Foodborne Toxins: Immunodetection and Analysis of Pathogenic Bacterial Toxins

A special issue of Toxins (ISSN 2072-6651). This special issue belongs to the section "Bacterial Toxins".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 113

Special Issue Editors

Foodborne Toxin Detection and Prevention Research Unit, Western Regional Research Center, USDA‐ARS, 800 Buchanan St., Albany, CA 94710, USA
Interests: molecular tools and technologies for rapid; accurate and sensitive detection and quantification of zoonotic pathogens and toxins in food; mechanisms of interactions between bacterial toxins and host cells; binding between antigen and antibody or receptors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Foodborne Toxin Detection and Prevention Research Unit, Western Regional Research Center, USDA‐ARS, 800 Buchanan St., Albany, CA 94710, USA
Interests: foodborne toxins; antifungal agents; mechanisms of interactions between bacterial toxins and host cells
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Foodborne bacterial diseases are a major cause of human morbidity and mortality. They are a global concern that affects public health and places, causing undue economic burdens on consumers as well as significant economic losses for farmers, manufacturers, and retailers. Bacterial toxins are the major virulence factors that promote infection. In many cases, the production of toxins and the subsequent intoxication of the host after the oral ingestion of contaminated foods leads to the development of disease. Recent foodborne outbreaks have also provided new insights into newly described bacterial toxins, which are not typically regarded as foodborne pathogens. Current technologies for the detection of bacterial toxins include many different platforms including a multitude of immune-based assays (i.e., ELISAs, biosensors, etc.). Therefore, to ensure a safe food supply, advances in diagnostic detection technologies that are rapid, sensitive, and portable are critical. New immune-based methods to detect toxins from known and unknown bacterial pathogens in a variety of complex matrices must be developed to aid food processors and regulatory agencies to adequately monitor the safety of our food. This Special Issue of “Foodborne Toxins: Immunodetection and Analysis of Pathogenic Bacterial Toxins” will focus on the analysis of bacterial toxins and advances in immune-based detection approaches. Review and research papers describing established and novel concepts are welcome.

Dr. Xiaohua He
Dr. Christina Tam
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxins is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bacterial toxins
  • food safety
  • immunoassays
  • detection
  • ELISA
  • biosensors
  • antibodies

Published Papers

This special issue is now open for submission.
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