Next Article in Journal
Between the Art Canon and the Margins: Historicizing Technology-Reliant Art via Curatorial Practice
Previous Article in Journal
The Aesthetics of Flow and Cut in the Way of Film: Towards Transnational Transfers of East Asian Concepts to Western Film Theory
Open AccessEditorial

Trends and Anti-Trends in Techno-Art Scholarship: The Legacy of the Arts “Machine” Special Issues

1
Centre André Chastel, Sorbonne Université, Galerie Colbert, 2 rue Vivienne, 75002 Paris, France
2
DFK Paris, 45 Rue des Petits-Champs, 75001 Paris, France
3
Department of Computing, Goldsmiths College, University of London, London SE14 6NW, UK
4
Space Machines Corporation, 671 Startouch Dr., Eugene, OR 97405, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Arts 2019, 8(3), 120; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts8030120
Received: 3 September 2019 / Accepted: 11 September 2019 / Published: 16 September 2019
With the goal of casting a spotlight on the posture of the creative community at this crucial moment in human technological history, we present herein a thematic overview of the 23 articles published in the recent Arts Special Issues “The Machine as Art (in the 20th Century)” and “The Machine as Artist (for the 21st Century)”. Surprisingly, several of the themes that had been suggested in our two introductory essays as representing shared and positive points of departure—in particular, (a) the visual arts as a longstanding touchstone of human culture, (b) the visual arts (with the example of John James Audubon) as having a unique ability to rally the public to the environmental cause, and (c) computer and robotic proficiency in the arts as leading to a friendlier artificial intelligence—received less than the expected amount of attention. Instead, it was another of the suggested themes (albeit also of a positive and forward-looking nature) around which our authors coalesced, as expressed in the following phrase: the “vast expansion of the creative sphere” which technology has made possible, or in other words, the idea that technology is not only providing new horizons for the professional artist but is also providing new avenues for the non-professional to discover his or her creative potential. In light, furthermore, of the marked enthusiasm for this theme, we suggest in our conclusion the need for a corresponding expansion of the venues available to both professional and non-professional techno-art practitioners. View Full-Text
Keywords: algorithm; artificial intelligence; computer-generated art; embodiment; emergent phenomenon; environmental crisis; GAN; generative adversarial network; machine art; neural network; techno-art algorithm; artificial intelligence; computer-generated art; embodiment; emergent phenomenon; environmental crisis; GAN; generative adversarial network; machine art; neural network; techno-art
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Bessette, J.; Fol Leymarie, F.; W. Smith, G. Trends and Anti-Trends in Techno-Art Scholarship: The Legacy of the Arts “Machine” Special Issues. Arts 2019, 8, 120.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop