Virus-Like Particle (VLP) Vaccines against Emerging Infectious Diseases

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X). This special issue belongs to the section "Vaccine Adjuvants".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 5955

Special Issue Editor

Department of Pharmacology, University of Minnesota Twin Cities, Saint Paul, MN 55108, USA
Interests: coronavirus; antibody; crystal structure; viral entry and replication
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Emerging Infectious Diseases (EIDs) have been threatening human and animal health, causing damage to the global economy and the stability of society. Against the background of a growing human population, globalization, and more active human behavior around the world, EIDs have more opportunities to spread from animals to humans and transmit more efficiently among the latter, which may cause epidemics or even pandemics. Since 1940, many EID events have been reported, such as West Nile fever, Lassa fever, Ebola hemorrhagic fever, AIDS, and flu. In particular, coronavirus has shocked the world three times in the past 20 years, with the SARS strain in 2002, MERS in 2012 and COVID-19 since 2019. One of the most important strategies to prevent/treat EIDs is vaccination. Virus-Like Particle (VLP) based vaccines are a novel strategy to develop effective vaccines and show advantages over conventional vaccines. As subunit vaccines, they are safer than some conventional vaccines. VLPs better represent antigens on their surface, have high immunogenicity, and are capable of inducing both strong humoral and cellular immune responses. With their unique characteristics, VLP vaccines will play an important role in combating EIDs in the future. 

This Special Issue welcomes studies (research articles and brief reports) focused on Virus-Like Particle (VLP) vaccines against emerging infectious diseases, including those caused by viruses, bacteria, parasites, and other pathogens from either humans or animals.

Dr. Gang Ye
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vaccines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Emerging Infectious Diseases (EIDs)
  • Virus-Like Particle (VLP)

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

17 pages, 2883 KiB  
Article
Design and Preclinical Evaluation of a Nanoparticle Vaccine against Respiratory Syncytial Virus Based on the Attachment Protein G
by Richard Voorzaat, Freek Cox, Daan van Overveld, Lam Le, Lisanne Tettero, Joost Vaneman, Mark J. G. Bakkers and Johannes P. M. Langedijk
Vaccines 2024, 12(3), 294; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines12030294 - 12 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1396
Abstract
Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) poses a significant human health threat, particularly to infants and the elderly. While efficacious vaccines based on the F protein have recently received market authorization, uncertainties remain regarding the future need for vaccine updates to counteract potential viral [...] Read more.
Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) poses a significant human health threat, particularly to infants and the elderly. While efficacious vaccines based on the F protein have recently received market authorization, uncertainties remain regarding the future need for vaccine updates to counteract potential viral drift. The attachment protein G has long been ignored as a vaccine target due to perceived non-essentiality and ineffective neutralization on immortalized cells. Here, we show strong G-based neutralization in fully differentiated human airway epithelial cell (hAEC) cultures that is comparable to F-based neutralization. Next, we designed an RSV vaccine component based on the central conserved domain (CCD) of G fused to self-assembling lumazine synthase (LS) nanoparticles from the thermophile Aquifex aeolicus as a multivalent antigen presentation scaffold. These nanoparticles, characterized by high particle expression and assembly through the introduction of N-linked glycans, showed exceptional thermal and storage stability and elicited potent RSV neutralizing antibodies in a mouse model. In conclusion, our results emphasize the pivotal role of RSV G in the viral lifecycle and culminate in a promising next-generation RSV vaccine candidate characterized by excellent manufacturability and immunogenic properties. This candidate could function independently or synergistically with current F-based vaccines. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

28 pages, 3220 KiB  
Review
Advances in Poultry Vaccines: Leveraging Biotechnology for Improving Vaccine Development, Stability, and Delivery
by Khaled Abdelaziz, Yosra A. Helmy, Alexander Yitbarek, Douglas C. Hodgins, Tamer A. Sharafeldin and Mohamed S. H. Selim
Vaccines 2024, 12(2), 134; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines12020134 - 28 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 4033
Abstract
With the rapidly increasing demand for poultry products and the current challenges facing the poultry industry, the application of biotechnology to enhance poultry production has gained growing significance. Biotechnology encompasses all forms of technology that can be harnessed to improve poultry health and [...] Read more.
With the rapidly increasing demand for poultry products and the current challenges facing the poultry industry, the application of biotechnology to enhance poultry production has gained growing significance. Biotechnology encompasses all forms of technology that can be harnessed to improve poultry health and production efficiency. Notably, biotechnology-based approaches have fueled rapid advances in biological research, including (a) genetic manipulation in poultry breeding to improve the growth and egg production traits and disease resistance, (b) rapid identification of infectious agents using DNA-based approaches, (c) inclusion of natural and synthetic feed additives to poultry diets to enhance their nutritional value and maximize feed utilization by birds, and (d) production of biological products such as vaccines and various types of immunostimulants to increase the defensive activity of the immune system against pathogenic infection. Indeed, managing both existing and newly emerging infectious diseases presents a challenge for poultry production. However, recent strides in vaccine technology are demonstrating significant promise for disease prevention and control. This review focuses on the evolving applications of biotechnology aimed at enhancing vaccine immunogenicity, efficacy, stability, and delivery. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop