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Special Issue "Green Infrastructures for Urban Water System: Balance between Cities and Nature"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Urban Water Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Robert Sitzenfrei

Unit of Environmental Engineering, University of Innsbruck, Austria
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +43 (0) 512 507 62195
Interests: modelling of urban water networks; complex network analysis; transition modelling; Smart Water City
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Manfred Kleidorfer

Unit of Environmental Engineering, University of Innsbruck, Austria
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +43 (0) 512 507 62134
Interests: urban drainage systems, stormwater management, nature based solutions, climate change adaptation, modelling
Guest Editor
Dr. Peter M. Bach

1. Urban Water Management, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science & Technology (Eawag), Dubendorf, Switzerland
2. Civil Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +61 (4) 32 175 283
Interests: water-sensitive urban design; integrated modeling; planning of green infrastructure; stakeholder engagement
Guest Editor
Dr. Taneha Kuzniecow Bacchin

Delta Urbanism, Section of Urban Design, Department of Urbanism, Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +31152781298
Interests: water-sensitive urban design; landscape infrastructure planning and design; complex adaptive systems; performative design for extreme weather and resource scarcity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Urban water systems face severe challenges, such as urbanization, population growth, and climate change. Traditional technical solutions, i.e., pipe-based, grey infrastructure, have a single purpose and are proven unsustainable compared to multipurpose nature-based solutions.

Green Infrastructure encompasses onsite stormwater management practices, which, in contrast to the centralized grey infrastructure, are often decentralized. Technologies such as green roofs and walls, trees, infiltration trenches, wetlands, rainwater harvesting, permeable pavement, etc. exhibit multifunctionality. They are capable of reducing stormwater runoff, retaining stormwater in the landscape, preserving natural water balance, enhancing local climate resilience, and also delivering ecological, social, and community services.

Creating multifunctional, multiple-benefit systems, however, also warrants multidisciplinary approaches involving landscape architects, urban planners, engineers, and beyond to successfully create a balance between cities and nature. This Special Issue aims to bridge this multidisciplinary research gap by collecting recent challenges and opportunities from onsite systems up to the watershed scale.

Prof. Dr. Robert Sitzenfrei
Prof. Dr. Manfred Kleidorfer
Dr. Peter M. Bach
Dr. Taneha Kuzniecow Bacchin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Integrated, multidisciplinary approaches
  • Pollution control, water quantity vs. quality
  • Operation and maintenance
  • Transitions processes and retrofitting
  • Design, optimization, and interaction with centralized system
  • Urban microclimate, climate resilience, sustainability
  • Socioeconomics, policy
  • Ecosystem services, environmental benefits
  • Smart green infrastructure
  • Life cycle assessment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Geographic Object Based Image Analysis of WorldView-3 Imagery for Urban Hydrologic Modelling at the Catchment Scale
Water 2019, 11(6), 1133; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11061133
Received: 28 March 2019 / Revised: 20 May 2019 / Accepted: 21 May 2019 / Published: 30 May 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (7802 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
China’s Sponge City initiative will involve widespread installation of new stormwater infrastructure including green roofs, permeable pavements and rain gardens in at least 30 cities. Hydrologic modelling can support the planning of Sponge Cities at the catchment scale, however, highly detailed spatial data [...] Read more.
China’s Sponge City initiative will involve widespread installation of new stormwater infrastructure including green roofs, permeable pavements and rain gardens in at least 30 cities. Hydrologic modelling can support the planning of Sponge Cities at the catchment scale, however, highly detailed spatial data for model input can be challenging to compile from the various authorities, or, if available, may not be sufficiently detailed or updated. Remote sensing methods show great promise for mitigating this challenge due to their ability to efficiently classify satellite images into categories relevant to a specific application. In this study Geographic Object Based Image Analysis (GEOBIA) was applied to WorldView-3 satellite imagery (2017) to create a detailed land cover map of an urban catchment area in Beijing. While land cover classification results based on a Bayesian machine learning classifier alone provided an overall land cover classification accuracy of 63%, the subsequent inclusion of a series of refining rules in combination with supplementary data (including elevation and parcel delineations), yielded the significantly improved overall accuracy of 76%. Results of the land cover classification highlight the limitations of automated classification based on satellite imagery alone and the value of supplementary data and additional rules to refine classification results. Catchment scale hydrologic modelling based on the generated land cover results indicated that 61 to 82% of rainfall volume could be captured for a range of 24 h design storms under varying degrees of Sponge City implementation. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Stormwater Retention and Reuse at the Residential Plot Level—Green Roof Experiment and Water Balance Computations for Long-Term Use in Cyprus
Water 2019, 11(5), 1055; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11051055
Received: 26 April 2019 / Revised: 16 May 2019 / Accepted: 17 May 2019 / Published: 21 May 2019
PDF Full-text (888 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Green roofs can provide various benefits to urban areas, including stormwater retention. However, semi-arid regions are a challenging environment for green roofs as long dry weather periods are met with short but intense rainfall events. This requires green roofs to retain maximum volumes [...] Read more.
Green roofs can provide various benefits to urban areas, including stormwater retention. However, semi-arid regions are a challenging environment for green roofs as long dry weather periods are met with short but intense rainfall events. This requires green roofs to retain maximum volumes of stormwater, while being tolerant to minimal irrigation supplies. The objectives of this study are (i) to quantify the stormwater retention of two substrate mixtures with two plant species under natural rainfall; (ii) to assess the performance of two plant species under two levels of deficit irrigation; and (iii) to compute stormwater runoff reduction and reuse by green roofs and rooftop water harvesting systems for three standard residential plot types in urban Nicosia, Cyprus. A rooftop experiment was carried out between February 2016 and April 2017 and results were used to compute long-term performance. Average stormwater retention of the 16 test beds was 77% of the 371-mm rainfall. A survival rate of 88% was recorded for Euphorbia veneris and 20% for Frankenia laevis, for a 30% evapotranspiration irrigation treatment. A combination of a green roof, rainwater harvesting system and 20-m3 tank for irrigation and indoor greywater use reduced stormwater runoff by 47–53%, for the 30-year water balance computations. Full article
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Figure 1

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