Water-Food Nexus: Fish Resources and Lake Ecosystem Vulnerability

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Biodiversity and Functionality of Aquatic Ecosystems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 March 2019) | Viewed by 10357

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Guest Editor
Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences, Center for Global Change and Earth Observations, Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Michigan State University, Okemos, MI, USA
Interests: water-energy-food; agriculture; food security; food systems
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Lakes are at the center of some of the world’s most vulnerable ecosystems, and fish are among their most vulnerable biota.  This is true for both natural lakes and for artificial reservoirs, some of which have been in existence for decades and others of which are appearing as new dams are constructed.  Fish are key components of aquatic food webs, and they also provide important sources of protein for human diets,  but they are very often ignored. This Special Issue considers the full diversity of these issues as they relate to fish in their lake habitats.

Prof. Dr. Steven G. Pueppke
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • fish
  • aquatic ecoystem vulnerability
  • food webs
  • lakes
  • water-energy-food

Published Papers (2 papers)

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24 pages, 4229 KiB  
Review
Irrigation in the Ili River Basin of Central Asia: From Ditches to Dams and Diversion
by Steven G. Pueppke, Qingling Zhang and Sabir T. Nurtazin
Water 2018, 10(11), 1650; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10111650 - 14 Nov 2018
Cited by 31 | Viewed by 7389 | Correction
Abstract
Central Asia’s Ili River is fed by mountain streams that flow down into an isolated and arid basin that today is shared by Kazakhstan and China. Agriculture in the basin is dependent upon irrigation, which was practiced as long ago as the Iron [...] Read more.
Central Asia’s Ili River is fed by mountain streams that flow down into an isolated and arid basin that today is shared by Kazakhstan and China. Agriculture in the basin is dependent upon irrigation, which was practiced as long ago as the Iron Age, when early pastoralists constructed ditches to channel water from streams onto nearby fields. Irrigation had become much more common by the 18th century, when the region was controlled by the Dzungarian Khanate. The khanate was toppled by the Qing Chinese in the 1750s in the first of a series of confrontations that destroyed and then rebuilt the basin’s agricultural economy. The region has since been dominated by a succession of Chinese and Russian (and later Soviet and independent Kazakh) governments, each of which recognized the essential role of irrigated agriculture in maintaining control. Thus every cycle of destruction led to reclamation of new lands, resettlement of farmers and upgrading of infrastructure to expand irrigation. This allowed an impressive diversity of fruits, vegetables and field crops to be grown, especially on loess soils of the more fertile upper basin, where tributaries could be easily tapped by gravity flow. Many of these tributaries were entirely diverted by the 19th century, so that they no longer reached the Ili. Large scale irrigation commenced in the 1960s, when the Soviets built Kapchagai dam and reservoir in the lower part of the basin and installed pumps to raise water from the Ili River onto nearby reclaimed sierozem soils, mostly for cultivation of rice. China later constructed a cluster of small- and medium-sized dams that enabled expansion of agriculture in the upper part of the basin. Many irrigated areas along the lower reaches of the Ili in Kazakhstan have been abandoned, but irrigation in the upper basin continues to expand. Declining soil fertility, salinization, pollution, insufficient inflows and adverse economic conditions currently challenge irrigation across the entire basin. Investments are being made in new technologies as a means to sustain irrigated agriculture in the basin, but it remains to be seen if these strategies will be successful. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water-Food Nexus: Fish Resources and Lake Ecosystem Vulnerability)
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1 pages, 134 KiB  
Correction
Correction: Pueppke, S.G., et al. Irrigation in the Ili River Basin of Central Asia: From Ditches to Dams and Diversion. Water 2018, 10, 1650
by Steven G. Pueppke, Qingling Zhang and Sabir T. Nurtazin
Water 2019, 11(4), 861; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11040861 - 25 Apr 2019
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Abstract
In the published article [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water-Food Nexus: Fish Resources and Lake Ecosystem Vulnerability)
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