Special Issue "Spatial Epidemiology of Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs)"

A special issue of Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease (ISSN 2414-6366).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Janey Messina

School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3QY, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: health geography; spatial epidemiology of infectious diseases; the application of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and quantitative analysis to public health and social science research questions; Population-environment interactions, particularly in developing countries

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue focuses on recent research on the spatial epidemiology of infectious diseases. This area of research crosses disciplinary boundaries, drawing on expertise in the fields of geography, applied statistics, and public health science. While spatial epidemiological approaches can be applied to many health problems, this issue will specifically explore geographic variations in infectious diseases. This may include both the description and analysis of risk and spread patterns, and range from local to global in scale. In exploring these patterns, studies must consider not only the distribution of infectious disease agents, but also the socioeconomic, behavioural, and demographic aspects of the human populations which they affect and the natural and built environments in which humans and infectious agents interact. Methodologically, studies will take a spatial approach and make use of various computational techniques including Geographic Information Systems (GIS), spatial analysis, disease distribution modelling, and spatial statistical techniques.

Dr. Janey Messina
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • spatial epidemiology
  • infectious diseases
  • NTDs
  • disease ecology
  • vector-borne diseases
  • risk mapping

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Spatial Heterogeneity and Temporal Trends in Malaria on the Thai–Myanmar Border (2012–2017): A Retrospective Observational Study
Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2019, 4(2), 62; https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed4020062
Received: 6 February 2019 / Revised: 25 March 2019 / Accepted: 30 March 2019 / Published: 12 April 2019
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Abstract
Malaria infections remain an important public health problem for the Thai–Myanmar border population, despite a plan for the elimination by the end of 2026 (Thailand) and 2030 (Myanmar). This study aimed to explore spatiotemporal patterns in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax incidence along [...] Read more.
Malaria infections remain an important public health problem for the Thai–Myanmar border population, despite a plan for the elimination by the end of 2026 (Thailand) and 2030 (Myanmar). This study aimed to explore spatiotemporal patterns in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax incidence along the Thai–Myanmar border. Malaria cases among Thai citizens in 161 sub-districts in Thailand’s Kanchanaburi and Tak Provinces (2012–2017) were analyzed to assess the cluster areas and temporal trends. Based on reported incidence, 65.22% and 40.99% of the areas studied were seen to be at elimination levels for P. falciparum and P. vivax already, respectively. There were two clear clusters of malaria in the region: One in the northern part (Cluster I), and the other in the central part (Cluster II). In Cluster I, the malaria season exhibited two peaks, while there was only one peak seen for Cluster II. Malaria incidence decreased at a faster rate in Cluster I, with 5% and 4% reductions compared with 4% and 3% reductions in P. falciparum and P. vivax incidence per month, respectively, in Cluster II. The decreasing trends reflect the achievements of malaria control efforts on both sides of the Thai–Myanmar border. However, these clusters could act as reservoirs. Perhaps one of the main challenges facing elimination programs in this low transmission setting is maintaining a strong system for early diagnosis and treatment, even when malaria cases are very close to zero, whilst preventing re-importation of cases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Spatial Epidemiology of Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs))
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Open AccessArticle Assessing the Presence of Wuchereria bancrofti Infections in Vectors Using Xenomonitoring in Lymphatic Filariasis Endemic Districts in Ghana
Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2019, 4(1), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed4010049
Received: 17 January 2019 / Revised: 10 March 2019 / Accepted: 13 March 2019 / Published: 17 March 2019
PDF Full-text (630 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Mass drug administration (MDA) is the current mainstay to interrupt the transmission of lymphatic filariasis. To monitor whether MDA is effective and transmission of lymphatic filariasis indeed has been interrupted, rigorous surveillance is required. Assessment of transmission by programme managers is usually done [...] Read more.
Mass drug administration (MDA) is the current mainstay to interrupt the transmission of lymphatic filariasis. To monitor whether MDA is effective and transmission of lymphatic filariasis indeed has been interrupted, rigorous surveillance is required. Assessment of transmission by programme managers is usually done via serology. New research suggests that xenomonitoring holds promise for determining the success of lymphatic filariasis interventions. The objective of this study was to assess Wuchereria bancrofti infection in mosquitoes as a post-MDA surveillance tool using xenomonitoring. The study was carried out in four districts of Ghana; Ahanta West, Mpohor, Kassena Nankana West and Bongo. A suite of mosquito sampling methods was employed, including human landing collections, pyrethrum spray catches and window exit traps. Infection of W. bancrofti in mosquitoes was determined using dissection, conventional and real-time polymerase chain reaction and loop mediated isothermal amplification assays. Aedes, Anopheles coustani, An. gambiae, An. pharoensis, Culex and Mansonia mosquitoes were sampled in each of the four study districts. The dissected mosquitoes were positive for filarial infection using molecular assays. Dissected An. melas mosquitoes from Ahanta West district were the only species found positive for filarial parasites. We conclude that whilst samples extracted with Trizol reagent did not show any positives, molecular methods should still be considered for monitoring and surveillance of lymphatic filariasis transmission. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Spatial Epidemiology of Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs))
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