Special Issue "Globalization and Infectious Diseases"

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Ann Marie Kimball

1. Senior Consulting Fellow, Chatham House, London, UK
2. Professor Emerita, School of Public Health, University of Washington, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: global trade and infectious disease; emerging infections; surveillance and informatics; global health policy for infectious disease control

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As the world becomes more and more connected pathogens are finding their way into new populations. At the same time the shifting ecology of our planet has provoked the incursion of novel infections into the human family. In response new and innovative global disease detection and control systems are under implementation to combat the globalization of infection and prevent pandemics. This edition will look at the main drivers of these interlocking trends through evidence based analytic papers. The final optic of the volume will be an interdisciplinary view of the globalization of human infection and the scaling of public health response to meet the challenge.

Specific topics for this edition include:

  • Factors of emergence of new human infections
  • Travel, Trade
  • Land Use, ecological change
  • Population pressure
  • Zoonotic spillover
  • Microbial Change—antimicrobial resistance
  • Global Infectious Disease surveillance and detection
  • Innovative diagnostics and their diffusion
  • Regional and global surveillance networks
  • Event based surveillance
  • Antibiotic stewardship
  • “One Health” and “Planetary Health” paradigms
  • “Hot Spots” defined and alignment of program

Dr. Ann Marie Kimball
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Human infections
  • Land Use
  • Ecological change
  • Population pressure
  • Zoonotic spillover
  • Antimicrobial resistance
  • Global Infectious Disease
  • Innovative diagnostics
  • Event based surveillance
  • Antibiotic stewardship
  • One Health
  • Planetary Health

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview Bacterial Resistance in Pneumonia in Developing Countries—A Role for Iron Chelation
Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2019, 4(2), 59; https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed4020059
Received: 3 March 2019 / Revised: 1 April 2019 / Accepted: 4 April 2019 / Published: 10 April 2019
PDF Full-text (196 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Pneumonia represents one of the major infectious diseases in developing countries and is associated with high mortality, in particular in children under the age of five. The main causative bacterial agents are Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type B, accounting for 33% and [...] Read more.
Pneumonia represents one of the major infectious diseases in developing countries and is associated with high mortality, in particular in children under the age of five. The main causative bacterial agents are Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type B, accounting for 33% and 16%, respectively, of the mortality in under-fives. Iron modulates the immune response in infectious diseases and increased iron levels can lead to complications such as sepsis and multiorgan failure. This review will look into the use of iron chelators in order to reduce microbial growth and attenuate a dysregulated immune response during infection. Our hypothesis is that temporary restriction of iron will lessen the incidence and complication rate of infections like pneumonia and result in a decrease of mortality and morbidity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Globalization and Infectious Diseases)
Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. EISSN 2414-6366 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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