Hydrodynamics and Sediment Transport in Ocean Engineering

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydraulics and Hydrodynamics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 3968

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Civil Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China
Interests: ocean hydrodynamics; sediment transport; ocean engineering; local scour; seabed evolution; renewable energy
School of Engineering, Design and Built Environment, Western Sydney University, Penrith, NSW, Australia
Interests: fluid–structure interaction; local scour of subsea structures; wave energy; fundamental fluid mechanics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

To accommodate our ever-increasing energy needs, the exploration of oil and natural gas is marching toward the deep sea, and tremendous efforts have been made toward developing viable renewable energy sources from the ocean. It is utterly important and challenging to guarantee the safety of offshore structures constructed in the ocean for the purpose of extracting resources and energy. Ocean hydrodynamics, such as waves, tidal currents, tropical storms, and even internal waves, have different characteristics and may result in variable kinds of failure in offshore structures. The sediment transport on the seabed due to the long actions of ocean hydrodynamics can also change the seabed morphology, such as the local scour, the large-scale seabed evolution, etc., which may have significant influences on the stability of offshore structures. This Special Issue aims to collect articles that highlight the research on hydrodynamic and sediment transport in ocean engineering through variable methods, including theoretical analyses, numerical simulations, and experiments. It covers a variety of topics including but not limited to waves and tidal currents; internal waves; submarine pipelines/cables; flow/wave–structure interactions; local scour/seabed evolution; and renewable energy. Papers that report new research methods, fundamental fluid mechanics, or applied research outcomes in relevant areas are welcome.

Dr. Zhipeng Zang
Dr. Ming Zhao
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • waves and tidal current
  • internal waves
  • submarine pipelines/cables
  • flow/wave–structure interactions
  • local scour/seabed evolution
  • renewable energy

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

26 pages, 7918 KiB  
Article
Mitigating Scour at Bridge Abutments: An Experimental Investigation of Waste Material as an Eco-Friendly Solution
by Nadir Murtaza, Zaka Ullah Khan, Khaled Mohamed Khedher, Rana Adnan Amir, Diyar Khan, Mohamed Abdelaziz Salem and Saleh Alsulamy
Water 2023, 15(21), 3798; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15213798 - 30 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1593
Abstract
Scouring around bridge abutments is a crucial and complex process that sometimes may lead to the failure of the bridge abutment. Therefore, in the present research, scouring around bridge abutments under clear water conditions was examined without and with countermeasures for providing an [...] Read more.
Scouring around bridge abutments is a crucial and complex process that sometimes may lead to the failure of the bridge abutment. Therefore, in the present research, scouring around bridge abutments under clear water conditions was examined without and with countermeasures for providing an economical solution. A total of forty-five experiments were performed under clear water conditions to find the maximum scour depth around the bridge abutment. Experiments were performed in two different phases. In the first phase, scour depth was investigated without any countermeasures. In the second phase, scour depth was investigated using marble and brick waste as a countermeasure. The results showed that the maximum scour depth around the bridge abutment (at a distance of 10 cm on the upstream side and 15 cm on the downstream side of the abutment) for the Froude’s number of 0.22 was 0.137 m without any countermeasure. The scouring depth increased up to 40% with an increase in the Froude’s number from 0.13 to 0.22. The maximum reduction of scour depth was observed to be 40% and 55% when brick and marble waste were used as a countermeasure, respectively, compared to without a countermeasure case. It was concluded that marble and brick waste not only reduced scour depth to a significant level but also provided an economical solution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrodynamics and Sediment Transport in Ocean Engineering)
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 5704 KiB  
Article
Experimental Study on the Hydrodynamic Characteristics of a Fixed Comb-Type Floating Breakwater
by Zi Wang, Zhuo Fang, Zhipeng Zang and Jinfeng Zhang
Water 2023, 15(15), 2689; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15152689 - 25 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 890
Abstract
A comb-type floating breakwater is a new wave dissipation structure with particular force and dissipation performance advantages due to the two wave-reflecting surfaces. In this article, physical model experiments are used to study the hydrodynamic characteristics of a fixed floating comb breakwater and [...] Read more.
A comb-type floating breakwater is a new wave dissipation structure with particular force and dissipation performance advantages due to the two wave-reflecting surfaces. In this article, physical model experiments are used to study the hydrodynamic characteristics of a fixed floating comb breakwater and two structural optimization-based measures under the combined action of regular waves, irregular waves, and wave currents. The effects of factors such as the relative width, relative wave height, water flow velocity, and irregular waves on the transmission coefficient of the breakwater are analyzed. In addition, the characteristics of the transmission wave waveform are analyzed based on the time and frequency domains. The results show that (1) the wave transmission coefficient of a comb-type floating breakwater is lower than that of a rectangular floating box for long-period waves, while the transmission coefficient is larger than that of a rectangular floating box for short-period waves. (2) Under combined current and waves, the superimposition of bidirectional currents can increase the transmission coefficient, and the transmission coefficient increases with increasing current speed. The superimposition of the anti-directional current can decrease the transmission coefficient. (3) Moreover, with the same wave parameters, the transmission coefficient for irregular waves is larger than that of regular waves. (4) Finally, extending the bottom plate and adding lower baffles can effectively enhance the wave dissipation effect of the comb-type floating breakwater while also stabilizing the transmitted wave waveform. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrodynamics and Sediment Transport in Ocean Engineering)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 7950 KiB  
Article
Numerical Simulation of Tidal Current and Sediment Movement in the Sea Area near Weifang Port
by Jiarui Qi, Yige Jing, Chao Chen and Jinfeng Zhang
Water 2023, 15(14), 2516; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15142516 - 09 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1089
Abstract
This paper uses the finite-volume community ocean model (FVCOM) coupled with the simulating waves nearshore (SWAN) in a wave–current–sediment model to simulate the tidal current field, wave field, and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) field in the sea area near Weifang Port, China. The [...] Read more.
This paper uses the finite-volume community ocean model (FVCOM) coupled with the simulating waves nearshore (SWAN) in a wave–current–sediment model to simulate the tidal current field, wave field, and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) field in the sea area near Weifang Port, China. The three-dimensional water-and-sediment model was modified by introducing a sediment-settling-velocity formula that considers the effect of gradation. Next, the SSCs calculated by the original and modified models were compared with the measured data. The SSCs calculated by the modified model were closer to the measured data, as evidenced by the smaller mean relative error and root-mean-square error. The results show that the modified coupled wave–current–sediment model can reasonably describe the hydrodynamic characteristics and sediment movement in the sea area near Weifang Port, and the nearshore SSCs calculated by the modified model were higher than those calculated by the original model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrodynamics and Sediment Transport in Ocean Engineering)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop