Molecular Diagnosis and Risk Assessment of Helminth Infections

A special issue of Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease (ISSN 2414-6366). This special issue belongs to the section "Neglected and Emerging Tropical Diseases".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 August 2024 | Viewed by 498

Special Issue Editors

Section of Pediatric Tropical Medicine, National School of Tropical Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA
Interests: helminth; soil-transmitted nematode; vaccine; parasitology; immunology; molecular biology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Pediatrics, Section of Tropical Medicine, National School of Tropical Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA
Interests: helminth, protozoa, diagnostics; environmental testing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Helminth infections are the most common infections in humans, affecting billions of poor people in tropical and subtropical countries, with major public health issues and burdens. Helminth infections cause considerable morbidity in children, with negative impacts on their cognitive development and physical growth. Poor sanitation and limited access to clean drinking water are the significant risks of helminth infections; however, as the world economy grows, we face different risk factors, such as urbanization, globalization, labor workers, and war refugee migration, that may impact helminth infections.  The most effective way to control worm infections and reduce morbidity is mass administration of anti-helminthic drugs for school children. Successful treatments and population-based studies depend on diagnostic techniques with high accuracy. The lack of reliable molecular diagnostic tools to assess the infectious status with high sensitivity and specificity, especially for those with a low intensity of infection and population-based studies, is a major challenge for controlling worm infections. Therefore, the development of molecular diagnoses and risk assessments of helminth infections are urgently needed.

Dr. Bin Zhan
Dr. Rojelio Mejia
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • helminth
  • infection
  • deworming
  • diagnosis
  • risk assessment
  • molecular diagnostic techniques

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

9 pages, 2260 KiB  
Article
IL-33 Enhances the Total Production of IgG, IgG1, and IgG3 in Angiostrongylus cantonensis-Infected Mice
by Po-An Su, Ming-Chieh Ma, Wen-Bin Wu, Jiun-Jr Wang and Wen-Yuan Du
Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2024, 9(5), 111; https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed9050111 - 12 May 2024
Viewed by 351
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to clarify the role of IL-33 in the immune response to angiostrongyliasis, especially in terms of antibody production and isotype switching. In our experiment, C57BL/6 mice were each infected with 35 infectious larvae and were divided into [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study is to clarify the role of IL-33 in the immune response to angiostrongyliasis, especially in terms of antibody production and isotype switching. In our experiment, C57BL/6 mice were each infected with 35 infectious larvae and were divided into groups that received an intraperitoneal injection of IL-33, anti-IL-33 monoclonal antibody (mAb), or anti-ST2 mAb 3 days post-infection (dpi) and were subsequently administered booster shots at 5-day intervals with the same dose. Serum samples from each group were collected weekly for ELISA assays. The levels of total IgG, IgG1, and IgG3 were significantly increased in A. cantonensis-infected mice that were treated with IL-33, and the levels decreased significantly in infected groups treated with anti-IL-33 or anti-ST2 mAb. These results suggest that IL-33 may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of human angiostrongyliasis and could be useful for understanding protective immunity against this parasitic infection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Diagnosis and Risk Assessment of Helminth Infections)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop