Special Issue "Challenges and Advances in Bee Health and Diseases"

A special issue of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Giovanni Cilia
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CREA Research Centre for Agriculture and Environment, 40128 Bologna, Italy
Interests: honeybee; pathogens; microbiology; molecular biology; antimicrobials; bacterial infectious disease; zoonosis; antimicrobial resistance; nosemosis; bee viral disease; bee health
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Antonio Nanetti
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CREA Research Centre for Agriculture and Environment, 00198 Roma, Italy
Interests: honeybee; nosemosis; bee health
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Following the great participation that the Special Issue “Honey Bee Health” saw, we have decided to launch another issue on this topic. This new invitation extends beyond honeybees, including also wild and solitary bees.

Honeybee diseases are continuously studied by researchers to investigate their relationship with host/parasites. Diseases are caused by several types of pathogens: bacteria, such as Melissococcus plutonius and Paenibacillus larvae; microsporidia, such as Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae; fungi, such as Ascosphaera apis; trypanosomatids, such as Crithidia mellificae, Lotmaria passim, and Crithidia bombi; mites, such as Varroa destructor; predatory wasps, including Vespa velutina; and invasive beetle, such as Aethina tumida, all of which are of great veterinary interest.

All these pathogens may be able to infect not only other bees, such as Bombus spp., Osmia spp., Megachiles spp., etc, but also invasive species that could be vectors for the honeybee population—not only Varroa destructor, which represents the mainly virus transmission route, but also Aethina tumida and Vespa velutina, which can be infected by a wide range of bee pathogens, but whose roles in epidemiology remain unclear.

Recently, host–pathogen interactions for bee health have been included in a multifactorial approach, involving a dynamic balance among a range of threats and resources interacting at multiple levels of scale.

The aim of this Special Issue is to explore bee health through a series of research articles focused on different aspects of bee health, including Apis mellifera but also other wild bee species, at different levels of organization, including molecular health, microbial health, population genetic health, and interaction with invasive species that live in close contact with the bee population.

Dr. Giovanni Cilia
Dr. Antonio Nanetti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Veterinary Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bee pathogens
  • Apis mellifiera
  • bee health
  • wild bees
  • Apoidei
  • honeybee–wild bee spillover
  • spillover
  • host–pathogen interaction
  • invasive pest
  • bee bacteria
  • bee virus
  • microsporidia
  • Melissococcus plutonius
  • Paenibacillus larvae
  • Nosema apis
  • Nosema ceranae
  • Ascosphaera apis
  • Aspegillus spp.
  • Lotmaria passim
  • Crithidia bombi
  • Crithidia mellificae
  • acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV)
  • chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV)
  • Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV)
  • black queen cell virus (BQCV)
  • deformed wing virus (DWV)
  • sac brood virus (SBV)
  • Kashmir bee virus (KBV)

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Replicative Deformed Wing Virus Found in the Head of Adults from Symptomatic Commercial Bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) Colonies
Vet. Sci. 2021, 8(7), 117; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci8070117 - 23 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 663
Abstract
The deformed wing virus (DWV) is one of the most common honey bee pathogens. The virus may also be detected in other insect species, including Bombus terrestris adults from wild and managed colonies. In this study, individuals of all stages, castes, and sexes [...] Read more.
The deformed wing virus (DWV) is one of the most common honey bee pathogens. The virus may also be detected in other insect species, including Bombus terrestris adults from wild and managed colonies. In this study, individuals of all stages, castes, and sexes were sampled from three commercial colonies exhibiting the presence of deformed workers and analysed for the presence of DWV. Adults (deformed individuals, gynes, workers, males) had their head exscinded from the rest of the body and the two parts were analysed separately by RT-PCR. Juvenile stages (pupae, larvae, and eggs) were analysed undissected. All individuals tested positive for replicative DWV, but deformed adults showed a higher number of copies compared to asymptomatic individuals. Moreover, they showed viral infection in their heads. Sequence analysis indicated that the obtained DWV amplicons belonged to a strain isolated in the United Kingdom. Further studies are needed to characterize the specific DWV target organs in the bumblebees. The result of this study indicates the evidence of DWV infection in B. terrestris specimens that could cause wing deformities, suggesting a relationship between the deformities and the virus localization in the head. Further studies are needed to define if a specific organ could be a target in symptomatic bumblebees. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges and Advances in Bee Health and Diseases)
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Article
In Vitro Activity of Several Essential Oils Extracted from Aromatic Plants against Ascosphaera apis
Vet. Sci. 2021, 8(5), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci8050080 - 10 May 2021
Viewed by 1248
Abstract
The use of natural substances such as essentials oils against bee pathogens is of great interest as an alternative to traditional methods based on synthetic compounds like antibiotics and fungicides, in order to minimize the risk of having toxic residues in hive products [...] Read more.
The use of natural substances such as essentials oils against bee pathogens is of great interest as an alternative to traditional methods based on synthetic compounds like antibiotics and fungicides, in order to minimize the risk of having toxic residues in hive products and to prevent the development of resistance phenomena. This study evaluated the inhibitory, fungicidal and sporicidal activity of ten essential oils extracted from aromatic plants against Ascosphaera apis, the etiological agent of chalkbrood, an invasive honey bee mycosis. The most effective essential oils were Thymus herba-barona, Thymus capitatus and Cinnamomum zeylanicum, which showed values of minimum fungicidal concentration and minimum sporicidal concentration ranging from 200 to 400 ppm. Carvacrol was the main component of Thymus capitatus and Thymus herba-barona oils, whereas cinnamic aldehyde prevailed in Cinnamomum zeylanicum oil. Further in-apiary studies will allow the evaluation of side effects on bees and residues in hive products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges and Advances in Bee Health and Diseases)
Article
Bee Health and Productivity in Apis mellifera, a Consequence of Multiple Factors
Vet. Sci. 2021, 8(5), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci8050076 - 04 May 2021
Viewed by 1549
Abstract
Managed honeybees play an important role as pollinators. The health and nutritional condition of honeybee colonies (Apis mellifera L.) depends for an important part on management practices, and it is influenced by multiple factors. This study aims to identify the stressors that [...] Read more.
Managed honeybees play an important role as pollinators. The health and nutritional condition of honeybee colonies (Apis mellifera L.) depends for an important part on management practices, and it is influenced by multiple factors. This study aims to identify the stressors that lead to the loss of honeybee health and its consequences on the colony’s productivity. Different aspects related to management practices, productivity, clinical observations related to diseases, presence of sanitary gaps in the apiaries, colony strength, weather and infestation rates by Varroa sp. mites were measured. The information was collected during two monitoring in 53 apiaries in the Province of Santa Fe, Argentina. The results show correlations among many of the management practices, health condition and yield. The most important factors affecting the productivity of the studied honeybee colonies were nuclei preparation, the number of combs in the brood chamber, change of bee queen, disinfection of beekeeping material, among other less significant ones. Although honey production is important in the region, the colony strength was deficient and inadequate during both monitoring. Due to its dependence on management by the beekeeper, it is suggested that a holistic approach could improve bee health, increasing the productivity of honeybees. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges and Advances in Bee Health and Diseases)
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