Special Issue "Effects of Botulinum Toxin on Functional Recovery after Injuries of Nervous System"

A special issue of Toxins (ISSN 2072-6651). This special issue belongs to the section "Bacterial Toxins".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Siro Luvisetto
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology (IBBC), National Research Council (CNR) of Italy, 00015 - Monterotondo Scalo, Roma, Italy
Interests: botulinum neurotoxins, neuropathic pain, peripheral nerve, motor function, functional recovery, animal model, glial cells, Schwann cells
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Botulinum toxins (BoNTs) are extensively used for their therapeutic efficacy in a variety of human pathologies, most of them difficult to treat with other drugs, characterized by excessive muscle contractions due to hypercholinergic dysfunctions. This effect resides in the capacity of BoNTs to block the cholinergic transmission at the neuromuscular junction. Nowadays, the list of human disorders in which treatments with BoNTs have produced, or are expected to produce, favorable results is long and continuously growing, comprising also pathologies where the expected therapeutic action is not only at the level of the neuromuscular junction, but it is also attributable to the interaction of the toxins with other structures,  including peripheral nerves, spinal cord, central neurons, non-neural cells, and so on. In more recent years, a number of experimental and clinical studies provided positive evidences for the efficacy of BoNTs in facilitating motor and functional recovery after traumatic injuries of nervous systems. This Special Issue on “The Effect of Botulinum Toxin on Functional Recovery after Injuries of Nervous System” is particularly devoted to collecting the most recent research on the effects of BoNTs in all those conditions where impairments of motor function are the consequence of traumatic injuries on the nervous system. Both review and research articles are welcome, not only from animal studies but also from clinical trials or case reports. The ambitious purpose of this Special Issue is to provide an up-to-date picture of the state of art on the development of novel BoNT applications to ameliorate the functional recovery after motor impairment resulting from trauma to the brain, the spinal cord or the peripheral nerves, such as spasticity after stroke, paralysis after spinal cord injury, hemiparesis after peripheral nerves degeneration, and so on.

Dr. Siro Luvisetto
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxins is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Botulinum neurotoxins
  • Peripheral nerve injury
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Post-stroke spasticity
  • Axonal regeneration
  • Functional recovery
  • Experimental models
  • Clinical studies
  • Rehabilitation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Botulinum Toxin Injections on Gross Motor Function for Lower Limb Spasticity in Children with Cerebral Palsy
Toxins 2019, 11(11), 651; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins11110651 - 08 Nov 2019
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the use of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injections and their efficacy on gross motor function for lower limb spasticity in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). This retrospective study included 919 injection occasions from [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to investigate the use of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injections and their efficacy on gross motor function for lower limb spasticity in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). This retrospective study included 919 injection occasions from 591 children with CP who received a lower limb BoNT-A injection between 2006 and 2016. The Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM-88), the Modified Ashworth Scale, and the Modified Tardieu Scale were administered before and after injections. Injections were predominantly administered to children under the age of 6 years. The most common muscle injection site was the calf muscle for dynamic foot deformity. The second most commonly injected muscle was the hip adductor among 2–3 year olds and the hamstring muscle among 4–6 year olds. Distal injections were predominantly administered to high-functioning children, whereas proximal injections were typically administered to low-functioning children. Multilevel injections were mostly administered to midfunctioning children. GMFM-88 scores significantly increased post-injection for both high- and low-functioning groups. Younger age at injection and distal injection type were associated with larger improvements on the GMFM-88 at both short- and midterm follow-up. The target muscles for injection varied depending on gross motor functioning and age. Younger age at injection and distal injection type were significantly related with greater gain in gross motor function. Full article
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