Special Issue "Water Quality Management of Inland Waters"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Quality and Contamination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Roohollah Noori
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Environment, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran
Interests: water quality modeling; water quality management; inland waters; hydroinformatics; lake and reservoir management
Prof. Dr. Rabin Bhattarai
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
Interests: water quality; hydrology; soil erosion; sediment transport
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Soroush Abolfathi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Warwick Water Research Group, School of Engineering, The University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
Interests: pollution transport in the aquatic environment; climate change and flooding; nature-based solutions for sustainable water management; microplastics transport

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Anthropogenically driven input of pollution loads into inland waters during the Anthropocene has resulted in profound implications for the socioecological function of these waterbodies, including nutrient cycling, sediments, dissolved oxygen availability, recreational activities, primary production, socioeconomic benefits, navigation, and fishery production. At present, around 750 million tons of effluents and 350 million tons of industrial wastes are discharged into inland waters annually, leading to the loss of more than 30 percent of global biodiversity. Wastewater effluents are projected to grow due to increasing urbanization and industrial activities. Fertilizer use has been projected to double by 2050, leading to an increase of 180% and 150% in nitrogen and phosphorus effluents, respectively. In addition, the use of other chemical compounds and emerging pollutants such as microplastics is expected to increase, and consequently, novel contaminants can be a major concern in inland waters in future.

This situation can be exacerbated by climatic stressors and the changing climate, and more importantly under the status quo management of inland waters. Therefore, this Special Issue aims to highlight the recent cutting-edge findings which can help us with sustainable management of water quality across inland water bodies (both surface and ground waters) to mitigate the undesirable impacts of climate disturbances and, more importantly, human activities. The solutions presented are expected to protect natural and human-made inland waters and downstream built ecosystems at various geographical scales for the benefit of society. We are pleased to welcome research papers, technical notes, perspectives, and review papers that highlight novel achievements on issues that can improve the state of water quality, biodiversity and restoration of inland waters, and understanding of the key underlying processes which govern the behavior of pollution in aquatic domains.

Dr. Roohollah Noori
Dr. Rabin Bhattarai
Dr. Soroush Abolfathi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • water quality
  • climate change
  • inland waters
  • biodiversity
  • environmental assessment
  • water resources engineering
  • pollutant mixing

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Longitudinal Chemical Gradients and the Functional Responses of Nutrients, Organic Matter, and Other Parameters to the Land Use Pattern and Monsoon Intensity
Water 2022, 14(2), 237; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14020237 - 14 Jan 2022
Viewed by 228
Abstract
River water quality degradation is one of the hottest environmental issues worldwide. Therefore, monitoring water quality longitudinally and temporally is crucial for effective water management and contamination control. The main aim of this study was to assess the longitudinal variations in water quality [...] Read more.
River water quality degradation is one of the hottest environmental issues worldwide. Therefore, monitoring water quality longitudinally and temporally is crucial for effective water management and contamination control. The main aim of this study was to assess the longitudinal variations in water quality in the mainstream of the Han River, Korea, from 2015 to 2019. The trophic state classification (TSC), microbial pollution indicator (MPI), and river pollution index (RPI) were calculated to characterize river water quality and revealed more serious pollution toward the downstream zone (Dz) due to agricultural and urban-dominated areas. The biodegradability index (BI) indicated that non-biodegradable organic pollutants are increasing in the water body from the urban and animal wastewater treatment plants. Nutrients, organic matter contents, total suspended solids, ionic factors, and algal chlorophyll were higher in the Dz than in any other zones and were markedly influenced by the summer monsoon. Empirical analysis showed that nutrients and organic matter had positive linear functional relations with agricultural and urban coverage and negative linear relations with forest coverage. The pollutant-transport function suggested that suspended solids act as TP and TN carriers. Regression analysis indicated that TP (R2 = 0.47) has more positive functional relations with algal growth than TN (R2 = 0.22). Our findings suggest that a combination of empirical models and pollution indices might be utilized to assess river water quality and that the resulting information could aid policymakers in managing the Han River. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Quality Management of Inland Waters)
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Article
Prediction of Nitrate and Phosphorus Concentrations Using Machine Learning Algorithms in Watersheds with Different Landuse
Water 2021, 13(21), 3096; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13213096 - 03 Nov 2021
Viewed by 662
Abstract
Rapid industrialization and population growth have elevated the concerns over water quality. Excessive nitrates and phosphates in the water system have an adverse effect on the aquatic ecosystem. In recent years, machine learning (ML) algorithms have been extensively employed to estimate water quality [...] Read more.
Rapid industrialization and population growth have elevated the concerns over water quality. Excessive nitrates and phosphates in the water system have an adverse effect on the aquatic ecosystem. In recent years, machine learning (ML) algorithms have been extensively employed to estimate water quality over traditional methods. In this study, the performance of nine different ML algorithms is evaluated to predict nitrate and phosphorus concentration for five different watersheds with different land-use practices. The land-use distribution affects the model performance for all methods. In urban watersheds, the regular and predictable nature of nitrate concentration from wastewater treatment plants results in more accurate estimates. For the nitrate prediction, ANN outperforms other ML models for the urban and agricultural watersheds, while RT-BO performs well for the forested Grand watershed. For the total phosphorus prediction, ensemble-BO and M-SVM outperform other ML models for the agricultural and forested watershed, while the ANN performs better than other ML models for the urban Cuyahoga watershed. In predicting phosphorus concentration, the model predictability is better for agricultural and forested watersheds. Regarding consistency, Bayesian optimized RT, ensemble, and GPR consistently yielded good performance for all watersheds. The methodology and results outlined in this study will assist policymakers in accurately predicting nitrate and phosphorus concentration which will be instrumental in drafting a proper plan to deal with the problem of water pollution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Quality Management of Inland Waters)
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Article
Hyper-Nutrient Enrichment Status in the Sabalan Lake, Iran
Water 2021, 13(20), 2874; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13202874 - 14 Oct 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 573
Abstract
Lakes/reservoirs are rapidly deteriorating from cultural eutrophication due to anthropogenic factors. In this study, we aimed to (1) explore nutrient levels in the Sabalan dam reservoir (SDR) of northwest Iran, (2) determine the reservoir water fertility using the total phosphorus (TP) based and [...] Read more.
Lakes/reservoirs are rapidly deteriorating from cultural eutrophication due to anthropogenic factors. In this study, we aimed to (1) explore nutrient levels in the Sabalan dam reservoir (SDR) of northwest Iran, (2) determine the reservoir water fertility using the total phosphorus (TP) based and total nitrogen (TN) based Carlson trophic state indices, and (3) specify primary limiting factors for the reservoir eutrophication. Our field observations showed a state of hyper-nutrient enrichment in the SDR. The highest variation of TN in the reservoir water column happened when the reservoir was severely stratified (in August) while the highest variation of TP took place when the thermocline was attenuated with the deepening of the epilimnion (in October). Both TP and TN based trophic indicators classified the SDR as a hypereutrophic lake. TN:TP molar ratio averaged at the epilimnion indicated a P–deficiency in the reservoir during warm months whilst it suggested a co–deficiency of P and N in cold months. Given the hyper-nutrient enrichment state in the reservoir, other drivers such as water residence time (WRT) can also act as the main contributor of eutrophication in the SDR. We found that WRT in the SDR varied from hundreds to thousands of days, which was much longer than that of other reservoirs/lakes with the same and even much greater storage capacity. Therefore, both hyper-nutrient enrichment and WRT mainly controlled eutrophication in the reservoir. Given time consuming and expensive management practices for reducing nutrients in the watershed, changes in the SDR operation are suggested to somewhat recover its hypereutrophic state in the short-term. However, strategic long-term recovery plans are required to reduce the transition of nutrients from the watershed to the SDR. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Quality Management of Inland Waters)
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