13 Feb 2024
Viewed by 878
Abstract
This quantitative study investigates teachers’ perceptions of self-efficacy during the COVID-19 pandemic and explores the correlation between these perceptions and the preservice training they received. The research addresses the cognitive connection between teachers’ current self-efficacy, particularly their satisfaction with and appreciation of preservice [...] Read more.
This quantitative study investigates teachers’ perceptions of self-efficacy during the COVID-19 pandemic and explores the correlation between these perceptions and the preservice training they received. The research addresses the cognitive connection between teachers’ current self-efficacy, particularly their satisfaction with and appreciation of preservice lecturers. The connection between self-efficacy and “cognitive connection” lies in the intricate interplay of cognitive processes, observational learning, and the formation of beliefs and perceptions. The way individuals cognitively process information, make connections between experiences, and interpret feedback significantly influences their self-efficacy beliefs and behaviors. Utilizing a retrospective lens, the study reveals a significant correlation between teachers’ evaluation of their preservice training, especially their appreciation of lecturers, and their present self-efficacy. The findings highlight that teachers, amidst the challenges of the pandemic, evaluated their self-efficacy at a remarkably high level. This underscores their resilience during a period of unprecedented uncertainty demanding substantial personal and professional adaptability. The nuanced interplay observed suggests that teachers’ sense of self-efficacy serves as a predictive variable of their mental and professional resilience when confronting uncertainty and navigating rapid and profound changes, as exemplified by the exigencies of the COVID-19 pandemic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Behaviors in Educational Settings)
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19 pages, 496 KiB  
Article
Spiritual Care through the Lens of Portuguese Palliative Care Professionals: A Qualitative Thematic Analysis
by Juliana Matos, Ana Querido and Carlos Laranjeira
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 134; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020134 - 13 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1074
Abstract
Providing spiritual care is paramount to patient-centered care. Despite the growing body of data and its recognized importance in palliative care, spiritual care continues to be the least advanced and most overlooked aspect. This study aims to explore the perceptions and experiences of [...] Read more.
Providing spiritual care is paramount to patient-centered care. Despite the growing body of data and its recognized importance in palliative care, spiritual care continues to be the least advanced and most overlooked aspect. This study aims to explore the perceptions and experiences of spiritual care from the perspective of PC professionals and identify their strategies to address spiritual care issues. Data were collected through semi-structured personal interviews and managed using WebQDA software (Universidade de Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal). All data were analyzed using thematic content analysis, as recommended by Clark and Braun. The study included 15 palliative care professionals with a mean age of 38.51 [SD = 5.71] years. Most participants identified as lacking specific training in spiritual care. Thematic analysis spawned three main themes: (1) spiritual care as key to palliative care, (2) floating between “shadows” and “light” in providing spiritual care, and (3) strategies for competent and spiritual-centered care. Spiritual care was considered challenging by its very nature and given the individual, relational, and organizational constraints lived by professionals working in palliative care. With support from healthcare institutions, spiritual care can and should become a defining feature of the type, nature, and quality of palliative care provision. Care providers should be sensitive to spiritual needs and highly skilled and capable of an in-the-moment approach to respond to these needs. Further research on educating and training in spiritual care competence is a priority. Full article
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16 pages, 540 KiB  
Article
How Distributed Leadership Affects Social and Emotional Competence in Adolescents: The Chain Mediating Role of Student-Centered Instructional Practices and Teacher Self-Efficacy
by Zhenyu Li, Wei Liu and Qiong Li
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 133; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020133 - 13 Feb 2024
Viewed by 956
Abstract
The social and emotional competence of adolescents serves as the cornerstone for their success and future development. This study aims to explore the impact of distributed leadership on the social and emotional competence of adolescents, examining the mediating roles of student-centered teaching practices [...] Read more.
The social and emotional competence of adolescents serves as the cornerstone for their success and future development. This study aims to explore the impact of distributed leadership on the social and emotional competence of adolescents, examining the mediating roles of student-centered teaching practices and teacher self-efficacy. Utilizing survey data from 7246 Chinese adolescents in the SESS project, the study employs a multi-level structural equation modeling approach for data analysis. The results indicate that distributed leadership positively predicts the social and emotional competence of adolescents. Furthermore, distributed leadership exerts indirect effects on adolescents’ social and emotional competence through the independent mediating roles of student-centered teaching practices and teacher self-efficacy, as well as a sequential mediation process involving student-centered teaching practices leading to teacher self-efficacy. This study elucidates how distributed leadership facilitates the development of adolescents’ social and emotional competence, confirming the supportive factors influencing these crucial capacities. Simultaneously, it provides valuable insights into the daily practices of teachers, principals, and administrators. Full article
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17 pages, 711 KiB  
Article
The Domestication of Machismo in Brazil: Motivations, Reflexivity, and Consonance of Religious Male Gender Roles
by H. J. François Dengah II, William W. Dressler and Ana Falcão
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 132; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020132 - 12 Feb 2024
Viewed by 741
Abstract
The relationship between culture and the individual is a central focus of social scientific research. This paper examines motivations that mediate between shared culture norms and individual actions. Inspired by the works of Leon Festinger and Melford Spiro, we posit that social network [...] Read more.
The relationship between culture and the individual is a central focus of social scientific research. This paper examines motivations that mediate between shared culture norms and individual actions. Inspired by the works of Leon Festinger and Melford Spiro, we posit that social network conformation (the perceived adherence of one’s social network with norms) and internalization of cultural norms (incorporation of cultural models with the self-schema) will differentially shape behavior (cultural consonance) depending on the domain and individual characteristics. For the domain of gender roles among Brazilian men, religious affiliation results in different configurations of the individual and culture. Our findings suggest that, due to changing and competing cultural models, religious men are compelled to reflexively “think” about what masculinity means to them, rather than subconsciously conform to social (hegemonic) expectations. This study demonstrates the importance of considering the impetus of culturally informed behaviors and, in doing so, provides a methodological means for measuring and interpreting such motivations, an important factor in the relationship between culture and the individual. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Social Psychology)
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43 pages, 570 KiB  
Review
People with Autism Spectrum Disorder Could Interact More Easily with a Robot than with a Human: Reasons and Limits
by Marion Dubois-Sage, Baptiste Jacquet, Frank Jamet and Jean Baratgin
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 131; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020131 - 12 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1376
Abstract
Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder show deficits in communication and social interaction, as well as repetitive behaviors and restricted interests. Interacting with robots could bring benefits to this population, notably by fostering communication and social interaction. Studies even suggest that people with Autism [...] Read more.
Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder show deficits in communication and social interaction, as well as repetitive behaviors and restricted interests. Interacting with robots could bring benefits to this population, notably by fostering communication and social interaction. Studies even suggest that people with Autism Spectrum Disorder could interact more easily with a robot partner rather than a human partner. We will be looking at the benefits of robots and the reasons put forward to explain these results. The interest regarding robots would mainly be due to three of their characteristics: they can act as motivational tools, and they are simplified agents whose behavior is more predictable than that of a human. Nevertheless, there are still many challenges to be met in specifying the optimum conditions for using robots with individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Full article
16 pages, 235 KiB  
Article
Empowering Movement: Enhancing Young Adults’ Physical Activity through Self-Determination Theory and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy-Based Intervention
by Dalit Lev-Arey, Tomer Gutman and Orr Levental
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 130; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020130 - 10 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1064
Abstract
Objective: This study aims to investigate the effectiveness of a combined Self-Determination Theory (SDT) and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) intervention, the ”Running Minds” program, in promoting physical activity (PA) among young adults. Methods: The intervention, consisting of eight sessions, targeted motivational and [...] Read more.
Objective: This study aims to investigate the effectiveness of a combined Self-Determination Theory (SDT) and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) intervention, the ”Running Minds” program, in promoting physical activity (PA) among young adults. Methods: The intervention, consisting of eight sessions, targeted motivational and psychological barriers to PA. It intertwined SDT’s core components (autonomy, competence, relatedness) with ACT’s emphasis on mindfulness and value-driven actions. This study used a qualitative approach, collecting data through semi-structured interviews with twelve participants aged 20–35, conducted post-intervention. Results: Our reflexive thematic analysis of the interviews revealed five key themes: alignment with personal values, rewarding experience of the sessions, fulfillment of social connectedness, enhancement of both intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and observable behavioral changes. These findings highlight the importance of aligning exercise with personal values and the role of supportive social environments in sustaining PA. Conclusions: The integration of SDT and ACT in the “Running Minds” program appears to be a viable approach for enhancing motivation and adherence to PA among young adults. This study offers valuable insights for future PA interventions, underscoring the need for strategies that consider psychological and social dimensions. Limitations and Future Research: Despite the promising results, limitations include potential recall bias and the short duration of the study. Further research, especially focusing on more diverse groups and employing longitudinal designs, is recommended to broaden and substantiate these findings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional and Cognitive Perspectives in Physical Activity and Sport)
17 pages, 761 KiB  
Article
The Relationship between a Competitive School Climate and School Bullying among Secondary Vocational School Students in China: A Moderated Mediation Model
by Xuzhong Huang, Qianyu Li, Yipu Hao and Ni An
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 129; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020129 - 10 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1064
Abstract
School bullying is widespread in countries around the world and has a continuous negative impact on the physical and mental health of students. However, few studies have explored the influence mechanism of a competitive school climate on school bullying among Chinese secondary vocational [...] Read more.
School bullying is widespread in countries around the world and has a continuous negative impact on the physical and mental health of students. However, few studies have explored the influence mechanism of a competitive school climate on school bullying among Chinese secondary vocational school students. This study aims to explore the relationship between a competitive school climate and bullying in secondary vocational schools in the Chinese context, as well as the mediating role of school belonging and the moderating role of gender. Logit regression analysis and a moderated mediation model were used to analyze 1964 secondary vocational students from China based on PISA 2018 data from Beijing, Shanghai, Zhejiang, and Jiangsu, China. (1) The detection rate of school bullying in secondary vocational schools in China is 17.8%, lower than the world average. (2) A competitive school climate is significantly and positively correlated with secondary vocational school students’ exposure to school bullying. (3) A moderated mediation model suggests that school belonging is an important mechanism by which a competitive school climate influences the occurrence of school bullying, whereas gender moderates the direct effect of a competitive school climate and the indirect effect of school belonging, which mitigates the negative effects of a competitive school climate to some extent. The research results show that creating a healthy competitive climate in schools, cultivating students’ sense of belonging, and facing up to gender differences are helpful to prevent school bullying in secondary vocational schools. Full article
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22 pages, 1662 KiB  
Article
Analysis of Pharmaceutical Companies’ Social Media Activity during the COVID-19 Pandemic and Its Impact on the Public
by Sotirios Gyftopoulos, George Drosatos, Giuseppe Fico, Leandro Pecchia and Eleni Kaldoudi
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 128; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020128 - 09 Feb 2024
Viewed by 970
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic, a period of great turmoil, was coupled with the emergence of an “infodemic”, a state when the public was bombarded with vast amounts of unverified information from dubious sources that led to a chaotic information landscape. The excessive flow of [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic, a period of great turmoil, was coupled with the emergence of an “infodemic”, a state when the public was bombarded with vast amounts of unverified information from dubious sources that led to a chaotic information landscape. The excessive flow of messages to citizens, combined with the justified fear and uncertainty imposed by the unknown virus, cast a shadow on the credibility of even well-intentioned sources and affected the emotional state of the public. Several studies highlighted the mental toll this environment took on citizens by analyzing their discourse on online social networks (OSNs). In this study, we focus on the activity of prominent pharmaceutical companies on Twitter, currently known as X, as well as the public’s response during the COVID-19 pandemic. Communication between companies and users is examined and compared in two discrete channels, the COVID-19 and the non-COVID-19 channel, based on the content of the posts circulated in them in the period between March 2020 and September 2022, while the emotional profile of the content is outlined through a state-of-the-art emotion analysis model. Our findings indicate significantly increased activity in the COVID-19 channel compared to the non-COVID-19 channel while the predominant emotion in both channels is joy. However, the COVID-19 channel exhibited an upward trend in the circulation of fear by the public. The quotes and replies produced by the users, with a stark presence of negative charge and diffusion indicators, reveal the public’s preference for promoting tweets conveying an emotional charge, such as fear, surprise, and joy. The findings of this research study can inform the development of communication strategies based on emotion-aware messages in future crises. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional Well-Being and Coping Strategies during the COVID-19 Crisis)
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11 pages, 733 KiB  
Article
Quality of Life in Metabolic Syndrome Patients Based on the Risk of Obstructive Sleep Apnea
by Taehui Kim
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 127; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020127 - 09 Feb 2024
Viewed by 760
Abstract
Despite the impact of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) on a sizeable proportion of the global population, the difference in the quality of life (QoL) between a group without risk factors for OSA and a group with risk factors for [...] Read more.
Despite the impact of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) on a sizeable proportion of the global population, the difference in the quality of life (QoL) between a group without risk factors for OSA and a group with risk factors for OSA among individuals with MetS is currently unclear. This study aimed to identify the determinants of QoL in patients with MetS with and without OSA risk factors and to analyze differences between these two groups. Data were extracted from the 2020 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). The Rao–Scott χ2 test was performed to evaluate differences in baseline characteristics based on OSA risk factors. A t-test was performed to evaluate differences in the baseline QoL, and linear regression analysis was performed to identify the effect on the QoL of the two groups. The factors affecting QoL in the low-risk group included age, education level, and depression. The factors affecting QoL in the high-risk group were physical activity and depression. These results suggest that nursing interventions should be devised according to patients’ characteristics to help improve their QoL. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Health Psychology)
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19 pages, 765 KiB  
Article
Beyond the Stereotype of Tolerance: Diversified Milieu and Contextual Difference
by Zhen Yue, Kai Zhao, Shunyu Zhu and Yifan Hu
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 126; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020126 - 09 Feb 2024
Viewed by 786
Abstract
We explore whether there are value preferences of creative workers in addition to tolerance and how these value preferences vary among different occupation categories and countries. We use a dataset of 1968 and 1076 observations in China and the U.S., respectively, from the [...] Read more.
We explore whether there are value preferences of creative workers in addition to tolerance and how these value preferences vary among different occupation categories and countries. We use a dataset of 1968 and 1076 observations in China and the U.S., respectively, from the World Values Survey dataset (2017–2020, wave 7) (WVS 7), with a Structure Equation Modelling (SEM) and Multinomial Logit Model (MLM) at the micro level. The findings reveal that (1) the Chinese sample is more likely to have a balanced preference of tolerance towards migrants, religions, and homosexuality, while the American sample’s preference of tolerance is much more likely to be interpreted as accepting homosexuality only; (2) the American sample also shows preferences towards responsibility, technology, work style, and political actions, while a preference for happiness and political actions is identified in the Chinese sample; and (3) with a higher level of creativity, the difference regarding understanding of tolerance is more likely to be highlighted between China and the U.S. This study provides a quite unconventional perspective for understanding the composition of preferences and, to a certain extent, reconciles the inconsistency between the theoretical advocacy of building up a selected milieu and the reality of creative workers’ blended value mix. Full article
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11 pages, 461 KiB  
Article
The Difficulties in Interpersonal Regulation of Emotions Scale (DIRE): Factor Structure and Measurement Invariance across Gender and Two Chinese Youth Samples
by Yanhua H. Zhao, Lili Wang, Yuan Zhang, Jiahui Niu, Min Liao and Lei Zhang
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 125; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020125 - 08 Feb 2024
Viewed by 740
Abstract
Effective interpersonal emotion regulation (IER) strategies have been found to be meaningful predictors for positive psychological functioning. The Difficulties in Interpersonal Regulation of Emotions Scale (DIRE) is a measure developed to assess maladaptive IER strategies. This study aimed to examine the psychometric properties [...] Read more.
Effective interpersonal emotion regulation (IER) strategies have been found to be meaningful predictors for positive psychological functioning. The Difficulties in Interpersonal Regulation of Emotions Scale (DIRE) is a measure developed to assess maladaptive IER strategies. This study aimed to examine the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of DIRE using two college student samples (Sample 1: n = 296; Sample 2: n = 419). The two-factor structure of DIRE (venting and excessive reassurance-seeking) was confirmed through an exploratory structure equation modeling approach. Our results demonstrated that the Chinese version of DIRE exhibits a similar factor structure (in both samples) as the original DIRE. Measurement invariance across gender and samples was also achieved. Latent mean analyses demonstrated that females more frequently reported excessive reassurance-seeking (in both samples) and venting (in Sample 1) than males. Furthermore, venting and excessive reassurance-seeking were significantly related to intrapersonal emotion regulation and well-being indicators. Although in Chinese culture DIRE performs somewhat differently from the original DIRE, the current findings suggest that DIRE is a reliable and valid scale with which to measure the IER strategies in Chinese culture and the use of this measure in clinical practice may allow for an accurate assessment of emotion regulation deficits in clients from other diverse cultures. Full article
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23 pages, 2796 KiB  
Article
Evaluating the Influence of Musical and Monetary Rewards on Decision Making through Computational Modelling
by Grigory Kopytin, Marina Ivanova, Maria Herrojo Ruiz and Anna Shestakova
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 124; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020124 - 08 Feb 2024
Viewed by 753
Abstract
A central question in behavioural neuroscience is how different rewards modulate learning. While the role of monetary rewards is well-studied in decision-making research, the influence of abstract rewards like music remains poorly understood. This study investigated the dissociable effects of these two reward [...] Read more.
A central question in behavioural neuroscience is how different rewards modulate learning. While the role of monetary rewards is well-studied in decision-making research, the influence of abstract rewards like music remains poorly understood. This study investigated the dissociable effects of these two reward types on decision making. Forty participants completed two decision-making tasks, each characterised by probabilistic associations between stimuli and rewards, with probabilities changing over time to reflect environmental volatility. In each task, choices were reinforced either by monetary outcomes (win/lose) or by the endings of musical melodies (consonant/dissonant). We applied the Hierarchical Gaussian Filter, a validated hierarchical Bayesian framework, to model learning under these two conditions. Bayesian statistics provided evidence for similar learning patterns across both reward types, suggesting individuals’ similar adaptability. However, within the musical task, individual preferences for consonance over dissonance explained some aspects of learning. Specifically, correlation analyses indicated that participants more tolerant of dissonance behaved more stochastically in their belief-to-response mappings and were less likely to choose the response associated with the current prediction for a consonant ending, driven by higher volatility estimates. By contrast, participants averse to dissonance showed increased tonic volatility, leading to larger updates in reward tendency beliefs. Full article
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15 pages, 463 KiB  
Article
Temporal Landmarks and Nostalgic Consumption: The Role of the Need to Belong
by Sigen Song, Min Tian, Qingji Fan and Yi Zhang
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 123; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020123 - 08 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1023
Abstract
This study investigates the influence of temporal landmarks on nostalgic consumption through the mediating role of the need to belong. In particular, the study identifies end landmarks as one of the triggers of landmarks, a phenomenon that has not been studied in the [...] Read more.
This study investigates the influence of temporal landmarks on nostalgic consumption through the mediating role of the need to belong. In particular, the study identifies end landmarks as one of the triggers of landmarks, a phenomenon that has not been studied in the existing nostalgic consumption literature. The research is composed of one pilot study and three experiments to test our research hypotheses. The results show that end temporal landmarks trigger feelings of nostalgia, which leads to nostalgic consumption through the need to belong. This study underscores the mediating role of the need to belong, which plays an important role in leading to nostalgic consumption. Building upon theoretical perspectives on the need to belong, our study enriches the research literature by linking extreme consumer emotional statuses, such as social anxiety, to the consumer need to belong, showing that consumer nostalgic consumption can become a coping strategy that counteracts these negative feelings and helps in regaining connection and supporting social relationship networks. Marketers may use the signs of end temporal landmarks to increase consumers’ nostalgia, which, in turn, will enhance consumers’ need to belong and thus lead to the purchasing and consumption of nostalgic products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Consumer Psychology and Business Applications)
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21 pages, 927 KiB  
Article
A Qualitative Exploration of Postoperative Bariatric Patients’ Psychosocial Support for Long-Term Weight Loss and Psychological Wellbeing
by Natascha Van Zyl, Joanne Lusher and Jane Meyrick
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 122; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020122 - 08 Feb 2024
Viewed by 904
Abstract
Background: There is a paucity of research exploring postoperative psychosocial interventions for bariatric surgery patients exceeding 2 years, and therefore, an interdisciplinary postoperative approach is warranted. This qualitative study explored the psychosocial support that bariatric surgery patients feel they need to sustain long-term [...] Read more.
Background: There is a paucity of research exploring postoperative psychosocial interventions for bariatric surgery patients exceeding 2 years, and therefore, an interdisciplinary postoperative approach is warranted. This qualitative study explored the psychosocial support that bariatric surgery patients feel they need to sustain long-term weight loss and their psychological wellbeing. Methods: Fifteen postoperative patients participated in recorded semi-structured online interviews that were transcribed verbatim and analysed using a reflexive thematic analysis approach. Results: Three themes and six subthemes emerged. Theme 1, Journey to surgery, has two subthemes: Deep roots and Breaking point. Theme 2, The precipice of change, has two sub-themes: Continuity of care and Can’t cut the problem out. Theme 3, Bridging the Gap, has two subthemes: Doing it together and Taking back the reigns. The inconsistencies participants experienced in their pre- and postoperative care led to dissonance, and they felt unprepared for the demands of life postoperatively. Conclusions: Bariatric surgery is a catalyst for physical change, but surgery alone is insufficient to ensure sustained change. Surgical and psychosocial interventions are interdependent rather than mutually exclusive. Patients favour an integrative, personalised, stepped-care approach pre- and postoperatively, with active participation fostering autonomy and access to ongoing support extending into the long-term. Full article
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14 pages, 453 KiB  
Article
A Study on the Impact of Financial Literacy and Digital Capabilities on Entrepreneurial Intention: Mediating Effect of Entrepreneurship
by Gyung-Lan Kang, Cheol-Woo Park and Seung-Hwan Jang
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 121; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020121 - 08 Feb 2024
Viewed by 921
Abstract
In the post-COVID-19 era, the content of work and the necessary skills are rapidly changing due to the digital transformation of the way people work. Entrepreneurial adaptability and digital capability are the most necessary competencies for exploring opportunities and quickly turning them into [...] Read more.
In the post-COVID-19 era, the content of work and the necessary skills are rapidly changing due to the digital transformation of the way people work. Entrepreneurial adaptability and digital capability are the most necessary competencies for exploring opportunities and quickly turning them into a professional career amid a crisis. Financial literacy is also essential for expanding skills in economic and social life. The purpose of this study is to verify the influence of university students’ financial literacy and digital capability on entrepreneurial intention and the mediating effect of entrepreneurship. To this end, a survey was conducted on university students in Busan and Gyeongnam, and a sample of 162 respondents was verified using SPSS 28.0. As a result of the study, it was found that financial literacy had a partially positive effect on entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial intention. Digital capability was found to have a positive effect on entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial intention. It was found that entrepreneurship had a partially positive effect on entrepreneurial intention. It was found that entrepreneurship had a partially positive mediating effect between financial literacy and entrepreneurial intention. It was found that entrepreneurship had a positive mediating effect between digital capability and entrepreneurial intention. As a result of this study, it was confirmed that financial literacy, digital capability, and entrepreneurship are very important competencies for university students to adapt to new trends and promote start-ups in a rapidly changing job environment after COVID-19, suggesting the need for further education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Organizational Behaviors)
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11 pages, 257 KiB  
Article
The Role of Peace Attitudes on Sustainable Behaviors: An Exploratory Study
by Rosa Angela Fabio and Alessandra Croce
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 120; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020120 - 07 Feb 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 896
Abstract
This study delves into the intricate relationship among peace attitudes, personality traits, and sustainable behaviors in a diverse sample of 279 adults from different regions of Italy. Building upon the existing literature, this research affirms the influence of agreeableness, openness, and conscientiousness as [...] Read more.
This study delves into the intricate relationship among peace attitudes, personality traits, and sustainable behaviors in a diverse sample of 279 adults from different regions of Italy. Building upon the existing literature, this research affirms the influence of agreeableness, openness, and conscientiousness as primary personality traits associated with sustainable behaviors. Additionally, this study scrutinizes the unique predictive power of peace attitudes. The Peace Attitude Scale (PAS), the Big Five Questionnaire (BFQ), and the Sustainable Behaviors Scale (SBS) were utilized to evaluate peace attitudes, personality traits, and sustainable behaviors. The analysis reveals that peace attitudes significantly predict sustainable behaviors, accounting for 31% of the variance. This predictability is attributed to intrinsic motivation and value alignment. Importantly, peace attitudes extend beyond environmental concerns to embrace social justice and equity, integral components of sustainability. The findings underscore the unique and substantial contribution of peace attitudes to understanding sustainable behavior. This study not only confirms the role of personality traits but also emphasizes the importance of intrinsic values in propelling pro-environmental actions. Full article
16 pages, 984 KiB  
Article
Connections between Parental Phubbing and Electronic Media Use in Young Children: The Mediating Role of Parent–Child Conflict and Moderating Effect of Child Emotion Regulation
by Xiaocen Liu, Shuliang Geng, Tong Lei, Yan Cheng and Hui Yu
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 119; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020119 - 06 Feb 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1139
Abstract
In this digital age, where parental attention is often diverted by digital engagement, the phenomenon of “parental phubbing,” defined as parents ignoring their children in favor of mobile devices, is scrutinized for its potential impact on child development. This study, utilizing questionnaire data [...] Read more.
In this digital age, where parental attention is often diverted by digital engagement, the phenomenon of “parental phubbing,” defined as parents ignoring their children in favor of mobile devices, is scrutinized for its potential impact on child development. This study, utilizing questionnaire data from 612 parents and Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) with moderated mediation, examines the potential association between parental phubbing and young children’s electronic media use. The findings revealed a correlation between parental phubbing and increased electronic media use in children. Parent–child conflict, informed by instances of parental phubbing, was identified as a partial mediator in this relation. Notably, children’s emotion regulation emerged as a moderating factor, with adept regulation linked to reduced adverse effects of parental phubbing and improved relational harmony. These findings underscore the importance of parental awareness of their digital behaviors and the benefits of fostering robust parent–child relationships and supporting children’s emotional regulation to nurture well-adjusted “digital citizens” in the contemporary media landscape. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Psychiatric, Emotional and Behavioral Disorders)
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4 pages, 175 KiB  
Editorial
The Causes, Counseling, and Prevention Strategies for Maladaptive and Deviant Behaviors in Schools
by Jian-Hong Ye, Mei-Yen Chen and Yu-Feng Wu
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 118; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020118 - 05 Feb 2024
Viewed by 784
Abstract
Governments, organizations, and schools around the world are committed to creating a safe and friendly campus environment to ensure students’ high-quality comprehensive development and to cultivate positive mental and physical health states [...] Full article
13 pages, 595 KiB  
Article
Perceived Parenting Stress Is Related to Cardiac Flexibility in Mothers: Data from the NorBaby Study
by Francesca Parisi, Ragnhild Sørensen Høifødt, Agnes Bohne, Catharina Elisabeth Arfwedson Wang and Gerit Pfuhl
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 117; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020117 - 05 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1102
Abstract
Heart rate variability (HRV) is an indicator of autonomic nervous system activity, and high levels of stress and/or depressive symptoms may reduce HRV. Here, we assessed whether (a) parental stress affected HRV in mothers during the perinatal period and whether this is mediated [...] Read more.
Heart rate variability (HRV) is an indicator of autonomic nervous system activity, and high levels of stress and/or depressive symptoms may reduce HRV. Here, we assessed whether (a) parental stress affected HRV in mothers during the perinatal period and whether this is mediated by bonding and (b) whether antenatal maternal mental states, specifically repetitive negative thinking, depressive symptoms, and pregnancy-related anxiety, have an impact on infant HRV, and lastly, we investigated (c) the relationship between maternal HRV and infant HRV. Data are from the Northern Babies Longitudinal Study (NorBaby). In 111 parent–infant pairs, cardiac data were collected 6 months after birth. In the antenatal period, we used the Pregnancy-Related Anxiety Questionnaire—Revised, the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, and the Perseverative Thinking Questionnaire; in the postnatal period, we used the Parenting Stress Index and the Maternal Postnatal Attachment Scale. Higher levels of perceived parenting stress but not depressive symptoms were associated with lower HRV in mothers (τ = −0.146), and this relationship was not mediated by maternal bonding. Antenatal maternal mental states were not associated with infant HRV. There was no significant correlation between maternal HRV and infant HRV. Our observational data suggest that perceived stress reduces cardiac flexibility. Future studies should measure HRV and parenting stress repeatedly during the perinatal period. Full article
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