Research on Hydraulics of Migration Route of Aquatic Animals

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydraulics and Hydrodynamics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2022) | Viewed by 4093

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, College of Science and Technology, Nihon Universit, Tokyo, Japan
Interests: hydraulics; hydraulic engineering; river engineering; stacked boulders; refuge condition; local flow; flood control; migration route, fish passage; stability of gravel; energy dissipator; drainage function
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For the preservation of aquatic habitats in rivers, the formation of various flows with complex riverbed configurations should be required. While a river with a simple trapezoidal cross-section can be constructed as a channelized river for flood control, it is difficult to maintain its corresponding habitat, including spawning, growing, refuge, etc. For multi-aquatic animals to migrate upstream and downstream, many hydraulic drop structures are obstacles. The fish passage might help the migration route around the drop structure. The migration route in the fish passage should be kept under a wide range of discharges. In normal stages, the flow passing through the fish passage should be oriented to multi-aquatic animals as a migration route. In this Special Issue, research on the hydraulics of the migration route of aquatic animals is requested. In addition, research on the improvement of river environment, new approaches to fish passage, the evaluation of refuge region for aquatic animals, and problems regarding river configuration and drop structure is welcome. Many activities on these topics might help with the preservation of habitat for aquatic animals.

Prof. Dr. Yasuda Youichi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • migration route
  • river configuration
  • refuge region
  • improvement of river
  • river environment
  • fish passage
  • drop structure
  • flood control

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

13 pages, 7703 KiB  
Article
A Novel Roughness and Flow Pattern for Steep Stream-Type Fishways: Preliminary Insights
by Muneyuki Aoki, Masayuki Nitta, Tomoaki Funakoshi and Taisei Sato
Water 2022, 14(16), 2540; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14162540 - 18 Aug 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1160
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to allow fish to move upstream past barriers or difficult sections of passage, even on steep stream-type fishways. Therefore, the authors devised a roughness arrangement to raise the water depth in the fishway and reduce its flow [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to allow fish to move upstream past barriers or difficult sections of passage, even on steep stream-type fishways. Therefore, the authors devised a roughness arrangement to raise the water depth in the fishway and reduce its flow velocity. Roughness was used as a group in the arrangement so as to expect afflux effects. Water depth was raised and the flow velocity was reduced around the roughness groups, which allowed fish to hold position and move upstream. Although rapid flow was locally formed in some spots in the fishway, its area was small, enabling the fish to move upstream sufficiently. The experimental results obtained in this study will be applied as a removable stream-type fishway to small channels, head constructions, and so on where fishways cannot be installed due to management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Hydraulics of Migration Route of Aquatic Animals)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 4420 KiB  
Article
Impacts of Flood Disturbance on the Dynamics of Basin-Scale Swimming Fish Migration in Mountainous Streams
by Morihiro Harada and Shigeya Nagayama
Water 2022, 14(4), 538; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14040538 - 12 Feb 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2404
Abstract
This study investigated the response of sweetfish (Plecoglossus altivelis), a species that migrates dynamically throughout a river basin, to two flood events during the summer of 2020 in the Nagara River, located in the central region of Japan. By combining multiple [...] Read more.
This study investigated the response of sweetfish (Plecoglossus altivelis), a species that migrates dynamically throughout a river basin, to two flood events during the summer of 2020 in the Nagara River, located in the central region of Japan. By combining multiple environmental DNA (eDNA) surveys and hydrological modeling, the spatiotemporal distribution of P. altivelis throughout a mountainous river basin was captured and analyzed. The eDNA concentrations at 42 sites in the Nagara River Basin were analyzed five times from August to early October 2020. In addition, Rainfall–Runoff–Inundation model calculations were performed using 1-km resolution precipitation data as input values to analyze the magnitude of the flood disturbance at the eDNA sites. The daily specific discharge Qs (m3/s/km2) was employed as an index of the flood magnitude. The calculation period included Flood Events 1 and 2 with 52 and 38 days of precipitation reaching 1923 and 528 mm, respectively. The results of the eDNA analysis showed that, immediately after Flood Event 1, the spatial distribution of P. altivelis was unevenly distributed in the upper reaches of the Nagara River and some of its tributaries. Subsequently, the distribution expanded to the entire mainstem. The distribution of the maximum daily specific discharge suggested that the river segments with high eDNA concentrations of P. altivelis immediately after the high-magnitude flood event were those with a relatively low intensity of flood disturbance compared with those in the other connected river segments and tributaries. The results of this study indicate that the resilience of riverine communities to extreme floods is supported by the continuity and connectivity between the mainstem and its tributaries in mountainous river basins. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Hydraulics of Migration Route of Aquatic Animals)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop