Harmful Algae Control

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Biodiversity and Functionality of Aquatic Ecosystems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 3295

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Beijing Key Laboratory for Source Control Technology of Water Pollution, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083, China
Interests: wastewater treatment; wastewater reuse; microalgal water treatment; water bloom control; environmentally functional materials; environmental toxicity; ecotoxicity
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Due to human activities, the growth and community structure of algae in water may be greatly disturbed. Under the influence of water pollution, hydrodynamics, climate, and other factors, certain harmful algal species may experience explosive growth. Water blooms form in freshwater and red tides in the ocean. The explosive growth in harmful algae may consume a large amount of dissolved oxygen in the water, and even release algal toxins, which can seriously damage the aquatic ecosystem and may even endanger human health. How to effectively prevent and efficiently control harmful algal outbreaks is one of the current hot research topics in the field of water environment prevention. Various physical, chemical, biological, and ecological methods have been developed for harmful algae control, and all of them are contributing to the development of a green and efficient way to control harmful algae.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to highlight some of the latest advances in this noteworthy and perennial topic of harmful algal control. This Special Issue covers basic research on: (1) the causes, processes, and extinction of harmful algal outbreaks, especially potential effects of environmental factors and emerging pollutants, (2) various novel physical, chemical, biological, and ecological methods for harmful algae control that improve on the shortcomings of existing methods and are inherently innovative, and (3) research on the effects and potential mechanisms on the water quality and aquatic organisms in the aquatic environment during the use of various methods mentioned above and, subsequently, over a longer period of time. Laboratory-scale and pilot-scale studies are welcome to submit manuscripts to this Special Issue. The content of this Special Issue is not limited to the areas mentioned above, and any innovative full-length papers, reviews, and review articles that contribute to the efficiency of harmful algal control are welcome. We look forward to receiving submissions for this Special Issue from researchers around the world.

Prof. Dr. Yu Hong
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • water bloom control
  • red tide control
  • emerging pollutants
  • physical methods
  • chemical methods
  • biological methods
  • ecological methods
  • mechanisms of action
  • short-term effects
  • long-term effects

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

15 pages, 3145 KiB  
Article
HPLC-Based Detection of Two Distinct Red Tide Causative Species (Mesodinium rubrum and Margalefidinium polykrikoides) in the South Sea of Korea
by Yejin Kim, Sanghoon Park, Hyo-Keun Jang, Ha-Young Choi, Jae-Hyung Lee, Seung-Won Jung, Wonkook Kim, Sooyoon Koh, Moonho Son, Seok-Nam Kwak, So-Hyun Ahn, Soonmo An and Sang-Heon Lee
Water 2023, 15(17), 3050; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15173050 - 25 Aug 2023
Viewed by 807
Abstract
Various approaches have been applied to red tide monitoring in Korea since reliable information on phytoplankton communities is crucial. In this study, we employed a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method to analyze two types of red tide, Mesodinium rubrum and Margalefidinium polykrikoides (also [...] Read more.
Various approaches have been applied to red tide monitoring in Korea since reliable information on phytoplankton communities is crucial. In this study, we employed a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method to analyze two types of red tide, Mesodinium rubrum and Margalefidinium polykrikoides (also known as Cochlodinium polykrikoides), along the southern coasts of Korea. During the M. rubrum red tide on 8 August 2022, an unusual dominance of cryptophytes was observed, being the most dominant phytoplankton group. A significant positive correlation was found between alloxanthin concentrations, a marker pigment of cryptophytes, and M. rubrum cell numbers (p < 0.01, r = 0.830), indicating that HPLC-derived alloxanthin concentrations can serve as a valuable indicator for identifying red tides caused by M. rubrum and estimating cell numbers. However, it is crucial to consider the temporal dynamics of the prey–predator relationship between cryptophytes and M. rubrum. Further investigation is required to understand the environmental conditions that promote cryptophyte predominance and their role in M. rubrum red tide development. In the second field campaign on 29 August 2022, we observed a significant correlation between the concentration of peridinin, a marker pigment for dinoflagellates, and M. polykrikoides cell numbers (p < 0.01, r = 0.663), suggesting that peridinin can serve as a reliable indicator of M. polykrikoides red tides. In conclusion, HPLC-derived pigments, namely alloxanthin and peridinin, can be used to effectively monitor red tides caused by M. rubrum and M. polykrikoides, respectively. However, to overcome certain methodological limitations of HPLC, future studies should explore additional markers or analytical techniques capable of differentiating M. polykrikoides from other coexisting dinoflagellate species. Furthermore, the broad applicability of our method requires thorough investigation in diverse ecosystems to fully comprehend its scope and limitations. Future research should focus on evaluating the method’s efficacy in different contexts, accounting for the distinct traits of the ecosystems under consideration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Harmful Algae Control)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 2808 KiB  
Article
Fabrication of Magnetic Silica Nanomaterials and Their Effects on Algal Harvesting
by Yuewen Zhang, Peirui Liu and Yu Hong
Water 2023, 15(15), 2823; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15152823 - 04 Aug 2023
Viewed by 822
Abstract
Harmful algal blooms are a global problem in water environments, and their explosive growth endangers the health of aquatic ecosystems. Magnetic nanomaterials for the harvesting of microalgae have received a lot of attention because of their high efficiency, low cost, and ease of [...] Read more.
Harmful algal blooms are a global problem in water environments, and their explosive growth endangers the health of aquatic ecosystems. Magnetic nanomaterials for the harvesting of microalgae have received a lot of attention because of their high efficiency, low cost, and ease of operation. In this study, magnetic mesoporous silica nanomaterials were prepared using Fe3O4 as a carrier and harvesting on Chlorella sp. HQ. It was found that silica coated with magnetic Fe3O4 microspheres has good dispersion. The harvesting of Chlorella sp. HQ via magnetic mesoporous silica could be maintained over a wide pH range (4 to 12). After the removal of organic components from the surface of the material, the magnetic mesoporous silica obtained a better porous structure. The ethanol reflux method was more beneficial than the calcination method in maintaining the stable structure of the material, thus improving the harvesting efficiency of the material for the microalgae Chlorella sp. HQ by a maximum of 17.8% (65.9% to 83.7%). When the molar ratio of active agent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and stabilizer polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was 1: 0.092 at pH 4 and algal concentration of 0.5 g/L, the materials showed the maximum harvesting efficiency of Chlorella sp. HQ was 84.2%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Harmful Algae Control)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 2141 KiB  
Article
Research on the Development and Application of a Deep Learning Model for Effective Management and Response to Harmful Algal Blooms
by Jungwook Kim, Hongtae Kim, Kyunghyun Kim and Jung Min Ahn
Water 2023, 15(12), 2293; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15122293 - 19 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1314
Abstract
Harmful algal blooms (HABs) caused by harmful cyanobacteria adversely impact the water quality in aquatic ecosystems and burden socioecological systems that are based on water utilization. Currently, Korea uses the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code-National Institute of Environmental Research (EFDC-NIER) model to predict algae [...] Read more.
Harmful algal blooms (HABs) caused by harmful cyanobacteria adversely impact the water quality in aquatic ecosystems and burden socioecological systems that are based on water utilization. Currently, Korea uses the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code-National Institute of Environmental Research (EFDC-NIER) model to predict algae conditions and respond to algal blooms through the HAB alert system. This study aimed to establish an additional deep learning model to effectively respond to algal blooms. The prediction model is based on a deep neural network (DNN), which is a type of artificial neural network widely used for HAB prediction. By applying the synthetic minority over-sampling technique (SMOTE) to resolve the imbalance in the data, the DNN model showed improved performance during validation for predicting the number of cyanobacteria cells. The R-squared increased from 0.7 to 0.78, MAE decreased from 0.7 to 0.6, and RMSE decreased from 0.9 to 0.7, indicating an enhancement in the model’s performance. Furthermore, regarding the HAB alert levels, the R-squared increased from 0.18 to 0.79, MAE decreased from 0.2 to 0.1, and RMSE decreased from 0.3 to 0.2, indicating improved performance as well. According to the results, the constructed data-based model reasonably predicted algae conditions in the summer when algal bloom-induced damage occurs and accurately predicted the HAB alert levels for immediate decision-making. The main objective of this study was to develop a new technology for predicting and managing HABs in river environments, aiming for a sustainable future for the aquatic ecosystem. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Harmful Algae Control)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop