Special Issue "Water-Quality Modeling"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Aquatic Systems—Quality and Contamination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Steven Chapra
Website
Guest Editor
Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts 02155, USA
Interests: water quality modeling; advanced decision support; eutrophication; environmental engineering
Prof. Dr. Luis Alejandro Camacho Botero
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Los Andes University, Bogotá 111711, Colombia
Interests: water quality modeling; environmental hydraulics; advanced decision support

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The field of surface water-quality model started in 1925, with the classic Streeter and Phelps model to simulate dissolved oxygen on the Ohio River. In the almost 100 years since that seminal contribution, the field has expanded to encompass a myriad of pollutants beyond oxygen-demanding wastes. These include plant nutrients, toxic organic compounds, heavy metals, pathogens, as well as emerging contaminants such as human and animal pharmaceuticals, endocrine disrupting compounds, microfibers, plastic waste, personal care products, and nanoparticles. Further, models have been developed and applied for all of the major natural waters and their sediments, including deep rivers, shallow streams, natural lakes, artificial impoundments, tidal rivers, estuaries, and the coastal zones of oceans and large lakes.

This Special Issue brings together emerging approaches, kinetic and computational challenges, and research frontiers related to water-quality modeling, with the ultimate aim of providing direction and concepts to carry the field into its next stages of evolution. Along with addressing new areas, approaches, and emerging pollutants, the Issue is also designed to explore the coupling and integration of water-quality modeling with other facets of the natural aqueous environment, including the biosphere, subsurface, and atmosphere, as well as interfaces with socioeconomic models and systems for decision support. In particular, water quality model frameworks addressing future problems such as climate change and mega-urbanization would be of particular interest.

Prof. Dr. Steven Chapra
Prof. Dr. Luis Alejandro Camacho Botero
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • water quality
  • modeling
  • oxygen
  • eutrophication
  • metals
  • nutrients
  • emerging contaminants
  • decision support

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Modeling Daily and Monthly Water Quality Indicators in a Canal Using a Hybrid Wavelet-Based Support Vector Regression Structure
Water 2020, 12(5), 1476; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12051476 - 21 May 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Accurate prediction of water quality indicators plays an important role in the effective management of water resources. The models which studied limited water quality indicators in natural rivers may give inadequate guidance for managing a canal being used for water diversion. In this [...] Read more.
Accurate prediction of water quality indicators plays an important role in the effective management of water resources. The models which studied limited water quality indicators in natural rivers may give inadequate guidance for managing a canal being used for water diversion. In this study, a hybrid structure (WA-PSO-SVR) based on wavelet analysis (WA) coupled with support vector regression (SVR) and particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithms was developed to model three water quality indicators, chemical oxygen demand determined by KMnO4 (CODMn), ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N), and dissolved oxygen (DO), in water from the Grand Canal from Beijing to Hangzhou. Modeling was independently conducted over daily and monthly time scales. The results demonstrated that the hybrid WA-PSO-SVR model was able to effectively predict non-linear stationary and non-stationary time series and outperformed two other models (PSO-SVR and a standalone SVR), especially for extreme values prediction. Daily predictions were more accurate than monthly predictions, indicating that the hybrid model was more suitable for short-term predictions in this case. It also demonstrated that using the autocorrelation and partial autocorrelation of time series enabled the construction of appropriate models for water quality prediction. The results contribute to water quality monitoring and better management for water diversion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water-Quality Modeling)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
WASP 8: The Next Generation in the 50-year Evolution of USEPA’s Water Quality Model
Water 2020, 12(5), 1398; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12051398 - 14 May 2020
Abstract
The Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (WASP) helps users interpret and predict water quality responses to natural phenomena and manmade pollution for various pollution management decisions. WASP is a dynamic compartment-modeling program for aquatic systems, including both the water column and the underlying [...] Read more.
The Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (WASP) helps users interpret and predict water quality responses to natural phenomena and manmade pollution for various pollution management decisions. WASP is a dynamic compartment-modeling program for aquatic systems, including both the water column and the underlying benthos. WASP allows the user to investigate 1, 2 and 3 dimensional systems and a variety of pollutant types—including both conventional pollutants (e.g., dissolved oxygen, nutrients, phytoplankton, etc.) and toxic materials. WASP has capabilities of linking with hydrodynamic and watershed models which allows for multi-year analyses under varying meteorological and environmental conditions. WASP was originally developed by HydroScience, Inc. in 1970 and was later adapted by the US Environmental Protection Agency’s Large Lakes Research Station (LLRS) for applications to the Great Lakes. The LLRS first publicly released the model in 1981. WASP has undergone continuous development since that time and this year will mark its 50th anniversary. This paper follows the development of WASP from its origin to the latest release of the model in 2020, documenting its evolution and present structure and capabilities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water-Quality Modeling)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

[1] Steven C. Chapra, Luis A. Camacho

SMART WATERS: The next phase of water quality modelling and management in the face of climate change and mega-urbanization: Real-time distributed control

[2] James L. Martin, Timothy Wool

WASP 8.31: The making of EPAs next generation water quality model

[3] Rene A. Camacho, Hugo Rodriguez, Brian Watson

Tittle: Advancing linked hydrodynamic and water quality modeling: Evolution and future of the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC)

[4] Martin T. Auer, Cory P. McDonald, Pengfei Xue and Anika Kuczynski

The need for more refined water quality models when the environmental stakes is high: Modeling phosphorus Cladophora dynamics in the Great Lakes nearshore

[5] Luis A. Camacho, Mario Jiménez, Steven C. Chapra

Solute transport and water quality modelling of mountain rivers

Back to TopTop