Special Issue "Water Sensitive Urban Design"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Urban Water Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Richard M. Ashley
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Emeritus Professor of Urban Water, Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK
2. Director, EcoFutures Ltd.
3. Adjunct Professor, Lulea Technical University, Lulea, Sweden
Tel. +44 1484 663391
Interests: urban drainage; sustainability; economics; green infrastructure; integrated water management
Mr. Paul Shaffer
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Construction Industry Research and Information Association, London, UK
Tel. +44 (0)20 7549 3300
Interests: sustainable drainage; blue/green infrastructure; integrated water management; local flood risk management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) is a term for the co-management of water and urban spaces. Originating from concepts developed in Australia in the last century, the concepts have been taken up in many parts of the world, albeit in many places using different terminology that is more locally-relevant (Fletcher et al., 2014). From an original focus on co-managing urban runoff to control diffuse pollution of waterways, advances in thinking have moved WSUD into an arena that encompasses all aspects of urban water systems, linked to ecosystem services, spatial urban form, and the provision of multiple benefits via integration of water management. Importantly, new tools are now becoming available to better understand how best to implement WSUD to maximise the multiple benefits to society (e.g., CRCWSC). It is therefore timely to launch this call for articles for a Special Issue of Water on WSUD. Although focused on the original concepts, papers from applications worldwide that set out to illustrate advances in practice, thinking and techniques related to WSUD, including where alternative terminology is used, are welcome. It is intended that the focus should be on water systems in, and for, urban areas: resources, supply, sanitation and stormwater management, and the integration of these with spatial form and planning with the aim of maximisation of the benefits to society as a whole. Papers are requested from the widest range of domains, including social science, economics, hydrology, urban planning, resource management and recovery, ecosystem services, as well as engineering and technology.

References

CRWSC (2018) Cooperative Research Centre for Water Sensitive Cities https://watersensitivecities.org.au/

Tim D. Fletcher, William Shuster, William F. Hunt, Richard Ashley, David Butler, Scott Arthur, Sam Trowsdale, Sylvie Barraud, Annette Semadeni-Davies, Jean-Luc Bertrand-Krajewski, Peter Steen Mikkelsen, Gilles Rivard, Mathias Uhl, Danielle Dagenais & Maria Viklander (2014): SUDS, LID, BMPs, WSUD and more – The evolution and application of terminology surrounding urban drainage. Urban Water Journal, DOI: 10.1080/1573062X.2014.916314

Prof. Richard M. Ashley
Mr. Paul Shaffer
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Water Sensitive Urban Design
  • Urban Planning
  • Integrated water management
  • Blue-green infrastructure
  • multiple benefits

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
A Novel Approach for Delineation of Homogeneous Rainfall Regions for Water Sensitive Urban Design—A Case Study in Southeast Queensland
Water 2019, 11(3), 570; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11030570 - 19 Mar 2019
Abstract
The delineation of homogeneous regions is primarily based on long-term overall rainfall characteristics and therefore does not necessarily consider the homogeneity of event-based rainfall characteristics. However, event-based rainfall characteristics including antecedent dry days, rainfall intensity, total rainfall and total duration of rainfall events [...] Read more.
The delineation of homogeneous regions is primarily based on long-term overall rainfall characteristics and therefore does not necessarily consider the homogeneity of event-based rainfall characteristics. However, event-based rainfall characteristics including antecedent dry days, rainfall intensity, total rainfall and total duration of rainfall events are critical for Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD). Accordingly, this study presents a novel approach to objectively identify homogeneous rainfall regions based on event-based rainfall characteristics. This approach uses cluster analysis and Hosking–Wallis heterogeneous tests collectively to test the homogeneity of event-based rainfall characteristics. A case study conducted for southeast Queensland (SEQ), Australia is also presented in this article. This study compares the results of the novel modified approach against results of the conventional approach for the delineation of homogeneous regions. It was evident from the results that the entire SEQ could be treated as a homogeneous rainfall region based on the conventional approach. In contrast, based on the modified approach, the coast and the inland of SEQ were identified as separate homogeneous regions. Further, antecedent dry days and rainfall intensity were recognized as the deciding rainfall characteristics in the delineation of homogeneous rainfall regions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Sensitive Urban Design)
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Open AccessArticle
Evaluation of Design Flow Rate of Water Supply Systems with Low Flow Showering Appliances
Water 2019, 11(1), 100; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11010100 - 09 Jan 2019
Abstract
The installation of water efficient appliances is an efficient demand-side water management measure favored by policymakers and water providers nowadays. The adoption of low flow showerheads in large and complex plumbing systems will not only contribute to a great reduction of shower water [...] Read more.
The installation of water efficient appliances is an efficient demand-side water management measure favored by policymakers and water providers nowadays. The adoption of low flow showerheads in large and complex plumbing systems will not only contribute to a great reduction of shower water use in the whole water system, but also further influence the water supply system design. Hence, it is necessary to justify the redesign of existing water supply systems (such as the pipe size, storage tank volume, pumping arrangement etc.) in terms of the use of low flow showerheads. This study uses Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate the design flow rate for a typical high-rise roof tank water supply system in Hong Kong with the installation of low flow showerheads. The simulation results indicate that a full installation of low flow showerheads can decrease the design flow rate by 15%, corresponding to an energy efficiency improvement of 1.5%. The potential for water savings and associated energy savings can be significantly higher when all installed appliances in homes are water efficient (e.g., showerheads, water taps, washing machines). Further work is required to evaluate the redesign of existing water supply systems for a sustainable future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Sensitive Urban Design)
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Open AccessArticle
Sensitivity of Model-Based Water Balance to Low Impact Development Parameters
Water 2018, 10(12), 1838; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10121838 - 12 Dec 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Low impact development (LID) strategies aim to mitigate the adverse impacts of urbanization, like the increase of runoff and the decrease of evapotranspiration. Hydrological simulation is a reasonable option to evaluate the LID performance with respect to the complete water balance. The sensitivity [...] Read more.
Low impact development (LID) strategies aim to mitigate the adverse impacts of urbanization, like the increase of runoff and the decrease of evapotranspiration. Hydrological simulation is a reasonable option to evaluate the LID performance with respect to the complete water balance. The sensitivity of water balance components to LID parameters is important for the modeling and planning process of LIDs. This contribution presents the results of a global sensitivity analysis of model-based water balance components (runoff volume, evapotranspiration, groundwater recharge/storage change) using the US Environmental Protection Agency Storm Water Management Model to the parameters (e.g., soil thickness, porosity) of a green roof, an infiltration trench, and a bio-retention cell. All results are based on long-term simulations. The water balance and sensitivity analyses are evaluated for the long-term as well as single storm events. The identification of non-influential and most influential LID parameters for the water balance components is the main outcome of this work. Additionally, the influence of the storm event characteristics precipitation depth and antecedent dry period on the sensitivity of water balance components to LID parameters is shown. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Sensitive Urban Design)
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Open AccessArticle
Configuring Green Infrastructure for Urban Runoff and Pollutant Reduction Using an Optimal Number of Units
Water 2018, 10(11), 1528; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10111528 - 26 Oct 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Green infrastructure (GI) has been regarded as an effective intervention for urban runoff reduction. Despite the growing interest in GI, the technical knowledge that is needed to demonstrate their advantages, cost, and performance in reducing runoff and pollutants is still under research. The [...] Read more.
Green infrastructure (GI) has been regarded as an effective intervention for urban runoff reduction. Despite the growing interest in GI, the technical knowledge that is needed to demonstrate their advantages, cost, and performance in reducing runoff and pollutants is still under research. The present paper describes a framework that aims to obtain the optimal configuration of GI (i.e., the optimal number of units distributed within the catchment) for urban runoff reduction. The research includes an assessment of the performance of GI measures dealing with pollution load, peak runoff, and flood volume reduction. The methodological framework developed includes: (1) data input, (2) GI selection and placement, (3) hydraulic and water quality modelling, and (4) assessing optimal GI measures. The framework was applied in a highly urbanized catchment in Cali, Colombia. The results suggest that if the type of GI measure and its number of units are taken into account within the optimisation process, it is possible to achieve optimal solutions to reduce the proposed reduction objectives with a lower investment cost. In addition, the results also indicate a pollution load, peak runoff, and flood volume reduction for different return periods of at least 33%, 28%, and 60%, respectively. This approach could assist water managers and their stakeholders to assess the trade-offs between different GI. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Sensitive Urban Design)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
A Comprehensive Review of Low Impact Development Models for Research, Conceptual, Preliminary and Detailed Design Applications
Water 2018, 10(11), 1541; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10111541 - 29 Oct 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
This review compares and evaluates eleven Low Impact Development (LID) models on the basis of: (i) general model features including the model application, the temporal resolution, the spatial data visualization, the method of placing LID within catchments; (ii) hydrological modelling aspects including: the [...] Read more.
This review compares and evaluates eleven Low Impact Development (LID) models on the basis of: (i) general model features including the model application, the temporal resolution, the spatial data visualization, the method of placing LID within catchments; (ii) hydrological modelling aspects including: the type of inbuilt LIDs, water balance model, runoff generation and infiltration; and (iii) hydraulic modelling methods with a focus on the flow routing method. Results show that despite the recent updates of existing LID models, several important features are still missing and need improvement. These features include the ability to model: multi-layer subsurface media, tree canopy and processes associated with vegetation, different spatial scales, snowmelt and runoff calculations. This review provides in-depth insight into existing LID models from a hydrological and hydraulic point of view, which will facilitate in selecting the best-suited model. Recommendations on further studies and LID model development are also presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Sensitive Urban Design)
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