Special Issue "Groundwater and Contaminant Transport"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Aquatic Systems—Quality and Contamination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Lucila Candela
Website
Guest Editor
IMDEA- Water, Spain
Interests: water resources; groundwater; pollution
Dr. Iñaki Vadillo
Website
Guest Editor
University of Málaga-Group of Hydrogeology, Spain
Interests: Groundwater pollution, hydrogeochemistry, stable isotopes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Combating groundwater pollution and addressing the need for good and safe water quality is a fundamental requirement, and better protection against contamination is a major driver of research efforts. During the last decades, the evidence on the prevailing contaminants present in subsurface water has been driven by research advances in the field of contaminant hydrology at the field and laboratory scale, including research into mass transport, monitoring tools, testing methods or even treatment technologies for specific contaminants. The study of contaminant hydrogeology in the current era is not only facing the appearance of new compounds (emerging micro-contaminants including plastics, nanoparticles and/or antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs)), but also the concentration of sources in urban environments that require multidisciplinary and new study techniques. Well-known and new contaminants need to be studied from different perspectives, including targeted basic research on contaminant transport of different compounds and at different scales (from the laboratory to the field); the development of monitoring systems and indicators for new contaminants; the parameters governing pollutant (and multipollutant) transport in soil and aquifer systems; the input of different scientific disciplines and tools to understand pollutant behavior; quantifying transport processes; data acquisition; numerical simulations of pollutant transport; and the analysis of the uncertainty of model results. Case studies focusing on these issues are also welcome.

Dr. Lucila Candela
Dr. Iñaki Vadillo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • groundwater
  • contaminants including emerging
  • transport
  • fate of contaminants
  • monitoring
  • field and laboratory experiments
  • modelling
  • emerging contaminants

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Meteorological Variability and Groundwater Quality: Examples in Different Hydrogeological Settings
Water 2020, 12(5), 1297; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12051297 - 03 May 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Rainfall and temperature variability causes changes in groundwater recharge that can also influence groundwater quality by different processes. The aim of this study is the analysis of the hydrogeochemical variations over time due to meteorological variability in two different study areas in Italy: [...] Read more.
Rainfall and temperature variability causes changes in groundwater recharge that can also influence groundwater quality by different processes. The aim of this study is the analysis of the hydrogeochemical variations over time due to meteorological variability in two different study areas in Italy: an alluvial aquifer in the Piedmont Po plain and an alluvial-pyroclastic aquifer in the Campanian plain. The examined plains show groundwater with natural quality not satisfying the European drinking water standards, or anthropogenic contamination. The peculiar natural quality is due, in the Campanian plain, to the closeness of volcanic areas, and to the presence of reducing conditions. In Piedmont plain a test site is characterized by a point-source contamination by heavy metals, due to the presence of past industrial activities. In all the examined areas there is a diffuse nitrate contamination. The fluctuations of the ions As, F, Fe, Mn, Cr VI, NO3, and Cl were analyzed and compared, using statistical methods, with the variations over time in precipitation, temperature, and piezometric levels, sometimes significant. Results highlight the importance of the groundwater and meteorological monitoring and the key role of the recharge variation in the hydrogeochemical processes. The linking degree between rainfall/temperature variability and hydrogeochemistry is variable, in function of the typology of chemical species, their origin, and of the aquifer characteristics. The fluctuation of climate variables determines sudden changes in the geochemistry of shallow unconfined aquifers (e.g., in the Piedmont plain), while semiconfined or confined aquifers (e.g., in the Volturno-Regi Lagni plain) react with a greater delay to these variations. Moreover, natural quality is more affected by climatic variations than anthropogenic contamination, which is the result of multiple environmental and anthropic factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Groundwater and Contaminant Transport)
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Open AccessArticle
Interplay between Fingering Instabilities and Initial Soil Moisture in Solute Transport through the Vadose Zone
Water 2020, 12(3), 917; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12030917 - 24 Mar 2020
Abstract
Modeling water flow and solute transport in the vadose zone is essential to understanding the fate of soil pollutants and their travel times towards groundwater bodies. It also helps design better irrigation strategies to control solute concentrations and fluxes in semiarid and arid [...] Read more.
Modeling water flow and solute transport in the vadose zone is essential to understanding the fate of soil pollutants and their travel times towards groundwater bodies. It also helps design better irrigation strategies to control solute concentrations and fluxes in semiarid and arid regions. Heterogeneity, soil texture and wetting front instabilities determine the flow patterns and solute transport mechanisms in dry soils. When water is already present in the soil, the flow of an infiltration pulse depends on the spatial distribution of soil water and on its mobility. We present numerical simulations of passive solute transport during unstable infiltration of water into sandy soils that are prone to wetting front instability. We study the impact of the initial soil state, in terms of spatial distribution of water content, on the infiltration of a solute-rich water pulse. We generate random fields of initial moisture content with spatial structure, through multigaussian fields with prescribed correlation lengths. We characterize the patterns of water flow and solute transport, as well as the mass fluxes through the soil column. Our results indicate a strong interplay between preferential flow and channeling due to fingering and the spatial distribution of soil water at the beginning of infiltration. Fingering and initial water saturation fields have a strong effect on solute diffusion and dilution into the ambient water during infiltration, suggesting an effective separation between mobile and inmobile transport domains that are controlled by the preferential flow paths due to fingering. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Groundwater and Contaminant Transport)
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