Microparticles-based Vaccines

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2018) | Viewed by 14240

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Mercer University, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA
Interests: bio-fabrication of microparticulate vaccines for infectious diseases and cancer
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special edition will highlight the triumphs and tribulations of microparticulate vaccine delivery. Particulate vaccines offer several advantages over the traditional vaccines, such as superior vaccine stability, the avoidance of cold-chain requirements, and the ease of manufacture. Further, the overall enhanced immune response due to a combination of factors, such as slow release of antigen from the particles and superior uptake into antigen presenting cells of the immune system, makes particulate vaccines the preferred choice of vaccine delivery. The availability of safe bio-degradable and bio-compatible polymers enhances its suitability for human use. Novel delivery of microparticulate vaccines such as transdermal delivery using microneedles and laser ablation, nasal delivery, buccal delivery, and oral delivery of vaccines, amongst others, will also be discussed. Several examples of successful delivery of particulate vaccines in the areas of cancer and infectious diseases, to name a few will be extensively covered.

Prof. Dr. Martin J. D'Souza
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vaccines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Particulate vaccines
  • cancer vaccines
  • vaccines for infectious diseases

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

17 pages, 3023 KiB  
Article
Novel Whole-Cell Inactivated Neisseria Gonorrhoeae Microparticles as Vaccine Formulation in Microneedle-Based Transdermal Immunization
by Rikhav P. Gala, Rokon Uz Zaman, Martin J. D’Souza and Susu M. Zughaier
Vaccines 2018, 6(3), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines6030060 - 4 Sep 2018
Cited by 49 | Viewed by 6922
Abstract
Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a strict human pathogen responsible for more than 100 million new sexually transmitted infections worldwide each year. Due to the global emergence of antibiotic resistance, the Center for Disease control (CDC) recently listed N. gonorrhoeae as an urgent threat to [...] Read more.
Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a strict human pathogen responsible for more than 100 million new sexually transmitted infections worldwide each year. Due to the global emergence of antibiotic resistance, the Center for Disease control (CDC) recently listed N. gonorrhoeae as an urgent threat to public health. No vaccine is available in spite of the huge disease burden and the possibility of untreatable gonorrhea. The aim of this study is to investigate the immunogenicity of a novel whole-cell-based inactivated gonococcal microparticle vaccine formulation loaded in dissolvable microneedles for transdermal administration. The nanotechnology-based vaccine formulation consists of inactivated whole-cell gonococci strain CDC-F62, spray dried and encapsulated into biodegradable cross-linked albumin matrix with sustained slow antigen release. The dry vaccine nanoparticles were then loaded in a dissolvable microneedle skin patch for transdermal delivery. The efficacy of the whole-cell microparticles vaccine formulation loaded in microneedles was assessed in vitro using dendritic cells and macrophages as well as in vivo mouse model. Antibody titers were measured using an enzyme immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and antigen-specific T lymphocytes were assessed in spleens and lymph nodes. Here we report that whole-cell-based gonococcal microparticle vaccine loaded in dissolvable microneedles for transdermal administration induced significant increase in antigen-specific IgG antibody titers and antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes in mice compared to gonococcal antigens in solution or empty microneedles. Significant increase in antigen-specific IgG antibody levels was observed at the end of week 2 in groups that received the vaccine compared to the group receiving empty nanoparticles. The advantages of using formalin-fixed whole-cell gonococci that all immunogenic epitopes are covered and preserved from degradation. The spherical shaped micro and nanoparticles are biological mimics of gonococci, therefore present to the immune system as invaders but without the ability to suppress adaptive immunity. In conclusion, the transdermal delivery of microparticles vaccine via a microneedle patch was shown to be an effective system for vaccine delivery. The novel gonorrhea nanovaccine is cheap to produce in a stable dry powder and can be delivered in microneedle skin patch obviating the need for needle use or the cold chain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microparticles-based Vaccines)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 5150 KiB  
Communication
Respiratory Tract Deposition and Distribution Pattern of Microparticles in Mice Using Different Pulmonary Delivery Techniques
by Nitesh K. Kunda, Dominique N. Price and Pavan Muttil
Vaccines 2018, 6(3), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines6030041 - 10 Jul 2018
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 6657
Abstract
Pulmonary delivery of drugs and vaccines is an established route of administration, with particulate-based carriers becoming an attractive strategy to enhance the benefits of pulmonary therapeutic delivery. Despite the increasing number of publications using the pulmonary route of delivery, the lack of effective [...] Read more.
Pulmonary delivery of drugs and vaccines is an established route of administration, with particulate-based carriers becoming an attractive strategy to enhance the benefits of pulmonary therapeutic delivery. Despite the increasing number of publications using the pulmonary route of delivery, the lack of effective and uniform administration techniques in preclinical models generally results in poor translational success. In this study, we used the IVIS Spectrum small-animal in vivo imaging system to compare the respiratory tract deposition and distribution pattern of a microsphere suspension (5 µm) in mice after 1, 4, and 24 h when delivered by oropharyngeal aspiration, the Microsprayer® Aerosolizer, and the BioLite Intubation System, three-widely reported preclinical inhalation techniques. We saw no significant differences in microsphere deposition in whole body images and excised lungs (at 1, 4, and 24 h); however, the three-dimensional (3D) images showed more localized deposition in the lungs with the MicroSprayer® and BioLite delivery techniques. Further, oropharyngeal aspiration (at 1 h) showed microsphere deposition in the oral cavity, in contrast to the MicroSprayer® and BioLite systems. The studies shown here will allow researchers to choose the appropriate pulmonary delivery method in animal models based on their study requirements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microparticles-based Vaccines)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop