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Topical Collection "Sustainable Citizenship and Education"

Editors

Dr. Emilio José Delgado-Algarra
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Integrated Didactics, Universidad de Huelva, Avenida de la Fuerzas Armadas, S/N, 21007 Huelva, Spain
Interests: educational technologies; digital citizenship; didactics of social sciences; didactics of history; citizenship education; historical memory; teacher training
Dr. César Bernal-Bravo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Education Sciences, Language, Culture and Arts, Rey Juan Carlos University, Paseo Artilleros s/n, 28032 Madrid, Spain
Interests: digital citizenship; citizenship education; didactics of social sciences; innovation in social sciences; use of ICTs in social sciences
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Antonio Alejandro Lorca-Marín
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Integrated Didactics, Universidad de Huelva, Avenida de la Fuerzas Armadas, S/N, 21007 Huelva, Spain
Interests: educational technologies; didactics of experimental sciences; conceptions; teacher training; problem-based learning

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the last several decades, habitat loss, the overexploitation of natural resources, and pollution have led to catastrophic decreases in biodiversity 1. Sustainability represents the maximal achievement using the minimumfrom environmental, social, and economic points of view, considering climatic responsiveness, efficiency, and the balance between the natural environment and artificial configurations 2,3. Since the 1980s, together with the impulse of globalization, the debate on what citizenship is and how to educate for democratic citizenship has intensified, with the participation of universities, public institutions, and international organizations 4. In accordance with the current environmental situation, sustainable citizenship and education have become key elements to ensure the future of humanity, and they are essential to foster sustainability awareness, critical participation, and socio-environmental improvement.

Connected with the importance of sustainable citizenship participation and sustainable education, the United Nations published The Sustainable Development Goals 5, which include aspects such as Quality Education (Goal 4), Sustainable Cities and Communities (Goal 11), Responsible Consumption and Production (Goal 12), Climate Action (Goal 13), and Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions (Goal 16). Regarding this, education has become a fundamental means for transformation of the economy and society around the welfare of citizens, the sustainability of human activities, and the stability of the environment.

The scope of this Special Issue is to provide a platform for researchers to share their innovative work, in the form of conceptual and research articles, about the role of education in fostering sustainable commitment, sustainable participation, and social and economic transformation, among other related issues. This special section will focus on (but is not limited to) the following topics:

  • Sustainable citizenship education;
  • Educational institutions and sustainable citizenship;
  • Educational approaches and sustainable citizenship;
  • Education for sustainable commitment;
  • Education for sustainable participation;
  • Sustainable education for social transformation;
  • Sustainable cities and education;
  • Sustainable communities and education;
  • Education for responsible consumption;
  • Education for climate action;
  • Education for peace;
  • Justice-oriented education.

Dr. Eloy López Meneses
Dr. Emilio José Delgado-Algarra
Dr. César Bernal-Bravo
Dr. Antonio Alejandro Lorca-Marín
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • educational institutions
  • educational approaches
  • sustainable citizenship education
  • education for sustainable commitment
  • education for sustainable participation
  • sustainable education for social transformation
  • sustainable cities
  • sustainable communities
  • education for responsible consumption
  • education for climate action
  • education for peace
  • justice-oriented education

Published Papers (26 papers)

2022

Jump to: 2021, 2020

Article
Creating Spaces for Intersubjectivity: A Sustainable Vision for Democratic Citizenship Education
Sustainability 2022, 14(13), 7702; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14137702 (registering DOI) - 24 Jun 2022
Viewed by 169
Abstract
Responding to the multiculturalist critiques of deliberative democratic education, Amy Gutmann and Sigal Ben-Porath suggested a more inclusive version of deliberative democratic education that emphasizes toleration, public recognition, and mutual respect. Despite its benefits and possibilities, however, their concept of democratic education fails [...] Read more.
Responding to the multiculturalist critiques of deliberative democratic education, Amy Gutmann and Sigal Ben-Porath suggested a more inclusive version of deliberative democratic education that emphasizes toleration, public recognition, and mutual respect. Despite its benefits and possibilities, however, their concept of democratic education fails to embrace poststructuralist ideas regarding democratic education. In the pursuit of a sustainable vision for democratic citizenship education, this study sought to conceptualize hybrid spaces wherein an ontology of plurality is woven into Gutmann and Ben-Porath’s idea of deliberative democratic education. By proposing an alternative way to integrate poststructuralist ideas such as intersubjective accounts of self-identity and human agency into the current practice of deliberative democratic education, the authors seek to promote continued dialogue on the purposes and possibilities of education for a more sustainable and democratic society. Full article
Article
Learning to Succeed? Interplay between Ethnic Identity, National Identity, and Students’ Perception on Social Mobility in a Xinjiang Class School of China
Sustainability 2022, 14(8), 4444; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14084444 - 08 Apr 2022
Viewed by 465
Abstract
While studies on students’ ethnic identity, national identity and social mobility gained relatively good research development in Western societies, little attention has been given to other social contexts, particularly non-Western societies like China. A questionnaire (N = 570, aged 14 to 20) was [...] Read more.
While studies on students’ ethnic identity, national identity and social mobility gained relatively good research development in Western societies, little attention has been given to other social contexts, particularly non-Western societies like China. A questionnaire (N = 570, aged 14 to 20) was conducted in a Xinjiang Class school in Southern China to examine the nexus of students’ ethnic identity, national identity and perception on social mobility. The Xinjiang Class is currently one of the most iconic preferential educational policies recruiting students from ethnic groups in Xinjiang (an ethnic minority-concentrated border region) and offering them senior secondary education in select Han-centric, senior-secondary schools in China’s central and east coast provinces. The results demonstrate that the strengthening effect of students’ ethnic identity on national identity is not obvious; students’ strong national identity contributes to their positive perception on upward social mobility. However, the widely accepted viewpoint that students’ ethnic identity has a negative influence on perception of social mobility cannot be fully supported in this case. This study enriches the extant literature by providing a combined model to explore the nuanced mechanisms between ethnic identity, national identity and students’ perception on social mobility in a multi-ethnic society and by helping to unveil the identity politics unfolded in current China’s educational sector. Full article
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Article
Neglected Part of Education Sustainability: Social Work Intervention on the Quality of Extracurricular Life of Migrant Workers’ Children
Sustainability 2022, 14(5), 2486; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14052486 - 22 Feb 2022
Viewed by 432
Abstract
The extracurricular life and education of migrant children are significant to the formation of personality and values, but it has been ignored for a long time. The aim of this study is to obtain evidence supporting the theoretical argument that social work intervention [...] Read more.
The extracurricular life and education of migrant children are significant to the formation of personality and values, but it has been ignored for a long time. The aim of this study is to obtain evidence supporting the theoretical argument that social work intervention in extracurricular education can have a positive impact on migrant children’s learning ability, social adaptability, personality, and interest shaping. From the perspective of practice, including participatory observation and case study method, this paper analyzes the situation of 71 migrant children in order to improve their extracurricular life quality by social work intervention. In the short term, project members have generally developed good study habits. In the long term, the academic performance is generally excellent, which is beneficial to the development of school teaching tasks. The project has an obvious beneficial impact on the academic learning ability and mental health of migrant workers’ children, especially the ability of social adaptation and the shaping of personality interests. The project helps to strengthen the sustainability of migrant children’s education. Full article

2021

Jump to: 2022, 2020

Article
The Landscapes of Sustainability in the Library and Information Science: Systematic Literature Review
Sustainability 2022, 14(1), 441; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14010441 - 31 Dec 2021
Viewed by 697
Abstract
In times of real threats to the continuity of the human civilization resulting from environmental degradation, depletion of natural resources, overpopulation, and other adverse factors, the issue of sustainable development is the subject of interest of many scientific disciplines. As a leading objective [...] Read more.
In times of real threats to the continuity of the human civilization resulting from environmental degradation, depletion of natural resources, overpopulation, and other adverse factors, the issue of sustainable development is the subject of interest of many scientific disciplines. As a leading objective of this paper, the authors take up the topic of sustainable development seen through the lenses of the library and information science, which is considered with special attention paid to its economic, social, environmental, and cultural dimensions. In addition to reviewing the most important literature, the authors also explore the subject matter from a quantitative perspective. As a result of the research, the authors identify the key areas that affect libraries as cultural and scientific institutions, in which work related to the sustainability concept is actively carried out. Quantitative research allowed to determine the proportions of efforts made by scientists within the previously selected areas, and to outline trends observed within those areas—that is, to identify which areas have recently been gaining importance, and which may have ceased to be exploited. The authors hope that the research results not only shed light on the landscape of world science in the subject matter, but above all, that they support contemporary researches of these fields by identifying potentially the most important works influencing the shape of particular research areas, and the identification of current trends, which are present within the mentioned areas as well. Further research directions, which are potentially worth undertaking, are also emphasized. Full article
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Article
Education for Citizenship: The Meanings Chilean Teachers Convey in the Neoliberal Context
Sustainability 2021, 13(23), 13390; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132313390 - 03 Dec 2021
Viewed by 439
Abstract
This article presents the results from research into education for citizenship in which Chilean teachers participated. Ninety-nine interviews and two focal groups that included questions on knowledge, beliefs, values and practices related to education for citizenship were carried out. NVivo 12 software was [...] Read more.
This article presents the results from research into education for citizenship in which Chilean teachers participated. Ninety-nine interviews and two focal groups that included questions on knowledge, beliefs, values and practices related to education for citizenship were carried out. NVivo 12 software was used for the analysis of the discourses, following the direction similar to the grounded theory that considers elaborating free nodes, structuring categories and configuring categorical trees, according to the school’s administrative dependency. The results yield six macro-categories: School, Authoritarianism, Neoliberalism, Curriculum, Teacher Role and Citizenship. The present article analyses the Neoliberalism macro-category formed, in turn, by the following subcategories: (1) subject and resistance, (2) competitiveness and individualism in a subject that is instrumental, consumer and reproducer of the establishment, (3) commodified schools, where the economic value regards students and families as clients, (4) a culture of bureaucratization and accountability, and (5) lack of a sense of communality as a collective, supportive body. In all of them, teachers show themselves eloquently critical of the neoliberal system and of the obstacles it poses to rights, justice and democracy in the current capitalist citizenship and school. Full article
Article
The Relationship between Academic Dishonesty, Ethical Attitude and Ethical Climate: The Evidence from Taiwan
Sustainability 2021, 13(21), 11615; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132111615 - 21 Oct 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 587
Abstract
Academic dishonesty has become a global issue widely studied in many countries. Plagiarism using the Internet is prevalent across the world and seems to be increasing, affecting the reputation of schools and even countries. On the basis of the social cognitive theory and [...] Read more.
Academic dishonesty has become a global issue widely studied in many countries. Plagiarism using the Internet is prevalent across the world and seems to be increasing, affecting the reputation of schools and even countries. On the basis of the social cognitive theory and the theory of planned behavior, this study explored the relationship between ethical attitude and academic dishonesty, and we focused on the moderating effect of ethical climate on the relationship. A survey of 1271 students (745 female students, 526 male students; mean age = 16.38 years, SD = 0.76) from 31 senior high schools in Taiwan was conducted and analyzed using hierarchical regression by SPSS 26 to test the hypotheses of this study. The result shows that: (1) Compared with male students, female students had a more positive attitude towards ethical attitude and showed less academic dishonesty. Compared with general senior high school students, vocational senior high school students showed a more positive ethical attitude and a positive ethical climate; (2) ethical attitude was negatively related to academic dishonesty; (3) high ethical climate strengthened the negative relationship between ethical attitude and academic dishonesty. In addition, the theoretical implications, practical implications, and directions for future research are also discussed in this article. The result of the study can be a credible reference for educational researchers and educational administrative systems, when planning ethical-related courses or educational policies for high schools with more emphasis on academic dishonesty and other relevant issues. Full article
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Article
The Relationship between Smartphone Addiction, Parent–Child Relationship, Loneliness and Self-Efficacy among Senior High School Students in Taiwan
Sustainability 2021, 13(16), 9475; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13169475 - 23 Aug 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1528
Abstract
This study explores the link between smartphone addiction in senior high-school students, parent–child relationship, loneliness, and self-efficacy on the basis of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and social cognitive theory (SCT). A survey of 2172 students (1205 female students, 966 male students; [...] Read more.
This study explores the link between smartphone addiction in senior high-school students, parent–child relationship, loneliness, and self-efficacy on the basis of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and social cognitive theory (SCT). A survey of 2172 students (1205 female students, 966 male students; mean age = 16.58 years, SD = 0.78) from 32 senior high schools in Taiwan was conducted. Moderation mediation analysis was performed using Model 14 of SPSS PROCESS-macro to test the hypotheses of this study. The result showed that the parent–child relationship was negatively related both to smartphone addiction and loneliness, which mediated the link between parent–child relationship and smartphone addiction. Self-efficacy was also found to moderate the level of loneliness related to smartphone addiction. Specifically, loneliness will ease when the parent–child relationship improves, and smartphone addiction will accordingly lessen. It was also discovered that the elevation of self-efficacy could mitigate the level of addiction. Lastly, this study provided parents, education agencies, and other policymakers in the education sector with implications based on these findings. Preventive measures for smartphone addiction and recommendations for future investigations are also given. Full article
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Article
Stop Piling on: Assessing Efforts to Reduce Single-Use Water Bottles at Allegheny College
Sustainability 2021, 13(16), 8864; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13168864 - 08 Aug 2021
Viewed by 1000
Abstract
Plastic waste represents one of the largest environmental problems of the modern era and disposable water bottles comprise a substantial portion of that waste in the U.S. Colleges are in a unique position to create systems that foster sustainable behaviors among their constituents. [...] Read more.
Plastic waste represents one of the largest environmental problems of the modern era and disposable water bottles comprise a substantial portion of that waste in the U.S. Colleges are in a unique position to create systems that foster sustainable behaviors among their constituents. Since 2015, Allegheny College has installed water refill stations, and initiated a free water bottle program and an awareness campaign to reduce single-use bottles on the college’s campus. Two surveys were distributed to the student body between 2018 and 2019 to assess the efficacy of those initiatives and learn about any barriers. Bottled water use has reduced significantly since 2014, with the majority of students stating that they most commonly drink water from refill stations while on campus. Demographic factors like income, sex, or place of origin were not related to the amount of bottled water consumption or type of water preference among students. The primary barrier to students eliminating disposable water bottle use was found to be a lack of water refill stations in dormitories. Research aimed at changing behaviors to benefit the environment should consider the barrier of convenience. This research provides a valuable lesson that can extend beyond college campuses and into public settings. Full article
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Article
Complex Thinking and Sustainable Social Development: Validity and Reliability of the COMPLEX-21 Scale
Sustainability 2021, 13(12), 6591; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13126591 - 09 Jun 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1301
Abstract
Thinking skills are essential to achieve sustainable social development. Nonetheless, there is no specific instrument that assesses all of these skills as a whole. The present study aimed to design and validate a scale to assess complex thinking skills in adult people. A [...] Read more.
Thinking skills are essential to achieve sustainable social development. Nonetheless, there is no specific instrument that assesses all of these skills as a whole. The present study aimed to design and validate a scale to assess complex thinking skills in adult people. A scale of 22 items assessing the following aspects: analysis and problem solving, critical analysis, metacognition, systemic analysis, and creativity, in five levels, was created. This scale was validated in 626 university students from Peru. In total, 16 experts in the field helped to determine the content validity of the scale (Aiken’s V value higher than 0.8). The confirmatory factor analysis allowed the evaluation of the structure of the five factors theoretically proposed and the goodness of fit indexes was satisfactory. An item was eliminated during the process and the scale resulted in 21 items. The composite reliability for the different factors was ranged between 0.794 and 0.867. The invariance between genders was also checked and the concurrent validity was proved. The study concludes that the content validity, construct validity, concurrent validity, and composite reliability levels of the COMPLEX-21 scale are appropriate. Full article
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Article
The Use of Activities and Resources in Archaeological Museums for the Teaching of History in Formal Education
Sustainability 2021, 13(8), 4095; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13084095 - 07 Apr 2021
Viewed by 695
Abstract
The research objectives of this paper are to compare the activities which have been prepared in the design of field trips from the perspective of teachers and museum educators, as well as to describe the use of resources and materials from the point [...] Read more.
The research objectives of this paper are to compare the activities which have been prepared in the design of field trips from the perspective of teachers and museum educators, as well as to describe the use of resources and materials from the point of view of educational agents. The research method is quantitative, based on the study of a descriptive comparative cross-sectional survey. The participants are 442 teachers of early years, primary and secondary education, visiting two archaeological museums with their class groups in order to carry out an activity relating to the subject of history. The data collection tool was the MUSELA© questionnaire. The main results show that 60% of the teachers state that they prepare some kind of activities and 70% use some resources within the design of a field trip to an archaeological museum. On the other hand, 94.4% of the museum educators carry out activities using resources in the museum visit. The main conclusion is that the activities which are most used by teachers and educators in the museum (experimentation and artistic workshops, audio-visual observation and viewing tasks and debates or sharing) and by teachers in the classroom space (audio-visual viewing) do not guarantee research activities, analysis or reflection activities. Full article
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Article
Twitter as a Tool for Citizen Education and Sustainable Cities after COVID-19
Sustainability 2021, 13(6), 3514; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063514 - 22 Mar 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1359
Abstract
The social confinement resulting from the COVID-19 crisis temporarily reduced greenhouse gas emissions. Although experts contend that the decrease in pollution rates was not drastic, some surveys detect growth in social concern about the climate. In this new climate-conscious environment, municipalities and local [...] Read more.
The social confinement resulting from the COVID-19 crisis temporarily reduced greenhouse gas emissions. Although experts contend that the decrease in pollution rates was not drastic, some surveys detect growth in social concern about the climate. In this new climate-conscious environment, municipalities and local governments are promoting a new way of living and caring for cities, even before they can regain national and international freedom of movement. This work analyzes the connections between new climate awareness arising from the COVID-19 crisis, proposals of sustainable citizenship around the world, and its communication on Twitter to educate the new eco-conscious audience. The methodology mixes quantitative and qualitative analysis, using the Twitonomy Premium tool and the Twitter research tool with data extracted at the end of December 2020. Among the top ten most influential and active accounts, the results show educational institutions, local institutions, companies, neighborhoods, associations, and influencers. The impossibility of living in the city has not prevented citizen education and commitment to make real change for when that city and its citizens return to normality. However, this new normality must be different: more ecological, more responsible, more sustainable, and practiced from early childhood. Full article
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Article
Social Justice, Participation and School during the COVID-19—The International Project Gira por la Infancia
Sustainability 2021, 13(5), 2704; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052704 - 03 Mar 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1350
Abstract
The purpose of this article is to present the data which have been obtained in a research project on education during coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the framework of the international project Gira por la Infancia 2020. The aim was to construct [...] Read more.
The purpose of this article is to present the data which have been obtained in a research project on education during coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the framework of the international project Gira por la Infancia 2020. The aim was to construct a critical, active, and participatory citizenship. The method used has been the pedagogical hermeneutic in which the qualitative analysis of data was preceded by a process of child participation which allowed the analysis of the opinions of 6867 children and adolescents from 22 countries and 3 continents. The results present the children’s thinking about the closure of schools, the alternative teaching carried out, the role of teachers and families, and on the return of the "new school" with the health protocols. This work provides the children’s view on the measures of social distancing and massive school closures. However, without doubt, it also shows children’s and adolescents’ potential to empower themselves in complex situations which put the world’s schools in an unprecedented crisis. In addition, it shows the opportunity to take into consideration a joint construction of a society from the germ of its citizenship: children. Full article
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Article
Key Competences and the Transfer of Social Knowledge: Perceptions of Secondary School Pupils
Sustainability 2021, 13(4), 2299; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13042299 - 20 Feb 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 616
Abstract
The aim of this work is to find out the perception that students in 4th year compulsory secondary education have of the teaching of key competences, as well as the possibility these have of being transferred to a real, everyday situation, according to [...] Read more.
The aim of this work is to find out the perception that students in 4th year compulsory secondary education have of the teaching of key competences, as well as the possibility these have of being transferred to a real, everyday situation, according to what they have learned in the subject of Geography and History. For this, an intentional sample was configured in which more than 1400 subjects from 4th year of secondary education (in Spain) have participated, with a level of significance of 0.05 using a scale—original and unpublished—called (EPECOCISO—Evaluation of the Perception of Social Science Competences). It is a quantitative descriptive study in which—through an exploratory factorial analysis—factors 1, 2, and 3 have been selected for the realization of a descriptive study. Subsequently, correlation between factors has been established through the Pearson test and between the different variables that make up each one of them with the socio-demographic variables (distinguishing between ordinal and nominal variables), through the chi-square independence test and Cramer’s V test (nominal) and the linearity test and Goodman’s and Kruskal’s Gamma test (ordinal). Finally, it can be concluded that a methodology based and organized around the development of critical thinking facilitates the acquisition of contents and competences, as well as allowing students to detect the possibility of transferring them and putting them into practice in a real situation that can be presented. Full article
Article
Sustainable Development Goals and Education: A Bibliometric Mapping Analysis
Sustainability 2021, 13(4), 2126; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13042126 - 17 Feb 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1769
Abstract
The 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda sets out 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) aimed at improving life in all its dimensions, covering all sectors, with a particular emphasis on education. The study presented here focuses on universities as priority organisations and agents of change [...] Read more.
The 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda sets out 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) aimed at improving life in all its dimensions, covering all sectors, with a particular emphasis on education. The study presented here focuses on universities as priority organisations and agents of change within the sphere of their social commitment. We thus conducted an analysis of the related scientific production as well as a bibliometric mapping, identifying the main publications indexed in the Web of Science, within its main collection. Focusing on scientific production, we examine the types of documents published, the evolution of the number of publications, the countries of origin of the publications, the most cited sources and articles, together with the most productive authors and a co-citation analysis. Regarding the bibliometric mapping analysis, the five core clusters included in the study were: SDGs in general; SDG 4 on Quality Education; Education for Sustainable Development; Higher Education; and Education Management. Among the main conclusions reached, we would emphasise the need for a change in role and function of university education to tackle sustainable development. Full article
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Article
The Effects of School Climate on Sixth Form Teachers’ Self-Efficacy in Malaysia
Sustainability 2021, 13(4), 2011; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13042011 - 13 Feb 2021
Viewed by 828
Abstract
In Malaysia, sixth form is a post-secondary education that is comparable to pre-university programs such as A-level and Foundation qualifications. Enrolment in sixth forms has dwindled over the past ten years due to assumptions that the curriculum is difficult and because it is [...] Read more.
In Malaysia, sixth form is a post-secondary education that is comparable to pre-university programs such as A-level and Foundation qualifications. Enrolment in sixth forms has dwindled over the past ten years due to assumptions that the curriculum is difficult and because it is offered in regular secondary schools. Thus, the sixth form transformation program was introduced in 2015 with the purpose to rebrand sixth form education to a new setting comparable to other pre-university education, with a focus on improving the school climate and increasing teacher self-efficacy. Therefore, this study was conducted to identify the level and relationship of the school climate on teacher self-efficacy. This survey was carried out using a questionnaire instrument, involving 695 sixth form teachers currently in Selangor. The findings showed that the level of school climate and teacher self-efficacy in all sixth form centers were at a high level. There was also a strong positive relationship between the school climate and sixth form teachers’ self-efficacy. Social and academic dimensions contributed significantly to the teacher self-efficacy of 38%. Hence, further studies looking at aspects that suggestively contribute to the school climate should be given due attention to ensure that transformation planning can be implemented as intended. Full article
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Article
Sustainable Education, Emotional Intelligence and Mother–Child Reading Competencies within Multiple Mediation Models
Sustainability 2021, 13(4), 1803; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13041803 - 07 Feb 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1075
Abstract
The influence of the family on the education of children is indisputable, and the mother plays a fundamental role as a direct influence on the educational process of children, especially on their reading competence. Systematically, the role of education has been delegated to [...] Read more.
The influence of the family on the education of children is indisputable, and the mother plays a fundamental role as a direct influence on the educational process of children, especially on their reading competence. Systematically, the role of education has been delegated to the teacher when, even in academic aspects, the values of a society influence the education of the new generations. A sustainable society goes through a sustainable education, instilling values from a well-developed emotional intelligence. The objective of this study is to establish for first time the existence of relationships among reading habits, sex, and mother′s emotional intelligence regarding the reading comprehension of children. Participants included 521 adolescent baccalaureates aged between 16 and 17 years old, who attended three public baccalaureate schools in the province of Málaga and four public high schools in the province of Granada, all located in areas of medium socio-cultural context. Mediation and factorial analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) analyses were performed. The results show that girls with higher emotional intelligence and whose mothers have higher reading habits obtain higher reading competence. Full article
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Article
Educommunication and Archaeological Heritage in Italy and Spain: An Analysis of Institutions’ Use of Twitter, Sustainability, and Citizen Participation
Sustainability 2021, 13(4), 1602; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13041602 - 03 Feb 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1202
Abstract
Improving heritage educommunication on the web 2.0 is key to reaching certain sustainable development goals focused on educational quality and citizen participation. Although numerous partial studies have already been conducted, to date neither assessment tools nor detailed studies are available regarding the quality [...] Read more.
Improving heritage educommunication on the web 2.0 is key to reaching certain sustainable development goals focused on educational quality and citizen participation. Although numerous partial studies have already been conducted, to date neither assessment tools nor detailed studies are available regarding the quality of educommunicative initiatives. Spain and Italy’s archaeological heritage museums have a consolidated track record on Twitter, which has been bolstered by museum closures due to COVID-19 and has resulted in a significant change to their educommunicative policies. The present article aims to analyze educommunicative actions undertaken on Twitter at Italian archaeological museums, compare their strategies with a previous study on Spanish institutions, and analyze to what degree the sustainability of heritage, citizen participation, learning opportunities, and universal access are being promoted. This mixed method analysis was carried out through the implementation of a web 2.0 heritage educommunication analysis tool focused on three key factors: educational procedure, R-elational interactions, and the prevailing learning paradigm, as well as a content analysis of the variables that comprise them. The key findings suggest that neither country is close to achieving a quality educommunicative strategy. Italian archaeological heritage institutions use Twitter simply as an advertising platform. Despite being a social media platform, participative initiatives are scarcely promoted, although heritage sustainability is promoted through raising awareness of conservation and appreciation. Spanish institutions, however, demonstrated the opposite pattern of use. Full article
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2020

Jump to: 2022, 2021

Article
Citizen Science as Part of the Primary School Curriculum: A Case Study of a Technical Day on the Topic of Noise and Health
Sustainability 2020, 12(23), 10213; https://doi.org/10.3390/su122310213 - 07 Dec 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1451
Abstract
In this paper, we summarise lessons learned conducting citizen science (CS) activities within the CitieS-Health H2020 project on the topic of noise exposure and health at a primary school in Ljubljana, Slovenia. Activities were organised in the form of a School Tech-Day Event [...] Read more.
In this paper, we summarise lessons learned conducting citizen science (CS) activities within the CitieS-Health H2020 project on the topic of noise exposure and health at a primary school in Ljubljana, Slovenia. Activities were organised in the form of a School Tech-Day Event (STDE) as part of the school’s curriculum involving second-grade pupils, ages 7–8. The STDE was aligned with the project’s methodological framework, which is based on co-creation and co-design principles. To this end, the pupils initially were involved in identifying noise-related issues and translation of selected topics into research questions. Next, together with mentors, they participated in the process of hypothesis formulation and the designing of data collection protocols. Finally, they participated in three focussed noise measurement experiments, as well as data analysis and presentation. We report and critically evaluate the whole chain of activities, focussing on the participant dimension using selected components of the citizen science evaluation framework. The event was very well-received by both pupils and teachers, and their active participation and hands-on experience with scientific processes contributed to their improved scientific literacy. Overall, the demonstrated concept of CS activities has great potential for ongoing inclusion in the school curriculum in its current format, or else adjusted according to specifics from other science and technology fields. Full article
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Article
Black Soldier Fly School Workshops as Means to Promote Circular Economy and Environmental Awareness
Sustainability 2020, 12(22), 9574; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12229574 - 17 Nov 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1754
Abstract
Today, insect applications for food and feed are of strong economic, ecological and social interest. Despite their tremendous potential, insects still elicit negative associations in the mindset of Western consumers, which is attributed to a lack of knowledge and scarce opportunities for engagement [...] Read more.
Today, insect applications for food and feed are of strong economic, ecological and social interest. Despite their tremendous potential, insects still elicit negative associations in the mindset of Western consumers, which is attributed to a lack of knowledge and scarce opportunities for engagement in this topic. The citizen science project ‘six-legged livestock’ aims to increase the potential of the insect Hermetia illucens (black soldier fly), merging the topics ‘waste re-valorisation’ and ‘protein production’ as a cross-link to circular economy. Workshops were held in four school classes, involving 89 pupils, aged 15 to 18 years old. Making use of organic wastes, participating school classes ran eight rearing systems containing a total of 1800 H. illucens larvae. In the four-week experiments, the pupils monitored larval growth and development. Evidently, the pupils were highly motivated to run their rearing systems and fulfil their working tasks. Furthermore, negative associations with insects, including phobia and scepticism decreased, while excitement for the topic increased after hands-on work with the insects. The presented project may be considered an innovative approach paving the way for the establishment of insects as an important educational tool, since they are still underrepresented in scholarly curricula, despite the public outrage over insect decline. Full article
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Article
Sustainable Distance Education: Comparison of Digital Pedagogical Models
Sustainability 2020, 12(21), 9067; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12219067 - 31 Oct 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1189
Abstract
The literature shows strong evidence of how different learning models influence learning. The kind of model used is a basic variable that can either help or hinder sustainable education. The objective of this research is to analyse how digital pedagogical models of three [...] Read more.
The literature shows strong evidence of how different learning models influence learning. The kind of model used is a basic variable that can either help or hinder sustainable education. The objective of this research is to analyse how digital pedagogical models of three kinds (collaborative, social, and independent) influence the learning experience. The study is based on a design that combines triangulation, a theoretical model, quantitative methods (descriptive analysis and contrast of means), and qualitative methods (discourse analysis, following the principles of grounded theory). The importance of social and collaborative models in sustainable education is proved; both types of models promote a positive learning experience. They strengthen inter-student relationships, a feeling of belonging to a community with shared interests, and feelings of membership and cohesion. An independent model may hamper students’ perception of current knowledge and development of collaborative competences, in contrast to the more-interactive model. These results can be assessed in greater depth through future research exploring independent models’ possible potential for analysing environmental problems and their tie-in to personal decisions. Full article
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Article
Citizenship Training through sMOOCs: A Participative and Intercreative Learning
Sustainability 2020, 12(20), 8301; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12208301 - 09 Oct 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 985
Abstract
sMOOCs (social massive open online courses) have revealed themselves as a remarkable opportunity to foster the culture of participation and open knowledge and sustainability. Due to their communicative potential, they make it possible for participants to interact, to create ubiquitous learning, and to [...] Read more.
sMOOCs (social massive open online courses) have revealed themselves as a remarkable opportunity to foster the culture of participation and open knowledge and sustainability. Due to their communicative potential, they make it possible for participants to interact, to create ubiquitous learning, and to build knowledge in a collective way. This educational and communicative line has set the basis for the European ECO (e-learning, communication, open data) Project, i.e., the purpose of our study, which, beyond training teachers, is decidedly betting on open life-long education. The results presented in the study have been elicited by following a quantitative methodology, through the analysis of a “sMOOC Step by Step” community, intended to become an educational gate to students’ empowerment, shared knowledge, and participation in the course. Results show that collaborative work practices organized by teachers in that virtual learning community encourage educational changes. Both the degree of satisfaction with the learning achieved and the way students perceive its direct applicability to real-life professional contexts prove the effectiveness of this training model. Our research has expanded, aiming to discover sMOOCs opportunities for teacher training and assessing the motivation shown by the virtual learning community towards such an educational reality. Full article
Article
Social Networks Consumption and Addiction in College Students during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Educational Approach to Responsible Use
Sustainability 2020, 12(18), 7737; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12187737 - 18 Sep 2020
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 6972
Abstract
Within the framework of digital sustainability, the increase in Internet consumption, and especially online social networks, offers social benefits, but is not without its drawbacks. For example, it can lead to psychological and/or psychiatric disorders in some people. Numerous researches are highlighting the [...] Read more.
Within the framework of digital sustainability, the increase in Internet consumption, and especially online social networks, offers social benefits, but is not without its drawbacks. For example, it can lead to psychological and/or psychiatric disorders in some people. Numerous researches are highlighting the similarities of these addictions with the consumption of toxic substances. University students are heavy users of the Internet and, in certain situations, addiction to online social networks can be the result of depression, harassment, and anxiety, among others, affecting their daily life, including their academic responsibilities. In recent months, an anomaly has occurred that may have contributed to intensifying this problem, namely the confinement produced by the COVID-19 pandemic, which has affected the whole world to a greater or lesser extent. In this cross-sectional study, with a descriptive and quantitative methodology, students from 14 Spanish universities were investigated in the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in order to understand the effects of this situation on the problem described. The results show a high consumption of social networks during that time, with significant incidences of addiction. In parallel, the presence of comorbidity has been determined. In this scenario, it would be necessary to implement university educational programs to redirect these addictive behaviors, as well as preventative recommendations and actions to minimize negative impacts. This is a major problem that is growing, exacerbated by the global pandemic produced by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. Situations of this gravity call for the development of preventive and educational measures for the responsible and sustainable use of ICT. Full article
Article
Influence of ICTs on Math Teaching–Learning Processes and Their Connection to the Digital Gender Gap
Sustainability 2020, 12(16), 6692; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166692 - 18 Aug 2020
Viewed by 1381
Abstract
This study presents research aimed at analyzing whether, in contrast with traditional methodologies, the usage of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in the process of learning mathematics affects gender distinctions by affecting the low rate of matriculation of women into technological studies. The [...] Read more.
This study presents research aimed at analyzing whether, in contrast with traditional methodologies, the usage of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in the process of learning mathematics affects gender distinctions by affecting the low rate of matriculation of women into technological studies. The research was carried out by utilizing a quasi-experimental pretest–posttest procedure using a non-equivalent control group with traditional teaching methodology (textbook and usual drawing tools), and an experimental group, in which a classroom wiki and its digital equivalents were used in the Cabri, Geogebra, and Descartes programs. A quantifiable comparison of the effects on teaching was performed by assessing the strengths and weaknesses of employing ICTs. The results show a higher motivation in the experimental group, evident in their learning and their better marks compared to those of the control group. In addition, in the pretest and posttest, women’s marks were better than those of men. In conclusion, the transformation of the teaching–learning methodologies in mathematics is demanded with the use of programs such as Dynamic Geometry or Geogebra, which enable greater student involvement and more meaningful and relevant learning. Full article
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Article
Citizenship and Pluriculturalism Approaches of Teachers in the Hispanic and Japanese Contexts: Higher Education Research
Sustainability 2020, 12(8), 3109; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12083109 - 13 Apr 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1522
Abstract
Current higher education policies include several challenges, such as the academic internationalization of universities, mobility, and cultural plurality. Beyond the official curriculum, university educators have conceptions of citizenship and pluricultural competence. To understand the conceptions of educators on both topics in the Hispanic [...] Read more.
Current higher education policies include several challenges, such as the academic internationalization of universities, mobility, and cultural plurality. Beyond the official curriculum, university educators have conceptions of citizenship and pluricultural competence. To understand the conceptions of educators on both topics in the Hispanic and Japanese contexts of higher education, this article presents a quantitative study involving a collaboration between a sample of education and social sciences teaching staff from universities in Spain and Japan. The CYASPS® (Citizenship and Plurilingual Social Actors in Higher Education) instrument and a categories system were designed for data collection and analysis with the support of SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) software. Using a comparative approach, this study investigated the teaching staffs’ conceptions about citizenship and pluricultural teaching–learning environments, which focused on their views regarding different kinds of citizenship, citizens’ participation, and sources for the development of pluricultural competences. Based on a descriptive and factorial analysis, there were significant correlations between citizenship and pluricultural competence, with relevant connections between key aspects of pluricultural competence, including awareness of the rights from the liberal citizenship model, civic commitment of the republican citizenship model, and several elements of cosmopolitan and radical citizenship. Full article
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Article
Student Concepts after a Didactic Experiment in Heritage Education
Sustainability 2020, 12(7), 3046; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12073046 - 10 Apr 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 1335
Abstract
This work highlights the importance of heritage education as a vehicle for citizen education. We present an analysis of concepts of heritage, citizenship, and territory held by third-year social science students. The results are obtained from statistical analysis of a questionnaire given before [...] Read more.
This work highlights the importance of heritage education as a vehicle for citizen education. We present an analysis of concepts of heritage, citizenship, and territory held by third-year social science students. The results are obtained from statistical analysis of a questionnaire given before and after a didactic intervention and the application of a table of categories drawn up based on heritage education in terms of the parameters we consider desirable, from a holistic, socio-critical, motivating, and participatory perspective. The outcomes show the success of the intervention, with the students presenting better reflective and critical knowledge of their environment, showing appreciation, respect, protection, and dissemination of heritage as a symbol of identity and favoring the commitment to sustainable actions. Full article
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Article
An Integrated Model Approach of Education for Sustainable Development: Exploring the Concepts of Water, Energy and Waste in Primary Education
Sustainability 2020, 12(7), 2947; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12072947 - 07 Apr 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1193
Abstract
Education for Sustainable Development requires improving the knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of students at all levels of education. However, this should start from the earliest stages of education, promoting an effective teaching/learning process of key concepts for sustainable development. Accordingly, the general objective [...] Read more.
Education for Sustainable Development requires improving the knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of students at all levels of education. However, this should start from the earliest stages of education, promoting an effective teaching/learning process of key concepts for sustainable development. Accordingly, the general objective of this research was to analyze the concepts of water, energy and waste in the primary education curriculum (6–12 years) in Spain. A qualitative research approach was followed, with an exploratory and descriptive design. A system of categories was established for each of the concepts under study, with the aim of classifying the references found, analyzing their integration into the different subjects, academic courses, curricular elements and levels of cognitive demand required of the students. The results of the lexicographical analysis of the content reveal that the regulations governing primary education in Spain mainly focus on the concept of energy and, to a lesser extent, on the concepts of water and waste. In addition, cognitive levels of knowledge and comprehension predominate based on the taxonomy used. The results suggest the need to develop initiatives for the educational framework that promote not only learning, but also attitudes and behaviors that contribute to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Full article
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