Special Issue "New Challenges in Foodborne Botulism Outbreaks"

A special issue of Toxins (ISSN 2072-6651). This special issue belongs to the section "Bacterial Toxins".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Fabrizio Anniballi Website E-Mail
Istituto Superiore di Sanità – Department of Food Safety, Nutrition and Veterinary Public Health – National Reference Centre for Botulism

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Foodborne botulism still represents a public health emergency due to the high potency of botulinum toxins. Each suspected case should be immediately notified to public health authorities with the aim of preparing a prompt response. From a historical perspective, foodborne botulism cases and outbreaks increased as a consequence of the intensification of food canning. From the early 1900s to the present day, the consumer preferences have undergone a profound change and new risk factors have emerged. In the past century, supportive and therapeutic countermeasures have also been increased. As a consequence of these improvements, the mortality rate decreased from 60%–70% to 3%–5%. This Special Issue will focus on the diagnosis, epidemiology, treatment, control, and prevention of foodborne botulism outbreaks, stressing the new challenges for the management of this public health concern.

Dr. Fabrizio Anniballi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxins is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • botulism
  • botulinum toxins
  • foodborne botulism
  • outbreaks
  • prevention
  • control
  • treatment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessCommunication
Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium perfringens Occurrence in Kazakh Honey Samples
Toxins 2019, 11(8), 472; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins11080472 - 13 Aug 2019
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess occurrence of Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium perfringens in honey samples from Kazakhstan. Analyses were carried out using a set of PCR methods for identification of anaerobic bacteria, and detection of toxin genes of C. botulinum [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to assess occurrence of Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium perfringens in honey samples from Kazakhstan. Analyses were carried out using a set of PCR methods for identification of anaerobic bacteria, and detection of toxin genes of C. botulinum and C. perfringens. Among 197 samples, C. botulinum was noticed in only one (0.5%). The isolated strain of this pathogen showed the presence of the bont/A and ntnh genes. C. perfringens strains were isolated from 18 (9%) samples, and mPCR (multiplex PCR) analysis led to them all being classified as toxin type A with the ability to produce α toxin. Sequence analysis of 16S rDNA genes showed occurrence in 4 samples of other anaerobes related to C. botulinum, which were C. sporogenes and C. beijerinckii strains. C. botulinum prevalence in honey samples from Kazakhstan in comparison to the prevalence in samples collected from the other regions seems to be less. The highest prevalence of Clostridium sp. was noticed in the East Kazakhstan province. Our study is the first survey on BoNT-producing clostridia and C. perfringens prevalence in Kazakh honey. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Challenges in Foodborne Botulism Outbreaks)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Rapid Detection of Botulinum Neurotoxins—A Review
Toxins 2019, 11(7), 418; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins11070418 - 17 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
A toxin is a poisonous substance produced within living cells or organisms. One of the most potent groups of toxins currently known are the Botulinum Neurotoxins (BoNTs). These are so deadly that as little as 62 ng could kill an average human; to [...] Read more.
A toxin is a poisonous substance produced within living cells or organisms. One of the most potent groups of toxins currently known are the Botulinum Neurotoxins (BoNTs). These are so deadly that as little as 62 ng could kill an average human; to put this into context that is approximately 200,000 × less than the weight of a grain of sand. The extreme toxicity of BoNTs leads to the need for methods of determining their concentration at very low levels of sensitivity. Currently the mouse bioassay is the most widely used detection method monitoring the activity of the toxin; however, this assay is not only lengthy, it also has both cost and ethical issues due to the use of live animals. This review focuses on detection methods both existing and emerging that remove the need for the use of animals and will look at three areas; speed of detection, sensitivity of detection and finally cost. The assays will have wide reaching interest, ranging from the pharmaceutical/clinical industry for production quality management or as a point of care sensor in suspected cases of botulism, the food industry as a quality control measure, to the military, detecting BoNT that has been potentially used as a bio warfare agent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Challenges in Foodborne Botulism Outbreaks)
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