Special Issue "Mycotoxins and Its Gene Regulation"

A special issue of Toxins (ISSN 2072-6651). This special issue belongs to the section "Mycotoxins".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Hiroki Takahashi
Website
Guest Editor
Chiba University Medical Mycology Research Center
Dr. Daisuke Hagiwara
Website
Guest Editor
University of Tsukuba, Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences

Special Issue Information

Dear Collegaues,

Fungi, especially filamentous fungi, produce a diverse array of secondary metabolites (SMs), including toxic SMs, also known as mycotoxins. While among approximately 400 mycotoxins reported, most mycotoxins are known as food contamination, such as aflatoxin and ochratoxin A (OTA), some mycotoxins such as gliotoxin are involved in fungal infection in humans. Investigating the regulation mechanisms of mycotoxins is a prerequisite for controlling food contamination and pathogenicity. Comparative genomics and transcriptomics are addressing the sequence and regulation diversities of SM gene clusters, although it is conceivable that the gene regulation of SM gene clusters could be very complicated. In this Special Issue, not only current knowledge about mycotoxins but also genomics approaches with the aid of NGS are summarized.

Dr. Hiroki Takahashi
Dr. Daisuke Hagiwara
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxins is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • mycotoxins
  • gene regulation
  • food control
  • gene cluster
  • filamentous fungi

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Insights into Aflatoxin B1 Toxicity in Cattle: An In Vitro Whole-Transcriptomic Approach
Toxins 2020, 12(7), 429; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins12070429 - 29 Jun 2020
Abstract
Aflatoxins, and particularly aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), are toxic mycotoxins to humans and farm animal species, resulting in acute and chronic toxicities. At present, AFB1 is still considered a global concern with negative impacts on health, the economy, and social life. In farm animals, [...] Read more.
Aflatoxins, and particularly aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), are toxic mycotoxins to humans and farm animal species, resulting in acute and chronic toxicities. At present, AFB1 is still considered a global concern with negative impacts on health, the economy, and social life. In farm animals, exposure to AFB1-contaminated feed may cause several untoward effects, liver damage being one of the most devastating ones. In the present study, we assessed in vitro the transcriptional changes caused by AFB1 in a bovine fetal hepatocyte-derived cell line (BFH12). To boost the cellular response to AFB1, cells were pre-treated with the co-planar PCB 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126), a known aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonist. Three experimental groups were considered: cells exposed to the vehicle only, to PCB126, and to PCB126 and AFB1. A total of nine RNA-seq libraries (three replicates/group) were constructed and sequenced. The differential expression analysis showed that PCB126 induced only small transcriptional changes. On the contrary, AFB1 deeply affected the cell transcriptome, the majority of significant genes being associated with cancer, cellular damage and apoptosis, inflammation, bioactivation, and detoxification pathways. Investigating mRNA perturbations induced by AFB1 in cattle BFH12 cells will help us to better understand AFB1 toxicodynamics in this susceptible and economically important food-producing species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mycotoxins and Its Gene Regulation)
Open AccessArticle
Corn Flour Intake, Aflatoxin B1 Exposure, and Risk of Esophageal Precancerous Lesions in a High-Risk Area of Huai’an, China: A Case-Control Study
Toxins 2020, 12(5), 299; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins12050299 - 06 May 2020
Abstract
Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), which has potent toxicity and carcinogenicity, is a common contaminant of important agricultural commodities. This study aimed to investigate the frequency of corn flour intake and assess the exposure to AFB1 via direct detection of AFB [...] Read more.
Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), which has potent toxicity and carcinogenicity, is a common contaminant of important agricultural commodities. This study aimed to investigate the frequency of corn flour intake and assess the exposure to AFB1 via direct detection of AFB1 in the diet and serum AFB1 exposure biomarker, so as to evaluate their associations with the risk of esophageal precancerous lesions (EPL). A case-control study based on three-day duplicate diet samples was performed in Huai’an District. One hundred EPL cases and 100 healthy controls were enrolled and required to be age- (±2 years) and gender-matched. The concentration of AFB1 in food samples and the level of serum AFB1-albumin (AFB1-Alb) adduct were quantitatively analyzed. Results showed that corn flour intake was positively associated with serum AFB1-Alb adduct level (p for trend = 0.003), dietary AFB1 exposure (p for trend < 0.001), and the risk of EPL (p for trend = 0.017). Increased serum AFB1-Alb adduct level was associated with an increased risk of EPL as well (p for trend < 0.001). In conclusion, corn flour may be an essential source of AFB1 in Huai’an District, whereas high exposure to AFB1 is likely to be an important risk factor contributing to the progression of EPL. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mycotoxins and Its Gene Regulation)
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