Special Issue "Transformation of Dissolved Organic Matter in Aquatic Landscapes"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Aquatic Systems—Quality and Contamination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Thibault Lambert
Website
Guest Editor
University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland
Interests: dissolved organic matter; transport versus transformation; biogeochemistry; fluvial networks; microbial metabolism; aquatic continuum
Dr. Daniel Graeber
Website
Guest Editor
Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ
Interests: human impacts on dissolved organic matter sources, fate, and on fluvial macronutrient processing; fluvial ecosystem ecology; fluvial ecosystem concepts
Dr. Núria Catalán
Website
Guest Editor
1 USGS - Water Mission Area, Boulder, CO, USA;
2 Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et l'Environnement (LSCE), CNRS-UMR 8212, France
Interests: biodegradation; reactivity; degradation models; dissolved organic carbon; land to ocean continuum

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a heterogeneous mixture of organic compounds varying in size and chemical structure that originate from a high diversity of sources, such as soil organic matter, terrestrial and aquatic plants, phytoplankton, bacteria, and fungi. DOM is not only transported in aquatic ecosystems but also subjected to transformation through processes such as flocculation, bio- and photodegradation that interact together and determine the biogeochemical and ecological functioning of aquatic ecosystems from local to global scales. Despite the importance of DOM transformation in the aquatic landscape, major gaps or uncertainties remain on how DOM transformation varies across the aquatic continuum (from headwaters to oceans) as well as regarding the relative importance of external factors versus intrinsic properties of DOM on its fate. This Special Issue welcomes contributions from field, experimental, and modeling studies that address the controls on DOM transformation along spatial and temporal dimensions and help to reshape the thinking of DOM reactivity in aquatic ecosystems.

Dr. Thibault Lambert
Dr. Daniel Graeber
Dr. Núria Catalán
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Dissolved organic matter
  • Degradation
  • Transformation
  • Reactivity
  • Aquatic ecosystems.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Influence of Dissolved Organic Matter Sources on In-Stream Net Dissolved Organic Carbon Uptake in a Mediterranean Stream
Water 2020, 12(6), 1722; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12061722 - 17 Jun 2020
Abstract
Studies exploring how different sources of dissolved organic matter (DOM) influence in-stream dissolved organic carbon (DOC) uptake at the ecosystem scale are scarce in the literature. To fill this knowledge gap, we examined the relationship between DOM sources and in-stream net DOC uptake [...] Read more.
Studies exploring how different sources of dissolved organic matter (DOM) influence in-stream dissolved organic carbon (DOC) uptake at the ecosystem scale are scarce in the literature. To fill this knowledge gap, we examined the relationship between DOM sources and in-stream net DOC uptake (UDOC) in a sub-humid Mediterranean stream. We considered four reach-scale scenarios occurring under natural conditions that differed in predominant DOM sources (groundwater, leaf litter, and/or upstream water). Results showed that groundwater inputs favored in-stream net DOC uptake, while leaf litter inputs promoted in-stream net DOC release. However, there was no clear effect of DOM source mixing on the magnitude of UDOC. Further, the variability in UDOC within and among scenarios was mostly explained by stream DOC concentration, suggesting that DOC availability limits microbial activity in this stream. DOM composition became a controlling factor of UDOC variability only during the leaf litter period, when stream DOC concentration was the highest. Together, these results suggest that the capacity of headwater forested streams to process DOC is closely tied to the availability of different DOM sources and how they vary over time and along the river network. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transformation of Dissolved Organic Matter in Aquatic Landscapes)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Short-Term Effects of Fertilization on Dissolved Organic Matter in Soil Leachate
Water 2020, 12(6), 1617; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12061617 - 05 Jun 2020
Abstract
Besides the importance of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in soil biogeochemical processes, there is still a debate on how agricultural intensification affects the leaching of terrestrial DOM into adjacent aquatic ecosystems. In order to close this linkage, we conducted a short-term (45 day) [...] Read more.
Besides the importance of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in soil biogeochemical processes, there is still a debate on how agricultural intensification affects the leaching of terrestrial DOM into adjacent aquatic ecosystems. In order to close this linkage, we conducted a short-term (45 day) lysimeter experiment with silt loam and sandy loam undisturbed/intact soil cores. Mineral (calcium ammonium nitrate) or organic (pig slurry) fertilizer was applied on the soil surface with a concentration equivalent to 130 kg N ha−1. On average, amounts of leached DOC over 45 days ranged between 20.4 mg (silt loam, mineral fertilizer) and 34.4 mg (sandy loam, organic fertilizer). Both, mineral and organic fertilization of a silt loam reduced concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the leachate and shifted its composition towards a microbial-like signature (BIX) with a higher aromaticity (Fi) and a lower molecular size (E2:E3). However, in sandy loam only mineral fertilization affected organic matter leaching. There, lowered DOC concentrations with a smaller molecular size (E2:E3) could be detected. The overall effect of fertilization on DOC leaching and DOM composition was interrelated with soil texture and limited to first 12 days. Our results highlight the need for management measures, which prevent or reduce fast flow paths leading soil water directly into aquatic systems, such as surface flow, fast subsurface flow, or drainage water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transformation of Dissolved Organic Matter in Aquatic Landscapes)
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